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Faculty Profile

Neil Diamant

Professor of Asian Law and Society (2002)

Contact Information

diamantn@dickinson.edu

Stern Center for Global Educ Room 005
717.245.1540

Bio

Professor Diamant's research focuses on law and society in Asia (with particular reference to China, Japan, and India), civil-military relations in China, patriotism in comparative perspective, and Chinese constitutionalism. He also teaches courses on Israeli politics and Zionism. Publications: Professor Diamant is the author or co-author of three books, (with Martin Crotty and Mark Edele) The Politics of Veteran Benefits in the Twentieth Century: A Comparative History (Cornell University Press, 2020); Embattled Glory: Veterans, Military Families and the Politics of Patriotism in China, 1949-2007 (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009), and Revolutionizing the Family: Politics, Love, and Divorce in Urban and Rural China, 1949-1968 (University of California Press, 2000). He also co-edited Engaging the Law in China: State, Society and Possibilities for Justice (Stanford University Press, 2005). Recent articles include "Conspicuous Silence: Veterans and the Depoliticization of War Memory in China" (Modern Asian Studies, 2011), "Veterans, Organization, and the Politics of Martial Citizenship in China" (Journal of East Asian Studies, 2007), and, with Kevin J. O’Brien, "Veterans' Political Activism in China" (Modern China, 2014) and "Contentious Veterans: China's Ex-Officers Speak Out" (Armed Forces and Society, 2014). His articles on China's 1954 Constitution were published in The China Journal (2015) and Cold War Studies (2018). He has also contributed chapters to a number of edited volumes, including "The Limitations of Martial Citizenship in the People's Republic of China," in Peled, Lewin-Epstein, Mundlak and Cohen's Democratic Citizenship and War (2010); "Why Archives?" in Carlson, Gallagher, Lieberthal, and Manion's Chinese Politics: New Sources, Methods, and Field Strategies (2010); and "Legal Syncretism and Family Change in Urban and Rural China" in Galvan and Sil's, Reconfiguring Institutions across Time and Space: Syncretic Responses to Challenges of Political and Economic Transformation (2007).

Education

  • B.A., Hebrew University of Jerusalem 1988
  • M.A., University of Washington, 1991
  • Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1996

2019-2020 Academic Year

Spring 2020

EASN 206 China's Foreign Relations
Cross-listed with POSC 290-01. This course examines China's relationship to the major world powers, regions and international organizations. Beginning with a consideration of Chinese traditions of dealing with foreign countries, we will then examine the revolutionary legacy of Mao Zedong and the reorientation of foreign policy under Deng Xiaoping after 1978. The course will focus on the role of ideology, history, culture, interests, and leadership in China's foreign relations.

EASN 206 Politics of High-Speed Growth
Cross-listed with INST 290-02 and POSC 290-02. The rise of Asia as an economic force since the late 19th century has been one of the most important developments in the history of the world. Beginning with Japan in the 1880s but later encompassing South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore in the 1950s and 1960s and then China in the late 1990s, the Asia-Pacific region has been a dynamo of economic growth: billions of people have been lifted out of poverty, Asian states have grown rich and more vocal on the world stage, millionaires have been minted and new middle classes have emerged. In this class we will explore the historical, political, economic and cultural factors that help explain this development. Among the questions we will focus are whether there is a distinctly Asian model of development that stands in contrast to Western patterns, the role of wars, authoritarianism, colonialism, and cultural factors such as Confucianism.

INST 290 Politics of High-Speed Growth
Cross-listed with EASN 206-06 and POSC 290-02. The rise of Asia as an economic force since the late 19th century has been one of the most important developments in the history of the world. Beginning with Japan in the 1880s but later encompassing South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore in the 1950s and 1960s and then China in the late 1990s, the Asia-Pacific region has been a dynamo of economic growth: billions of people have been lifted out of poverty, Asian states have grown rich and more vocal on the world stage, millionaires have been minted and new middle classes have emerged. In this class we will explore the historical, political, economic and cultural factors that help explain this development. Among the questions we will focus are whether there is a distinctly Asian model of development that stands in contrast to Western patterns, the role of wars, authoritarianism, colonialism, and cultural factors such as Confucianism.

POSC 290 China's Foreign Relations
Cross-listed with EASN 206-03. This course examines China's relationship to the major world powers, regions and international organizations. Beginning with a consideration of Chinese traditions of dealing with foreign countries, we will then examine the revolutionary legacy of Mao Zedong and the reorientation of foreign policy under Deng Xiaoping after 1978. The course will focus on the role of ideology, history, culture, interests, and leadership in China's foreign relations.

POSC 290 Politics of High-Speed Growth
Cross-listed with EASN 206-06 and INST 290-02. The rise of Asia as an economic force since the late 19th century has been one of the most important developments in the history of the world. Beginning with Japan in the 1880s but later encompassing South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Singapore in the 1950s and 1960s and then China in the late 1990s, the Asia-Pacific region has been a dynamo of economic growth: billions of people have been lifted out of poverty, Asian states have grown rich and more vocal on the world stage, millionaires have been minted and new middle classes have emerged. In this class we will explore the historical, political, economic and cultural factors that help explain this development. Among the questions we will focus are whether there is a distinctly Asian model of development that stands in contrast to Western patterns, the role of wars, authoritarianism, colonialism, and cultural factors such as Confucianism.