Faculty Profile

Robert Boyle

Professor of Physics and Astronomy (1981)

Contact Information

boyle@dickinson.edu

Tome Scientific Building Room 218
717.245.1415

Bio

Major research interests involve infrared astronomy, studies of old stellar systems, and variable stars. His teaching activities include introductory physics, introductory astronomy, theoretical physics, and a variety of other topics in physics and astrophysics.

Education

  • B.A., Princeton University, 1971
  • M.Phil., Yale University, 1976
  • Ph.D., 1981

2018-2019 Academic Year

Fall 2018

PHYS 141 Physics for the Life Sciences
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include mechanics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141.

PHYS 141 Physics for the Life Sciences
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include mechanics, fluid dynamics, thermodynamics. Three one-hour lectures and one three-hour lab per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141.

Spring 2019

ASTR 110 Stars, Galaxies, and Beyond!
Modern astronomy encompasses a wide range of fascinating topics, from cutting-edge techniques used to detect and survey exosolar planets, to advances in astrophysics that reveal tantalizing glimpses into the nature of space and the beginning and possible end of our universe as a whole. This course will look at the tools and physics that astronomers utilize, as well as the electromagnetic spectrum to explore and expand our understanding of the Universe. Students will apply fundamental ideas from physics to the Sun, as well as distant objects, both within and outside our own Galaxy. Three hours classroom, one two-hour laboratory a week. This course may count toward the astronomy minor.

PHYS 282 Intro to Theoretical Physics
A rigorous survey of mathematical topics and techniques that are commonly used in theoretical physics. Topics include vector analysis, differential equations, power series, linear algebra, tensors, and vector calculus (gradient, divergence, curl, line integrals, and so on). The primary focus of this course is on solving problems as a means to improve students’ confidence and understanding of mathematics within the context of physical systems. Prerequisite: 211 or permission of instructor. Corequisite: MATH 171 or permission of the instructor.