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Faculty Profile

Jeff Engelhardt

Assistant Professor of Philosophy (2014)

Contact Information

engelhaj@dickinson.edu

East College Room 202
717.254.8301
https://sites.google.com/site/virtualjeffengelhardt/home

Bio

I'm interested in human minds, how to study them, and how they interact with broader social structures. Over the past year or so, I've been trying to figure out how a particular theory of concepts, social externalism, might help us understand systemic oppression. Other recent published work concerns the mind-body problem in philosophy, more general metaphysical questions about minds, and the nature of causation.

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • B.A., Saint Peter's College, 2004
  • Ph.D., Georgetown University, 2011

2019-2020 Academic Year

Spring 2020

PHIL 101 Intro to Philosophy
Cross-listed with WGSS 101-03.An introduction to Western philosophy with a focus on issues surrounding sex and gender. What is rape culture, and how does it work? Do we have free will? What roles do sex, gender, and race play in making us who we are? Do we have a political obligation to be gender non-binary? Do our gender roles affect what we can know?

WGSS 101 Introduction to Philosophy
Cross-listed with PHIL 101-01.An introduction to Western philosophy with a focus on issues surrounding sex and gender. What is rape culture, and how does it work? Do we have free will? What roles do sex, gender, and race play in making us who we are? Do we have a political obligation to be gender non-binary? Do our gender roles affect what we can know?

WGSS 201 Philosophy of Race & Gender
Cross-listed with PHIL 261-01.Is race real? Is gender? This course addresses these and related philosophical questions like, Why do we think in terms of race and gender, and Would a society without race or gender be better off?

PHIL 261 Philosophy of Race & Gender
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-03.Is race real? Is gender? This course addresses these and related philosophical questions like, Why do we think in terms of race and gender, and Would a society without race or gender be better off?

PHIL 391 Phenomenology
Phenomenology is the most influential and diverse movement in 20th century European philosophy. Other important movements in that century, e.g., existential phenomenology (Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, de Beauvoir), philosophical hermeneutics (e.g., Gadamer, Ricoeur), the philosophical reflections on the significance of the other (e.g., Levinas), each originate in some shape or form either as direct appropriations of or critical reactions to various approaches in the phenomenological movement that Edmund Husserl founded at the beginning of the 20th century. What is it about phenomenology that spawned such a diversity and richness of critical appropriations? Is phenomenology a distinctive method and practice, a set of doctrines, or a particular attitude or stance toward what it analyzes? This courses introduces its students to a few of the key approaches and themes that phenomenology has inspired. We will begin by first learning to see and do things phenomenologically rather than trying initially to understand and master its formidable technical vocabulary and doctrines. Toward this end we will start by reading John Russon’s Human Experience. Once we get a working sense for what it is to see and do things phenomenologically for ourselves, we will then be better equipped to read and understand Husserl’s Cartesian Meditations and perhaps a few of his other excerpted writings. We then turn to consider how subsequent philosophers trained in phenomenology like Merleau-Ponty, Heidegger, or Levinas criticized but also extended this tradition in fruitful and radical ways. Prior study of modern Western philosophers like Descartes and Kant will be a significant advantage as background preparation for taking this course.