Faculty Profile

Linda Brindeau

Assistant Professor of French (2013)

Contact Information

brindeal@dickinson.edu

Bosler Hall Room 112
717.254.8039

Bio

Linda Brindeau specializes in the literature of the Caribbean and the Maghreb with a focus on Haiti and Algeria. She has published on the literary significance of Franco-Algerian migrations in postcolonial France. Her current research explores the representation of natural, political, and social disasters in contemporary Haitian fiction.

Education

  • B.A., Universit√© du Maine-France, 2000
  • M.A., University of Arkansas, 2003
  • Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2013

2017-2018 Academic Year

Fall 2017

FYSM 100 First-Year Seminar
The First-Year Seminar (FYS) introduces students to Dickinson as a "community of inquiry" by developing habits of mind essential to liberal learning. Through the study of a compelling issue or broad topic chosen by their faculty member, students will: - Critically analyze information and ideas - Examine issues from multiple perspectives - Discuss, debate and defend ideas, including one's own views, with clarity and reason - Develop discernment, facility and ethical responsibility in using information, and - Create clear academic writing The small group seminar format of this course promotes discussion and interaction among students and their professor. In addition, the professor serves as students' initial academic advisor. This course does not duplicate in content any other course in the curriculum and may not be used to fulfill any other graduation requirement.

FREN 230 Comm in Fr & Francophone Cont
Intensive oral and written practice of French in the context of issues and themes such as a sense of place, the lessons of time, the social contract, and intellectual and artistic life. This course makes use of texts, films, multi media and interactive computer strategies in the development of conversational and writing skills. Intended as the gateway to the major or minor in French and Francophone Studies. Prerequisite: 201 or the equivalent.

LALC 300 Prost & Sex in Haitian Lit
Cross-listed with FREN 362-01 and WGSS 301-02.Taught in French The objective of this class is to help develop students’ understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on women’s agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences – financially, emotionally and socially – of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?

WGSS 301 Prost & Sex in Haitian Lit
Cross-listed with FREN 362-01 and LALC 300-02.Taught in French The objective of this class is to help develop students’ understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on women’s agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences – financially, emotionally and socially – of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?

FREN 362 Prost & Sex in Haitian Lit
Cross-listed with LALC 300-02 and WGSS 301-02.Taught in French The objective of this class is to help develop students’ understanding of Haitian culture and society in a course structured around the themes of Prostitution and Sexuality. Prostitution is a site of inevitable conflict because of the cultural ambiguities about sexuality, gender, and race. The course will first offer a survey of the family structure and marriage in Haitian society. It will then explore, in more detail, the representation, rhetorics and economies of prostitution in a variety of Haitian literary texts and films. This course considers different historical views on prostitution transnationally and on the structured effects of sexism, transphobia, heteronormativity and neo/colonialism on women’s agency. It will introduce students to basic gender political discussions surrounding prostitution and explore the ways in which prostitution reflects and shapes gender norms and social hierarchies. During the course, we will explore some of the many questions that surround prostitution; such as: Why do people enter into prostitution? What are the consequences of prostitution, psychologically and physically? How has globalization and migration changed the sex trade? What are the consequences – financially, emotionally and socially – of prostitution? How can we interpret the contributing roles of the state, organized crime, the media, and corruption? Is prostitution inherently a form of violence against women? Do prostitutes exert feminine agency, or are they the victims of a sexualized male-dominated society? Does prostitution challenge or conform to societal gender constructs?