Courses

100 State and Society in the U.S.
This course introduces students to the basic elements of state and society in the United States, from basic tenets of governance to broader elements of historical and contemporary identity and culture in American life. Its underlying theme is the historical struggle between "pluribus" and "unum," as reflected in the U.S. motto "E pluribus unum" (out of the many, one): how well has the United States sustained itself as a singular noun? How have the demands of diversity - a welcome but always-contested expansion of the "we" in "we, the people" - been reflected in government, the arts, popular culture, the media, or for that matter daily neighborhood life? These topics will be addressed in both classroom sessions and "study tours" that may include travel to Harrisburg, Gettysburg, Philadelphia, and Washington, DC. Along the way, the course also seeks to model key pedagogies common in the liberal arts classroom, emphasizing discussion, collaboration, close reading, and, in conjunction with WRPG 101, U.S. Research Writing for International Students.
Offered in Summer only during the International Student Summer Institute. Open to international students immediately prior to their enrollment at Dickinson as first-year matriculants. One-half course. Co-requisite: WRPG 101.

150 Intro to Intercultural Comm
This course examines the basic elements of interpersonal communication and culture as the two relate to one another. Emphasis is given to the influence of culture on the interpretation of the communication act and to the communication skills that enhance cross-cultural communication.
Offered in Summer School only.

250 Selected Topics in Interdisciplinary Studies
A topics course examining sustainability issues in global context.

390 Intercultural Seminar
This seminar is offered at selected Dickinson Centers abroad to encourage students to reflect broadly on their site-specific experiences. The experiential and the theoretical dimensions of out-of-class experiences such as internships and service learning reinforce and enrich one another, providing students with a window onto the workings of their host society. Through readings, class discussions, writing assignments, and presentations, this seminar provides a rigorous academic context for evaluating and understanding the experiential components of the course. Offered only at selected Dickinson Centers abroad programs. Contact the Center for Global Study and Engagement for the list of programs offering this course.