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Faculty Profile

Say Burgin

(she/her/hers)Assistant Professor of History (2017)

Contact Information

burgins@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 03
717.254.8058

Education

  • B.A., Saint Olaf College,2006
  • M.A., University of Leeds, 2009
  • Ph.D., 2013

2021-2022 Academic Year

Spring 2022

HIST 204 Intro Historical Methodology
Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.

AFST 220 African Amer Since Slavery
Cross-listed with HIST 273-01.

HIST 273 African Amer Since Slavery
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03.

WGSS 302 Gender & Black Power in the US
Cross-listed with HIST 311-01 and AFST 320-04. Gender and Black Power in the United States examines the US’s Black Power movement through the prism of gender. Black Power’s key principles – Black self-determination, pride and consciousness – have a long history in the US, and this class will focus on its history from the 1960s to the 1970s. We will consider Black Power’s expressions in groups as diverse as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the US Organization, the Republic of New Afrika, the Revolutionary Action Movement, the Congress of Racial Equality, the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, the Third World Women’s Alliance, the Committee for a Unified NewARK, and the Combahee River Collective. We’ll consider how these groups shaped and were shaped by shifting conceptions of femininity and masculinity, and we’ll explore the spaces that women created both within and apart from these groups as they mounted feminist critiques of the movement. Older understandings of the Black Power movement held that it was anti-feminist and characterized by male leadership and suffocating sexism. More recently, however, scholars have challenged this view by exploring how women in Black Power groups negotiated and challenged ideas about “proper” gender roles, how they theorized the intersections of nationalism and gender, and how they spearheaded feminist projects. This class will pay close attention to how scholars have crafted and re-crafted the history Black Power’s relationship to gender ideas and ideals.

HIST 311 Gender & Black Power in the US
Cross-listed with AFST 320-04 and WGSS 302-05. Gender and Black Power in the United States examines the US’s Black Power movement through the prism of gender. Black Power’s key principles – Black self-determination, pride and consciousness – have a long history in the US, and this class will focus on its history from the 1960s to the 1970s. We will consider Black Power’s expressions in groups as diverse as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the US Organization, the Republic of New Afrika, the Revolutionary Action Movement, the Congress of Racial Equality, the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, the Third World Women’s Alliance, the Committee for a Unified NewARK, and the Combahee River Collective. We’ll consider how these groups shaped and were shaped by shifting conceptions of femininity and masculinity, and we’ll explore the spaces that women created both within and apart from these groups as they mounted feminist critiques of the movement. Older understandings of the Black Power movement held that it was anti-feminist and characterized by male leadership and suffocating sexism. More recently, however, scholars have challenged this view by exploring how women in Black Power groups negotiated and challenged ideas about “proper” gender roles, how they theorized the intersections of nationalism and gender, and how they spearheaded feminist projects. This class will pay close attention to how scholars have crafted and re-crafted the history Black Power’s relationship to gender ideas and ideals.

AFST 320 Gender & Black Power in the US
Cross-listed with HIST 311-01 and WGSS 302-05. Gender and Black Power in the United States examines the US’s Black Power movement through the prism of gender. Black Power’s key principles – Black self-determination, pride and consciousness – have a long history in the US, and this class will focus on its history from the 1960s to the 1970s. We will consider Black Power’s expressions in groups as diverse as the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the US Organization, the Republic of New Afrika, the Revolutionary Action Movement, the Congress of Racial Equality, the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense, the Third World Women’s Alliance, the Committee for a Unified NewARK, and the Combahee River Collective. We’ll consider how these groups shaped and were shaped by shifting conceptions of femininity and masculinity, and we’ll explore the spaces that women created both within and apart from these groups as they mounted feminist critiques of the movement. Older understandings of the Black Power movement held that it was anti-feminist and characterized by male leadership and suffocating sexism. More recently, however, scholars have challenged this view by exploring how women in Black Power groups negotiated and challenged ideas about “proper” gender roles, how they theorized the intersections of nationalism and gender, and how they spearheaded feminist projects. This class will pay close attention to how scholars have crafted and re-crafted the history Black Power’s relationship to gender ideas and ideals.