Faculty Profile

Douglas Edlin

Associate Professor of Political Science (2004)

Contact Information

edlind@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 305
717.245.1388

Bio

His research and teaching interests are in comparative constitutionalism, the judicial process and judicial review, the legal and policy issues raised by developments in assisted reproductive technology, and the politics of race and gender in the United States.

Education

  • B.A., Hobart College, 1988
  • M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 1990
  • J.D., Cornell Law School, 1993
  • Ph.D., Oxford University, 2002

2016-2017 Academic Year

Fall 2016

PHIL 255 Philosophy of Law
Cross-listed with LAWP 255-01.

LAWP 255 Philosophy of Law
Cross-listed with PHIL 255-01.

POSC 290 Comparative Law
Cross-listed with LAWP 290-01. This course explores most of the major legal traditions of the world. We will begin by considering the concepts, functions and methods of comparative legal study. We will consider broad and specific distinctions between the common law and civil law traditions, with special emphasis on two common law systems (the United States and the United Kingdom) and two civil law systems (France and Germany). We then examine the EU legal system. We conclude by evaluating the historical and institutional development of legal cultures by considering the systems of Jewish, Islamic and Hindu law. Some of the questions we will try to answer are: Why did certain societies develop certain legal cultures? Are certain legal systems best suited to certain social arrangements? What is the relationship between religious law and municipal law? How do different legal traditions attempt to achieve the sometimes competing social, legal and governmental goals of order and justice? What role do constitutions and courts play in maintaining the rule of law?

LAWP 290 Comparative Law
Cross-listed with POSC 290-01. This course explores most of the major legal traditions of the world. We will begin by considering the concepts, functions and methods of comparative legal study. We will consider broad and specific distinctions between the common law and civil law traditions, with special emphasis on two common law systems (the United States and the United Kingdom) and two civil law systems (France and Germany). We then examine the EU legal system. We conclude by evaluating the historical and institutional development of legal cultures by considering the systems of Jewish, Islamic and Hindu law. Some of the questions we will try to answer are: Why did certain societies develop certain legal cultures? Are certain legal systems best suited to certain social arrangements? What is the relationship between religious law and municipal law? How do different legal traditions attempt to achieve the sometimes competing social, legal and governmental goals of order and justice? What role do constitutions and courts play in maintaining the rule of law?

Spring 2017

POSC 248 The Judiciary
Cross-listed with LAWP 248-01.

LAWP 248 The Judiciary
Cross-listed with POSC 248-01.

LAWP 400 Race and the Judicial Process
This course explores the role of the courts in the experience of racial minorities in the United States. Primarily, but not exclusively, we look at the courts’ impact on African Americans. Where race is concerned, the courts have figured prominently in some of America’s proudest and most shameful moments. Slavery, segregation, affirmative action, redistricting and the treatment of defendants in the American criminal justice system are some of the topics we will address. We will consider the ways in which current policy debates are informed by the historical arc of racial inequities in American law and politics. We will attempt to understand why the issue of race is so persistently divisive in American society and how the courts might still serve to help the United States achieve its egalitarian aspirations.

LAWP 500 Independent Study