Faculty Profile

David Sarcone

Associate Professor of International Business and Management (2001)

Contact Information

sarconed@dickinson.edu

Althouse Hall Room 218
717.245.1261

Education

  • B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1975
  • M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1978
  • Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 2008

2017-2018 Academic Year

Fall 2017

FYSM 100 First-Year Seminar
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to Dickinson as a "community of inquiry" by developing habits of mind essential to liberal learning. Through the study of a compelling issue or broad topic chosen by their faculty member, students will: - Critically analyze information and ideas - Examine issues from multiple perspectives - Discuss, debate and defend ideas, including one's own views, with clarity and reason - Develop discernment, facility and ethical responsibility in using information, and - Create clear academic writing The small group seminar format of this course promotes discussion and interaction among students and their professor. In addition, the professor serves as students' initial academic advisor. This course does not duplicate in content any other course in the curriculum and may not be used to fulfill any other graduation requirement.

HEST 400 Senior Sem in Health Studies
The course will take an interdisciplinary approach to understanding the impact of national health care reform on regional models of health care service delivery and reimbursement. We will begin the course with a comprehensive review of the U.S. Health Care System to include an identification of the system’s strengths and weaknesses. This will follow with a detailed review of enacted health care legislation (The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act) and proposed replacement legislation (The American Health Care Act). To ensure a comprehensive review of the health system and proposals to improve overall system performance, we will survey literature from numerous disciplines to include psychology, sociology, economics, organizational theory, health policy, health services research, management, public health, and public finance. With support from the Partnership for Better Health, the community-based research will include student lead interviews with local and regional health care administrators and providers. The students will develop the interview guide; conduct interviews; and, code and analyze data generated from the interviews. Students then will use the research results to write a report to include academic background information, the survey methodology used, the findings, and discussion. The planned working report title is The Impact of National Health Care Reform on Systems of Health Care: Perspectives of Regional Health Care Institutions and Providers. The report will inform decisions made by the Partnership for Better Health in collaboration with regional health care providers to improve population and individual health status within the foundation’s defined service area. Learning goals: - effective team building and collaboration - professional conduct in communication and collaboration with a community partner - high quality oral and written final reports suitable for a community partner - interdisciplinary examination of national health care reform (e.g., psychology, sociology, economics, organizational theory, health policy, health services research, management, public health, and public finance perspectives) - skills associated with research including the development of interview guides; completion of interviews; coding and analysis data generated from the interviews; and, preparation of presentation and reports of the research findings.

INBM 500 Independent Study

Spring 2018

INBM 110 Fundamentals of Accounting
This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals.

INBM 400 Sem:Intl Bus Policy & Strategy
This capstone course focuses on the challenges associated with formulating strategy in multinational organizations. The course will examine multinational business decisions from the perspective of top managers who must develop strategies, deploy resources, and guide organizations that compete in a global environment. Major topics include foreign market entry strategies, motivation and challenges of internationalization, the analysis of international industries, building competitive advantage in global industries, and the role of the country manager. Case studies will be used to increase the student's understanding of the complexities of managing international business operations. Prerequisite: Completion of at least four of the five 200-level courses (200, 220, 230, 240, 250). This course will not fulfill distribution requirement.

INBM 400 Sem:Intl Bus Policy & Strategy
This capstone course focuses on the challenges associated with formulating strategy in multinational organizations. The course will examine multinational business decisions from the perspective of top managers who must develop strategies, deploy resources, and guide organizations that compete in a global environment. Major topics include foreign market entry strategies, motivation and challenges of internationalization, the analysis of international industries, building competitive advantage in global industries, and the role of the country manager. Case studies will be used to increase the student's understanding of the complexities of managing international business operations. Prerequisite: Completion of at least four of the five 200-level courses (200, 220, 230, 240, 250). This course will not fulfill distribution requirement.