Faculty Profile

Maria Bruno

Associate Professor of Anthropology and Archaeology (2011)

Contact Information

brunom@dickinson.edu

Environmental Archaeology Lab Room 3
717.245.1923

Bio

I study the diversity of practices that smallholder, farming societies, past and present, employ to create productive landscapes, and how these practices shaped and were shaped by interrelated environmental, social, and political processes. I investigate these landscapes through patterns in plants: those that have been domesticated and modified by farmers and the wild plant communities that change in response to human activity. I have worked primarily in the Lake Titicaca Basin of the South American Andes as well as the Llanos de Moxos region of the Amazon Basin. Specific topics of investigation include: the domestication of the Andean “superfood” quinoa and its close relative kañawa; processes of agricultural intensification employed by Formative period (1500 BCE-500CE) farmers on the Taraco Peninsula, Bolivia; and how modern-day indigenous Aymara farming communities interact with their landscape in both productive and meaningful ways.

Education

  • B.A., University of Nevada, 1998
  • M.A., Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, 2001
  • Ph.D., 2008

2018-2019 Academic Year

Fall 2018

FYSM 100 First-Year Seminar
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to Dickinson as a "community of inquiry" by developing habits of mind essential to liberal learning. Through the study of a compelling issue or broad topic chosen by their faculty member, students will: - Critically analyze information and ideas - Examine issues from multiple perspectives - Discuss, debate and defend ideas, including one's own views, with clarity and reason - Develop discernment, facility and ethical responsibility in using information, and - Create clear academic writing The small group seminar format of this course promotes discussion and interaction among students and their professor. In addition, the professor serves as students' initial academic advisor. This course does not duplicate in content any other course in the curriculum and may not be used to fulfill any other graduation requirement.

ARCH 300 Arch Theory & Interpretation
Cross-listed with ANTH 300-01.

ANTH 300 Arch Theory & Interpretation
Cross-listed with ARCH 300-01.

Spring 2019

ARCH 110 Archaeology & World Prehistory
Cross-listed with ANTH 110-01.

ANTH 110 Archaeology & World Prehistory
Cross-listed with ARCH 110-01.

LALC 262 South American Archaeology
Cross-listed with ANTH 262-01 and ARCH 262-01.

ARCH 262 South American Archaeology
Cross-listed with ANTH 262-01 and LALC 262-01.

ANTH 262 South American Archaeology
Cross-listed with ARCH 262-01 and LALC 262-01.