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Coronavirus Update

Dickinson will invite students back for the spring. Campus buildings are closed and face coverings are required on campus.

Additional Information.


Faculty Profile

Mark Aldrich

Associate Professor of Spanish; Executive Director of the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues, 2019-22 (1991)

Contact Information

aldrich@dickinson.edu

255 W Louther St 2nd Fl Room 5
717.245.1288

Bio

He is particularly interested in 20th century Spanish poetry, although his publications include both Peninsular and Spanish American subjects. He has also published literary translations. Current scholarship is focused on poetry translation and the work of Rafael Pérez Estrada.

Education

  • B.A., Hamilton College, 1981
  • M.A., Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, 1991

2019-2020 Academic Year

Spring 2020

SPAN 202 Advanced Grammar
The primary goal of this course is to develop students' formal knowledge of Spanish by reviewing and studying the more challenging grammatical structures. The course will also work on development of skills in reading, oral expression, and vocabulary development. The purpose of the course is to equip students with the formal grammatical background necessary to be successful in courses on Hispanic literatures, linguistics and cultures. Prerequisite: 201, 120, or the equivalent.

LALC 390 Verdades y mentiras
Cross-listed with SPAN 410-01. Many novelists have been drawn to journalism and vice versa. This course explores that dynamic in a contemporary context. We live in a time of “fake news”, “deep fakes” and much debate about the relationship between fiction and reality. Our work in this course will afford insights into how the debate is developing in the Spanish-speaking world. Along the way we will read some great literature, including works by Gabriel García Márquez, Mario Vargas Llosa, Soledad Puértolas, Rosa Montero and Antonio Soler, among others.

SPAN 410 Verdades y mentiras
Cross-listed with LALC 390-01. Many novelists have been drawn to journalism and vice versa. This course explores that dynamic in a contemporary context. We live in a time of “fake news”, “deep fakes” and much debate about the relationship between fiction and reality. Our work in this course will afford insights into how the debate is developing in the Spanish-speaking world. Along the way we will read some great literature, including works by Gabriel García Márquez, Mario Vargas Llosa, Soledad Puértolas, Rosa Montero and Antonio Soler, among others.