Faculty Profile

David Strand

Charles A. Dana Professor of Political Science (1980)

Contact Information

strand@dickinson.edu

Stern Center for Global Educ Room 105E
717.245.1204

Bio

His teaching and research fields include modern Chinese politics and history, urban studies, human rights, and Asian studies and the environment. Books include Rickshaw Beijing: City People and Politics in the 1920s (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1989, Reconstructing Twentieth Century China: State Control, Civil Society and National Identity (co-editor with Kjeld Erik Brødsgaard) (New York: Oxford University/Clarendon Press, 1998), Cities in Motion: Interior, Coast and Diaspora in Transnational China (co-editor with Sherman Cochran and Wen-hsin Yeh) (Berkeley: Institute of East Asian Studies China Research Monographs, University of California, Berkeley, 2007), New Lives for Asian Images (co-editor with Samuel K. Parker) (Carlisle, PA: Dickinson College Department of East Asian Studies and Trout Gallery, 2008), and An Unfinished Republic: Leading By Word and Deed in Early Twentieth Century China (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2011). His latest publication is “A Walk in the Park: Singapore’s Green Corridor as a Homegrown Import,” Asia Research Institute Working Paper Series No. 223 (July 2014) National University of Singapore. He will serve as Director of the Dickinson Norwich Humanities Program, 2015-17.

Education

  • B.A., Lawrence University, 1971
  • M.A., Columbia University, 1973
  • M.Phil., 1974
  • Ph.D., 1979

2017-2018 Academic Year

Fall 2017

EASN 101 Introduction to East Asia
An interdisciplinary study of East Asian civilizations. The course provides a framework for understanding by introducing students to traditional social and cultural patterns in East Asia and to the variety of transformations that have taken place there.

POSC 120 American Government
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.

POSC 120 American Government
A basic introductory course in American federal government which emphasizes its structure and operation. Special attention is given to the executive, legislative, and judicial processes.

EASN 206 Asian Urban Ecology
Cross-listed with POSC 290-01. Asian cities are among the most economically productive in the world, and also number some of the most polluted and environmentally challenged urban centers on the planet. Further complicating this picture is the fact that many Asian cities are also on the cutting edge of policies associated with “ecological modernization,” the effort to balance and manage competing economic and environmental interests and values. This course will examine a range of Asian cities, including, for example, Beijing, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai and Seoul, and a range of issues like resource management, urban sprawl and congestion, environmental protection, green space and urban design, biodiversity and environmental justice with a view to better understanding the evolving interdependence among political, economic, social and natural systems in urban Asia.

POSC 246 The Legislative Process
An analysis of the legislative branch of government, especially Congress. Emphasis is placed upon the legislature as a social system, the decision-making process, the interrelationships with the political parties and interest groups, the executive and the judiciary. Prerequisite: 120, or permission of the instructor.

POSC 290 Once Lifetime/New Normal
The 2016 U.S. Presidential Election was a unique and fascinating campaign that may have forever changed the landscape of American politics. This course offering analyzes the 2016 election, and breaks down all the critical components to running a campaign and important factors that influence the outcome of an election. Campaign experts will serve as class guests affording students a unique opportunity to engage with and learn from some of the best minds in politics.

POSC 290 Asian Urban Ecology
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01. Asian cities are among the most economically productive in the world, and also number some of the most polluted and environmentally challenged urban centers on the planet. Further complicating this picture is the fact that many Asian cities are also on the cutting edge of policies associated with “ecological modernization,” the effort to balance and manage competing economic and environmental interests and values. This course will examine a range of Asian cities, including, for example, Beijing, Singapore, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Shanghai and Seoul, and a range of issues like resource management, urban sprawl and congestion, environmental protection, green space and urban design, biodiversity and environmental justice with a view to better understanding the evolving interdependence among political, economic, social and natural systems in urban Asia.