Faculty Profile

C. Helen Takacs

Associate Professor of International Business and Management (2007)

Contact Information

takacsh@dickinson.edu

Althouse Hall Room 104
717.245.1024

Bio

Her doctoral work was in the areas of strategic management and international business. Prof. Takacs's research explores the intersections between financial and non-financial organizational performance. She studies sustainable practices in business, business and climate change, and how business can be a force for good. An extension of this is research and teaching on social entrepreneurship, which applies market-based tools to addressing social and environmental challenges.

Education

  • B.A., Bowdoin College, 1978
  • M.B.A., Cleveland State University, 1982
  • Ph.D., Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, 2005

2016-2017 Academic Year

Fall 2016

FYSM 100 First-Year Seminar
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to Dickinson as a "community of inquiry" by developing habits of mind essential to liberal learning. Through the study of a compelling issue or broad topic chosen by their faculty member, students will: - Critically analyze information and ideas - Examine issues from multiple perspectives - Discuss, debate and defend ideas, including one's own views, with clarity and reason - Develop discernment, facility and ethical responsibility in using information, and - Create clear academic writing The small group seminar format of this course promotes discussion and interaction among students and their professor. In addition, the professor serves as students' initial academic advisor. This course does not duplicate in content any other course in the curriculum and may not be used to fulfill any other graduation requirement.

INBM 240 Marketing in a Global Context
The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.

INBM 240 Marketing in a Global Context
The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom. Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.

INBM 250 Finance
Knowledge of finance will allow students to adopt the perspective of financial officers in both for-profit as well as not-for-profit organizations. This knowledge is needed to evaluate the health of an organization using key performance indicators and making ethical decisions that involve both short-run and long-run planning horizons. In the short run, this knowledge helps to effectively carry out business functions such as managing cash flow, borrowing money for short periods of time, and keeping control over inventory. In the long run, it helps to choose among competing investment projects and alternative, efficient methods of raising capital. Also, as individuals, knowledge of basic finance will help students to make better-informed decisions concerning their personal financial situations. Apart from covering the fundamentals of financial markets, instruments and institutions, this course will emphasize critical thinking based on quantitative reasoning and decision-making skills. This will include the use of elementary statistical and algebraic methods to investigate fundamental principles of theoretical finance such as the relationship between risk and reward and the pricing of capital assets. Apart from basic theory, knowledge of the hands-on aspects of financial modeling will be imparted via use of spreadsheet software packages such as Microsoft EXCEL; whereby students will be encouraged to create and analyze computational models to test and demonstrate some of the theoretical concepts taught. Prerequisites: ECON 111 and INBM 110.

INBM 250 Finance
Knowledge of finance will allow students to adopt the perspective of financial officers in both for-profit as well as not-for-profit organizations. This knowledge is needed to evaluate the health of an organization using key performance indicators and making ethical decisions that involve both short-run and long-run planning horizons. In the short run, this knowledge helps to effectively carry out business functions such as managing cash flow, borrowing money for short periods of time, and keeping control over inventory. In the long run, it helps to choose among competing investment projects and alternative, efficient methods of raising capital. Also, as individuals, knowledge of basic finance will help students to make better-informed decisions concerning their personal financial situations. Apart from covering the fundamentals of financial markets, instruments and institutions, this course will emphasize critical thinking based on quantitative reasoning and decision-making skills. This will include the use of elementary statistical and algebraic methods to investigate fundamental principles of theoretical finance such as the relationship between risk and reward and the pricing of capital assets. Apart from basic theory, knowledge of the hands-on aspects of financial modeling will be imparted via use of spreadsheet software packages such as Microsoft EXCEL; whereby students will be encouraged to create and analyze computational models to test and demonstrate some of the theoretical concepts taught. Prerequisites: ECON 111 and INBM 110.