Faculty Profile

Anthony Pires

Associate Professor of Biology (1993)

Contact Information

pires@dickinson.edu

James Hall - Rector Complex Room 1225
717.245.1632
http://www.dickinson.edu/academics/programs/biology/content/Dr--Anthony-Pires/

Bio

He teaches courses in neurobiology, behavioral biology and invertebrate zoology. His research interests are in the neural control of developmental events, especially the regulation of settlement and metamorphosis in larvae of marine invertebrates.

Education

  • B.A., Harvard College, 1982
  • Ph.D., Cornell University, 1990

2015-2016 Academic Year

Fall 2015

BIOL 321 Invertebrate Zoology w/Lab
An integrated lecture and laboratory study of the anatomy, taxonomy, evolution, ecology, physiology, and embryology of invertebrates. Representatives of the major invertebrate phyla are examined in the field and in the laboratory. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: two BIOL courses numbered between 120 and 129 or ENST 131, 132 (or 130). For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is 124 and PSYC 125.

Spring 2016

BIOL 330 Neurobiology w/Lab
This course takes a cellular approach to the structure and function of nervous systems. Integrated laboratory and classroom study focus on the physical and chemical properties of neurons that make them different from other cells, and the relationships between neurons that allow nervous systems to interpret the environment and to generate behavior. Extracellular and intracellular electrical recording methods are used extensively, and are supplemented and neurochemical and anatomical techniques such as high-pressure liquid chromatography and immunocytochemistry. Prerequisites: two BIOL courses numbered between 120 and 129, OR, 124 and PSYC 125 and NRSC 200.

BIOL 330 Neurobiology w/Lab
This course takes a cellular approach to the structure and function of nervous systems. Integrated laboratory and classroom study focus on the physical and chemical properties of neurons that make them different from other cells, and the relationships between neurons that allow nervous systems to interpret the environment and to generate behavior. Extracellular and intracellular electrical recording methods are used extensively, and are supplemented and neurochemical and anatomical techniques such as high-pressure liquid chromatography and immunocytochemistry. Prerequisites: two BIOL courses numbered between 120 and 129, OR, 124 and PSYC 125 and NRSC 200.

BIOL 560 Stu/Faculty Collaborative Rsch

BIOL 560 Stu/Faculty Collaborative Rsch

BIOL 560 Stu/Faculty Collaborative Rsch