Faculty Profile

David Sarcone

Associate Professor of International Business and Management (2001)

Contact Information

sarconed@dickinson.edu

Althouse Hall Room 218
717.245.1261

Education

  • B.S., Pennsylvania State University, 1975
  • M.B.A., University of Pittsburgh, 1978
  • Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University, 2008

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

INBM 100 Fundamentals of Business
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.

INBM 100 Fundamentals of Business
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.

INBM 400 Sem:Intl Bus Policy & Strategy
This capstone course focuses on the challenges associated with formulating strategy in multinational organizations. The course will examine multinational business decisions from the perspective of top managers who must develop strategies, deploy resources, and guide organizations that compete in a global environment. Major topics include foreign market entry strategies, motivation and challenges of internationalization, the analysis of international industries, building competitive advantage in global industries, and the role of the country manager. Case studies will be used to increase the student's understanding of the complexities of managing international business operations. Prerequisite: Completion of at least four of the five 200-level courses (200, 220, 230, 240, 250). This course will not fulfill distribution requirement.

Spring 2015

INBM 100 Fundamentals of Business
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.

INBM 110 Fundamentals of Accounting
This is a core course designed to provide students with a fundamental knowledge of the "language of business" and its applications for decision-making purposes. The course is organized into three sections. In the first section students learn about the accounting cycle- essentially the analysis and recording of financial transactions and the preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The second section of the course focuses on the analysis and interpretation of financial statements. This section emphasizes the use of financial information by external stakeholders for decision making. The third section of the course concentrates on the fundamentals of management accounting. This section centers on the use of accounting information for operational performance evaluation as well as operational and capital decision making. By the end of the course, students will understand the basic principles and concepts of accounting, the business and economic activities that generate accounting information, how accounting information is used by internal and external stakeholders for economic decision making, and how accounting affects society and individuals. This course fulfills the QR graduation requirement.

HEST 250 Health & Aging
Contact the Center for Global Study and Engagement to apply for this course.Permission of Instructor Required.This course is designed for undergraduates from all disciplinary backgrounds. It is an introduction to and prerequisite for students participating in Health and Wellness in Later Life: Comparative Research on American and Japanese Practices, a summer field-study course offered in 2015 by Global Education in collaboration with Akita International University. In the course, students initially explore the meanings and relationships between health and aging across cultures, with an emphasis on Japanese and American perspectives. Students then examine how culture, economy, and social organization influence national aging policies and practices. They explore further how these policies and practices have been taken up in the local community, and interact in-class with practicing professionals serving this community. In anticipation of the field-study portion of the summer course, students also study qualitative and quantitative research methods, including structured interview techniques, survey design and implementation, data analysis, and reporting.

INBM 500 Independent Study

INBM 500 Independent Study

Summer 2015

HEST 560 Stu/Faculty Collaborative Rsch
The course is a project-based learning opportunity (PBL) that examines the community health of two structurally similar but geographically distinct regions in Japan and the United States. The PBL project seeks to measure the health of these aging communities based on an investigation of resident “Quality of Life” (QOL). In so doing, the course assumes that high resident QOL is dependent on the effective support of local, regional, and national institutions. The course, therefore, has two fundamental aims: (1) to introduce students to local and national actors dedicated to the support of the aged and (2) to evaluate the role and effectiveness of these institutions on the individual level through quantitative and qualitative research with local elderly residents. The aims of the course are reflected in its structure. First, the course begins with an introduction to regional networks of governmental and non-governmental organizations dedicated to support of the aged. Following this introduction, students conduct surveys and ethnographic interviews with elderly residents in select neighborhoods. Finally, based on data acquired through site visits, surveys, and interviews, students present their evaluation of resident QOL in oral and written form. The course is divided into four main sections: 1. An introduction to the regional network of care providers: Students are introduced to regional networks of governmental and non-governmental organizations dedicated to support of the aged in both settings. 2. An introduction to national health care policy: Students meet regional and national officials and discuss programs and policies related to the elderly. 3. Completion of community based research. Students conduct QOL surveys and ethnographic interviews with elderly residents in select neighborhoods in both settings. 4. Completion of preliminary research paper and presentation. Based on data acquired through site visits, surveys, and interviews, students present their evaluation of resident QOL in oral and written form to interested community stakeholders. This eight-week program invites students to consider the similarities and differences in individual and societal perspectives and approaches to addressing health and aging. Throughout the program students are encouraged to compare across societies those factors which influence the health and well-being of the elderly.