Faculty Profile

Gregory Kaliss

Visiting Assistant Professor of History (2014)

Contact Information

kalissg@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 4
717.254.8169

Education

  • B.A., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, 1998
  • M.A., 2004
  • Ph.D., 2008

2015-2016 Academic Year

Fall 2015

HIST 118 American Hist 1877 to Present
This course covers aspects of political evolution, foreign policy development, industrialization, urbanization, and the expanding roles of 20th century central government. Includes attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.

HIST 206 American Environmental History
Cross-listed with ENST 206-01.

ENST 206 American Environmental History
Cross-listed with HIST 206-01.

HIST 500 Independent Study

Spring 2016

HIST 118 American Hist 1877 to Present
This course covers aspects of political evolution, foreign policy development, industrialization, urbanization, and the expanding roles of 20th century central government. Includes attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.

HIST 211 Sports, Race & Ameri Dream
Students who have taken this topic as AMST 200 in Fall 2014, may not take/receive credit for this class.Many have looked to the world of sports as a realization of the "American Dream" of a color-blind meritocracy in which participants succeed or fail on their own merits alone. And yet issues of racial identity have been central to the story of sports in America, echoing and informing social debates regarding equality, racial and gender stereotypes, legalized segregation, and the quest for civil rights. We will explore these issues and others by examining the history of a wide range of subjects from the late nineteenth century through to the present, including: the life and times of Jack Johnson; Jim Thorpe and the experiences of Native American athletes; the Black Athlete Revolt of 1968; Michael Jordan and corporate America's influence on black athletes; and much more. Course materials will include historical accounts, sports journalism, theoretical analysis, documentary and feature films, and Internet message boards.

HIST 211 American Landscapes
This course will explore how Americans have historically conceived of, represented, created, and contested a wide range of American landscapes. From the Hudson River Valley to the Yosemite Valley, from Central Park to the World's Columbian Exposition, and many more noteworthy sites in between, this course will explore the history of artistic representations of landscapes, preservation campaigns, and landscape architecture and park design. By exploring the battles fought between groups over the use and "misuse" of public landscapes, students will also gain insights into the class, race and gender divides that affected individuals' relationships to the land.