Faculty Profile

Angela DeLutis-Eichenberger

Assistant Professor of Spanish (2010)

Contact Information

delutisa@dickinson.edu

Bosler Hall Room 121
717.245.1326

Education

  • B.A., B.S., Ithaca College, 2001
  • M.A., University of Maryland-College Park, 2003
  • Ph.D., 2010

2015-2016 Academic Year

Fall 2015

SPAN 116 Intermediate Spanish
This course is a continuation of Spanish 104. The course focuses on all four langage skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with increasing emphasis on writing and speaking. Prerequisite: 104, 108, or placement by department. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.

LALC 390 19th C. Chilean Literature
Cross-listed with SPAN 410-01.This seminar examines several major historical events and sociopolitical issues of nineteenth-century Chile and their re-conceptualizations in the foundational literary texts of the era. Topics may include: the wars of independence and the search for political order, the conservative settlement, the war against the Peru-Bolivian Confederation, the Liberal impulse, the formation of the Generation of 1842, and the War of the Pacific. To fully engage with the most pressing issues of the past, we will frequently consult primary source materials, including digitized reproductions of 19th century periodicals and political documents. Following the bicentennial celebration of Chile’s independence in 2010, we will also consider how several of the historical and literary figures and historical events have been commemorated in more contemporary times, through film, television programs, and other media.

SPAN 410 19th C. Chilean Literature
Cross-listed with LALC 390-01.This seminar examines several major historical events and sociopolitical issues of nineteenth-century Chile and their re-conceptualizations in the foundational literary texts of the era. Topics may include: the wars of independence and the search for political order, the conservative settlement, the war against the Peru-Bolivian Confederation, the Liberal impulse, the formation of the Generation of 1842, and the War of the Pacific. To fully engage with the most pressing issues of the past, we will frequently consult primary source materials, including digitized reproductions of 19th century periodicals and political documents. Following the bicentennial celebration of Chile’s independence in 2010, we will also consider how several of the historical and literary figures and historical events have been commemorated in more contemporary times, through film, television programs, and other media.

Spring 2016

SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish
This course is designed for students who have never taken Spanish previously. The course focuses on all four language skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with an emphasis on vocabulary development and listening comprehension development. Prerequisite: No prior study of Spanish and permission of department.

SPAN 101 Elementary Spanish
This course is designed for students who have never taken Spanish previously. The course focuses on all four language skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, with an emphasis on vocabulary development and listening comprehension development. Prerequisite: No prior study of Spanish and permission of department.

SPAN 231 Env Iss in Contemp Chilean Lit
Permission of Instructor Required.Includes spring break trip to Chile.This course examines a variety of environmental issues affecting Chile, including: the design of “natural” spaces and tourist attractions in urban areas, pollution, deforestation, erosion and logging, mining, and the endangerment of animals, particularly those facing possible extinction. Additionally, we will study the treatment of humans as disposable entities through the case study of the dictatorship of Augusto Pinochet, and we will delve into the possible ramifications of such disregard for human life. Through ecocriticism, we will likewise analyze the representations of such issues as they appear in selections of contemporary Chilean literature written by the following authors: Pablo Neruda (1904-1973) (poetry selections), Gabriela Mistral (1889-1957) (poetry selections), Gonzalo Drago (1906-1994) (short stories), Luis Sepúlveda (1949-) (novella), and Francisco Coloane (1910-2002) (short story). After having read and examined works by Neruda, Mistral and Drago, and having studied the life of Sepúlveda, who had served as Salvador Allende’s bodyguard, during Spring Break, we will travel to Chile to visit a variety of sites related to the material analyzed. We will tour the nation’s capital, Santiago, lending particular attention to the surrounding parks (i.e. Parque Forestal) and outdoor tourist attractions (i.e. Cerro Santa Lucía and San Cristóbal), considering the role of these spaces of “nature” in an urban setting. There, we will also visit La Chascona, a house built for Pablo Neruda and his mistress, while outside of the city, we will tour another house built for Neruda, Isla Negra. In the oldest church in Santiago, la Iglesia San Francisco, we will visit the Museo Colonial, where Gabriela Mistral’s Nobel Prize medal is housed. We will later explore the abandoned Sewell Mining Town, a Unesco World Heritage Site, and, if possible, plunge into the Sewell Mine, known as El Teniente, which served as the inspiration for several of Drago’s short stories. Back in Santiago, we will then visit La Moneda, el Museo de la memoria y los derechos humanos, monuments to the disappeared and the General Cemetery (including Salvador Allende’s tomb), and consider how these sites are linked to the life of Luis Sepúlveda. Our trip will conclude with an ecotour in El morado, during which we will explore Andean glaciers and relax in thermal springs to reflect on the importance of environmental protection. Students are encouraged to digitally record their experiences throughout this adventure in photos and in videos that they will use as part of their final project for this class. The travel component of this course is required. Prior to our departure, all students will sign a contract, pledging to only utilize the Spanish language while abroad. Important note: This course does not formally cover grammar. Should you need specific grammar explanations or assistance, please schedule an appointment during office hours.

SPAN 550 Independent Research

Summer 2016

SPAN 205 Malaga Summer Immersion
Offered only at the Dickinson Study Center in Málaga. A five-week course in contemporary Spanish language and culture offered at the University of Málaga, Málaga, Spain. Students will reside with Spanish families, speak only Spanish during this five-week period, and participate in intensive language and culture classes, special lectures, and field trips arranged by Dickinson in cooperation with the Cursos para Extranjeros of the University of Málaga. Prerequisite: 201 or equivalent and permission of the department.