Faculty Profile

Anthony Underwood

Assistant Professor of Economics (2013)

Contact Information

underwoa@dickinson.edu

Althouse Hall Room 216
717.245.1782
http://blogs.dickinson.edu/underwood/

Bio

Research interests include household energy use and emissions, the environmental implications of urbanization, and the challenges for climate change mitigation posed by global demographic change. General teaching interests include environmental economics, econometrics, microeconomics, and population economics.

Curriculum Vitae

Education

  • B.S., Purdue University, 2006
  • M.A., Colorado State University, 2008
  • Ph.D., 2013

2018-2019 Academic Year

Fall 2018

ECON 222 Environmental Economics
A study of human production and consumption activities as they affect the natural and human environmental systems and as they are affected by those systems. The economic behavioral patterns associated with the market economy are scrutinized in order to reveal the biases in the decision-making process which may contribute to the deterioration of the resource base and of the quality of life in general. External costs and benefits, technological impacts, limits to economic growth, and issues of income and wealth distribution are examined. A range of potential policy measures, some consistent with our life style and some not, are evaluated. Prerequisite: 111.

ECON 298 Econometrics
This course is an introduction to econometrics in which the tools of economic theory, mathematics, and statistical inference are applied to the analysis of economic data. Students will develop foundational knowledge of applied statistics and econometrics through exploration of empirical techniques relevant to quantitative economics including probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, modeling, simple and multiple linear regression analysis, and time series analysis. In addition, this course will cover basic extensions of a multiple linear regression model such as dummy variables and interaction terms. Students will use Stata, or other statistical analysis software widely used in economics, to understand and apply empirical work.Prerequisite: 111, 112, MATH 170, and MATH 121 (or INBM 220 or MATH 225)

ECON 298 Econometrics
This course is an introduction to econometrics in which the tools of economic theory, mathematics, and statistical inference are applied to the analysis of economic data. Students will develop foundational knowledge of applied statistics and econometrics through exploration of empirical techniques relevant to quantitative economics including probability, estimation, hypothesis testing, correlation, modeling, simple and multiple linear regression analysis, and time series analysis. In addition, this course will cover basic extensions of a multiple linear regression model such as dummy variables and interaction terms. Students will use Stata, or other statistical analysis software widely used in economics, to understand and apply empirical work.Prerequisite: 111, 112, MATH 170, and MATH 121 (or INBM 220 or MATH 225)

ECON 314 Urban Economics
This course applies concepts from microeconomics and statistics to the study of one scarce resource in particular: space. The objective is to introduce students to urban and regional economics by learning how we organize ourselves spatially and exploring the advantages and disadvantages of population clusters. We will start by examining how and why cities form, current population trends in the United States, the growth of urban areas, and the potential agglomeration benefits from urbanization. We will then discuss land prices and land use patterns, transportation, housing, local government, and crime. Along the way we’ll discuss issues such as poverty and discrimination, suburbanization and sprawl, pollution and congestion, and the role of cities in sustainable development.

ECON 314 Econometrics
Prerequisites: One or more of the core intermediate theory courses (268, 278, 288) depending on the topic.

ECON 500 Independent Study

ECON 550 Independent Research

ECON 550 Independent Research

ECON 560 Stu/Faculty Collaborative Rsch

Spring 2019

SINE 201 Intro Soc Innovat/Entrepren
This course introduces students to the essential concepts, mindsets and skill sets associated with social entrepreneurship. We begin with an overview of the field of social entrepreneurship. We will then develop a conceptual foundation in systems thinking and the community capital framework. The former allows students to grasp the complexity of social and environmental issues by viewing these issues through the lens of systems theory. The latter recognizes multiple forms of capital that are essential to developing sustainable communities: natural, physical, economic, human, social, and cultural capital. Other course topics may include creativity, innovation, social justice, alternative approaches to economics and business, and sustainability. Through definitional readings, case studies and/or biographies, students gain an understanding of the power of social entrepreneurship to create shared value at the local, regional, and global level. This course serves as the introduction to the Certificate in Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship, but it is open to all students from all academic disciplines who wish to develop their own capacities to initiate meaningful change in our world.offered every spring.

ECON 496 Econ Demog & Sustain Develop
Permission of Instructor Required. Demography is the study of the determinants and consequences of population change. It is concerned with effectively everything that influences or can be influenced by population size, population growth or decline, population processes, population spatial distribution, population structure, and population characteristics. As we go from the historical pattern of high birth and death rates to the increasingly common pattern of low birth and death rates, we pass through the demographic transition. This is actually a whole set of transitions relating to changes in health and mortality, fertility, migration, age structure, urbanization, and family and household structure. Each of these separate, but interrelated, changes have serious consequences for the way societies and economies work and the natural environment they are built upon. Thus, the objectives of this course are threefold: (1) to develop knowledge of the underlying demographic theories explaining these transitions; (2) to use this knowledge to understand the interrelationships between these transitions; and (3) to determine the implications of these transitions for sustainable development, that is, for social, economic, and environmental sustainability. Some questions we will consider include (but are not limited to): Why are so many adults living alone? Why are women having fewer babies? What impact do sub-replacement birth rates have on economies and societies? What role do the rights of women have in demographic transitions? Why are adults waiting so long to get married or not getting married at all? What happens when the population ages? Why are more and more people choosing to live in cities? Is this expected growth of cities sustainable? Often for familiarity and simplicity we will use data and readings focused on the United States, but since these transitions have evolved in ways that vary from one part of the world to another, this course will often have a necessarily international focus. Naturally, given the expansive subject matter, this course will require much from you – it is reading and writing intensive.