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Faculty Profile

Say Burgin

(she/her/hers)Assistant Professor of History (2017)

Contact Information

on sabbatical 2022-23

burgins@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 03
717.254.8058

Education

  • B.A., Saint Olaf College,2006
  • M.A., University of Leeds, 2009
  • Ph.D., 2013

2022-2023 Academic Year

Fall 2022

HIST 118 American Hist 1877 to Present
This course covers aspects of political evolution, foreign policy development, industrialization, urbanization, and the expanding roles of 20th century central government. Includes attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.

HIST 211 Civil Rights Movement: N & S
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01.The post-World War II movement for African Americans’ civil rights is often considered solely in terms of Southern-based groups and events. This class will explode the myth that the civil rights movement was confined to the South by exploring the national character of inequalities, segregation and the movement for Black freedom. With special attention to the years 1945-1975, this class will consider how segregation formed differently in Birmingham versus Alabama, how the fight for school de-segregation included battles in both Little Rock and New York, and how gender shaped protest politics and tactics of the movement across the nation. Key topics will include Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X and ideas of leadership; key campaigns in Birmingham, New York, Detroit and elsewhere; important groups like the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; and how ideas about masculinity and femininity shaped the movement. An important thread throughout the class will be understanding how racial inequalities came to be “baked into” the structures and systems that shape life in the United States – from housing to education to employment. We’ll learn about structural racism through the prism of Black resistance to it.

AFST 220 Civil Rights Movement: N & S
Cross-listed with HIST 211-04.The post-World War II movement for African Americans’ civil rights is often considered solely in terms of Southern-based groups and events. This class will explode the myth that the civil rights movement was confined to the South by exploring the national character of inequalities, segregation and the movement for Black freedom. With special attention to the years 1945-1975, this class will consider how segregation formed differently in Birmingham versus Alabama, how the fight for school de-segregation included battles in both Little Rock and New York, and how gender shaped protest politics and tactics of the movement across the nation. Key topics will include Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X and ideas of leadership; key campaigns in Birmingham, New York, Detroit and elsewhere; important groups like the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; and how ideas about masculinity and femininity shaped the movement. An important thread throughout the class will be understanding how racial inequalities came to be “baked into” the structures and systems that shape life in the United States – from housing to education to employment. We’ll learn about structural racism through the prism of Black resistance to it.