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Faculty Profile

Alyssa DeBlasio

(she/her/hers)Associate Professor of Russian (2010)

Contact Information

deblasia@dickinson.edu

Bosler Hall Room 115
717.245.1766
http://filosofia.dickinson.edu/

Bio

Her teaching and research interests fall primarily along the intersections of Russian philosophy, literature, and cinema. She is also interested in language learning through film and media, as well as practical translation skills for advanced language courses. Before coming to Dickinson, Prof. DeBlasio taught in the Department of Philosophy at the Higher School of Economics (Moscow, Russia). In 2014 she published "The End of Russian Philosophy" (Palgrave), which looks at the transition of the discipline of philosophy in Russia from the 1990s through the 2000s. Her second book is "The Filmmaker's Philosopher" (Edinburgh University Press, 2019), which looks at the influence of Georgian philosopher Merab Mamardashvili on the Russian-Soviet film industry. At Dickinson she also contributes to the Philosophy Department and the Film Studies Program.

Education

  • M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 2006
  • Ph.D., 2010

Awards

  • Dickinson Award for Distinguished Teaching, 2019-20

2020-2021 Academic Year

Spring 2021

RUSS 102 Elementary Russian
An intensive study of the fundamentals of Russian grammar, with an emphasis on the development of reading, writing, speaking, and understanding skills. Short stories and songs will supplement the text.Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent

RUSS 260 The Russian Novel
Cross-listed with ENGL 331-02. Russian literature is known for its novels. More specifically, Russian literature is known for its long, philosophical novels: those structurally and existentially dense works in the thousands of pages, which Henry James described as “large, loose, baggy monsters.” And yet, 19th century Russian novels by Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Gogol, and Tolstoy regularly appear on lists of the “best literary works of all times.” In this course, we will delve into a selection of Russian novels that have shaped both Russian culture and world literature. We will ask questions like: Where does the Russian novelistic tradition come from, how does it differ from other European longform traditions, and what exactly is a novel anyway? We will consider why the “philosophical novel” has become synonymous with Russian writing, trace the development of the novel over the course of the 19th century, and examine the ways the novel might be especially well suited to reflect the complexity of human conscious experience. No knowledge of Russian required. TAUGHT IN ENGLISH

ENGL 331 The Russian Novel
Cross-listed with RUSS 260-01. Russian literature is known for its novels. More specifically, Russian literature is known for its long, philosophical novels: those structurally and existentially dense works in the thousands of pages, which Henry James described as “large, loose, baggy monsters.” And yet, 19th century Russian novels by Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Gogol, and Tolstoy regularly appear on lists of the “best literary works of all times.” In this course, we will delve into a selection of Russian novels that have shaped both Russian culture and world literature. We will ask questions like: Where does the Russian novelistic tradition come from, how does it differ from other European longform traditions, and what exactly is a novel anyway? We will consider why the “philosophical novel” has become synonymous with Russian writing, trace the development of the novel over the course of the 19th century, and examine the ways the novel might be especially well suited to reflect the complexity of human conscious experience. No knowledge of Russian required. TAUGHT IN ENGLISH

RUSS 334 Workshop in Translation
This course focuses on specific techniques for translating various kinds of texts (business, journalistic, scholarly, epistolary, and literary) from Russian into English, and from English into Russian. Concentrating on the practical matter of reading and writing, the course will also include special grammatical topics which present particular difficulties in translation, discussion of theories of translation, and introduction to technological tools of translation. The goal of the course is to further students' language ability and provide them with useful linguistic skills. Prerequisite: 231, 232 or equivalent. Offered every two years.