Faculty Profile

Linda Brindeau

Assistant Professor of French (2013)

Contact Information

brindeal@dickinson.edu

Bosler Hall Room 112
717.245.2548039

Bio

Linda Brindeau specializes in the literature of the Caribbean and the Maghreb with a focus on Haiti and Algeria. She has published on the literary significance of Franco-Algerian migrations in postcolonial France. Her current research explores the representation of natural, political, and social disasters in contemporary Haitian fiction.

Education

  • B.A., Universit√© du Maine-France, 2000
  • M.A., University of Arkansas, 2003
  • Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2013

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

FREN 101 Elementary French
Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.

FREN 101 Elementary French
Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.

FREN 104 Elementary French
Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.101 or the equivalent.

FREN 500 Independent Study

Spring 2015

FREN 104 Elementary French
Complete first-year course. Intensive study of the fundamentals of French grammar, with special attention given to pronunciation and oral expression. Cultural readings in the context of language acquisition.101 or the equivalent.

WGST 300 Prost & Sex in Haitian Lit
Cross-listed with FREN 362-01 and LALC 300-03. Taught in French. The objective of this class is to help develop students’ understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics, and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on women’s agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences – financially, emotionally and socially – of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?

LALC 300 Prost & Sex in Haitian Lit
Cross-listed with FREN 362-01 and WGST 300-02.Taught in French. The objective of this class is to help develop students’ understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics, and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on women’s agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences – financially, emotionally and socially – of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?

FREN 362 Prost & Sex in Haitian Lit
Cross-listed with LALC 300-03 and WGST 300-02. The objective of this class is to help develop students’ understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics, and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on women’s agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences – financially, emotionally and socially – of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?