Department Chair
Melinda W. Schlitt
Professor of Art History, William W. Edel Professor of Humanities (1990).
Weiss Center for the Arts Room 227
schlitt@dickinson.edu
(717) 245-1245
Contributing Faculty
Christopher J. Bilodeau
Associate Professor of History (2006).
Denny Hall Room 302
(717) 245-1385 | bilodeac@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of Vermont, 1991; M.A., Brown University, 1994; M.A., Columbia University, 1998; Ph.D., Cornell University, 2006.

He focuses his research on the history of American Indian-European interaction during the American colonial period, paying particular attention to the French, English, and Indian interaction. He teaches courses on Colonial America, the American Revolution, American Indian History, and the roles that violence plays in colonial situations.
Sylvie G. Davidson
(on sabbatical 2014-15)
Professor of Romance Languages and Literatures; John J. Curley '60 and Ann Conser Curley '63 Faculty Chair in Global Education (1979).

davidson@dickinson.edu
Licence-ès-Lettres, Université de Montpellier, 1967; Maîtrise d'Italien, 1968; Doctorat ès Lettres, 1978.
Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, 1995-1996; Dickinson Award for Distinguished Teaching, 2004-2005.

Professor Davidson has directed the Toulouse year program and the Bologna Summer Immersion program on several occasions and is engaged in issues related to global education. Her scholarship has concentrated on French and Italian literatures, fine arts, and music of the Renaissance and 17th century. Her current research is centered on Humanism in Southern France.
Mara E. Donaldson
(on sabbatical Spring 2015)
Professor of Religion (1990).
East College Room 207
(717) 245-1228 | donaldsm@dickinson.edu
B.A., Wilson College, 1971; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1974; Ph.D., Emory University, 1984.
Dickinson Award for Distinguished Teaching, 1998-1999. Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, 2000-2001.

Her teaching focuses on contemporary religious thought, especially feminist and liberation theologies, and religion and art, including contemporary fantasy literature, film, and popular culture.
Phillip J. Earenfight
(on sabbatical Spring 2015)
Director of the Trout Gallery, Associate Professor of Art and Art History (2002).
Weiss Center for the Arts Room 102B
(717) 245-1709 | earenfip@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of Washington, 1985; M.A., Rutgers University, 1990; Ph.D., 1999.

He specializes in the art, architecture, and urban planning of late medieval Italy. He is currently working on a study of the Misericordia confraternity and its place on the Piazza del Duomo in Florence during the late thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. Other projects include books and articles on the Carlisle Indian School, Richard Henry Pratt, and the drawings and photographs of the Plains Indians who held captive at Ft. Marion (St. Augustine, Florida: 1875-1877). Recently he completed a study on the works of contemporary painter Joyce Kozloff.
Christopher A. Francese
The Asbury J. Clarke Professor of Classical Studies (1996).
East College Room 110
(717) 245-1202 | francese@dickinson.edu
B.A., Oberlin College, 1987; M.A., University of Texas at Austin, 1989; Ph.D., 1993.

He specializes in Roman literature and culture, and Greek mythography. He is the project director of Dickinson College Commentaries, a series of online multimedia editions of classical texts, and is the author of three books: Ancient Rome: An Anthology of Sources (Hackett, 2014), Ancient Rome in So Many Words (Hippocrene, 2007), and Parthenius of Nicaea and Roman Poetry (Peter Lang, 2001). He also produces the Latin Poetry Podcast, and directs a series of professional development workshops for Latin teachers, the Dickinson Latin Workshops. With student and faculty collaborators he created the Latin and Greek Core Vocabularies, the thousand most common words in Latin and the 500 most common words in ancient Greek, collated and edited on the basis of large samples.
Carol Ann Johnston
(on sabbatical 2014-15)
Professor of English, Martha Porter Sellers Chair of Rhetoric and the English Language (1990).

johnston@dickinson.edu
B.A., Baylor University, 1978; M.A., 1980; M.A., Harvard University, 1983; Ph.D., 1992.

Her teaching interests include literature of the Early Modern period, poetry workshop, and Southern Women Writers. Her current research investigates subjectivity and agency in seventeenth-century English poetry. She has written a book on Eudora Welty and is working on a manuscript placing poet Thomas Traherne in the context of seventeenth-century visual traditions.
Andrea B. Lieber
Associate Professor of Religion, Sophia Ava Asbell Chair in Judaic Studies (1998).
East College Room 106
(717) 245-1482 | lieber@dickinson.edu
B.A., Vassar College, 1989; M.A., Columbia University, 1993; M.Phil., 1995; Ph.D., 1998.

Her courses explore the transformations of Judaism as a living religion and evolving culture from its origins in antiquity through its varied manifestations in the 20th century. Special interests include: Judaism and early Christianity, Jewish mysticism (kabbalah), women and gender in Jewish tradition.
Marc Mastrangelo
(on leave of absence 2014-15)
Professor of Classical Studies (1997).

mastrang@dickinson.edu
B.A., Amherst College, 1985; M.A., Wadham College, Oxford University, 1988; M.A., Brown University, 1995; Ph.D., 1996.

His special interests include fourth century Christian Latin poetry, Latin philosophical prose, Greek tragedy and ancient philosophy. His specialty is the poet Prudentius.
James F. McMenamin
Assistant Professor of Italian (2009).
Bosler Hall Room 116
(717) 254-8444 | mcmenamj@dickinson.edu
B.A., Middlebury College, 1996; M.A., 1997; Laurea, Università degli Studi di Firenze, 2001; Ph.D., Harvard University, 2008.

Prof. McMenamin specializes in medieval Italian literature. He has published articles on Dante, Petrarch and Italian lyric poetry. This year, during his sabbatical, he will work on a book project entitled "The Philosophy of the Middle: Dante, Petrarch and Giordano Bruno" where he will explore the philosophical notion of the middle and its applicability in medieval and early modern Italian literature. Prof. McMenamin has participated in the LGBTQQIA Pride@Dickinson Safe Zone Training and is a supporter of the Green Dot Non-Violence Initiative.
Theodore Pulcini
Thomas Bowman Professor of Religion and Philosophy (1995).
East College Room 203A
(717) 245-1208 | pulcini@dickinson.edu
B.A., Harvard College, 1976; M.A., University of Notre Dame, 1979; Th.M., Harvard Divinity School, 1982; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1994.
Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, 1998-1999; Dickinson Award for Distinguished Teaching, 2002-03.

His teaching responsibilities focus on exploring the Biblical texts in their historical, social, and comparative contexts. He also specializes in Islam, early Christianity, and Eastern Orthodox Christianity. Research interests include relations between Islam and Christianity, both past and present.
Abraham Quintanar
Associate Professor of Spanish (2001).
Bosler Hall Room 205
(717) 245-1884 | quintana@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of Scranton, 1993; M.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1995, Ph.D., 2002.

Thomas L. Reed, Jr.
Professor of English (1977).
East College Room 306
(717) 245-1216 | reedt@dickinson.edu
B.A., Yale University, 1969; M.A., University of Virginia, 1971; Ph.D., 1978.
Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, 1997-1998.

His field is medieval literature, with special emphasis on Chaucer and Marie de France. Other research interests include the Victorian novel and film adaptations of classic English and American texts. He is the author of two books -- "Middle English Debate Poetry and the Aesthetics of Irresolution" and "The Transforming Draught: 'Jekyll and Hyde,' Robert Louis Stevenson, and the Victorian Alcohol Debate" - and he is currently working on an historical novel about Stevenson.
Alberto J. Rodríguez
Professor of Spanish (1990).
Bosler Hall Room 220
(717) 245-1278 | rodrigua@dickinson.edu
B.A., Clark University, 1974; M.A., 1976; Ph.D., Brown University, 1987.

His scholarship has focused on the Spanish novel of the Golden Age, particularly Cervantes. The subject of his research is the study of narrative discourse in Don Quixote. Besides his work on Cervantes, he has published on other authors of the Spanish Golden Age, and also on Cuban literature.
Melinda W. Schlitt
Professor of Art History, William W. Edel Professor of Humanities (1990).
Weiss Center for the Arts Room 227
(717) 245-1245 | schlitt@dickinson.edu
B.A., State University of New York at Purchase, 1981; M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1983; Ph.D., 1991.

Professor Schlitt teaches courses in art and architecture of the Italian Renaissance, Mannerism, and ancient Greek and Roman art and architecture. Her current research focuses on 15th and 16th-century Italian art and criticism. She has published several articles on Francesco Salviati, Giorgio Vasari, and Michelangelo, and edited (and contributed to) two important books of new essays, "Perspectives on Early Modern and Modern Intellectual History," (Univ. of Rochester Press, 2001) and "Gifts in Return: Essays in Honour of Charles Dempsey," (Univ of Toronto Press, 2012). Prof. Schlitt is currently completing a monograph on Francesco Salviati and a study on the Arch of Constantine.
Jacob Sider Jost
Assistant Professor of English (2011; 2013).
East College Room 309
(717) 254-8950 | siderjoj@dickinson.edu
B.A., Goshen College, 2002; B.A., University of Oxford, 2005; M.A., 2009; Ph.D., Harvard University, 2011.

Sider Jost's research and teaching interests include the long eighteenth century, Shakespeare, Austen, and Hume. His first book, Prose Immortality, 1711-1819, is forthcoming from the University of Virginia Press, where it won the 2012 Walker Cowen Memorial Prize. He has work published or forthcoming in ELH, SEL, Modern Intellectual History, and elsewhere.
Stephen Weinberger
Robert Coleman Professor of History (1969).
Denny Hall Room 217
(717) 245-1500 | weinberg@dickinson.edu
B.A., Northeastern University, 1965; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1966; Ph.D., 1969.

His teaching interests center on medieval and Renaissance history, European intellectual history, and the history of film. His current research involves conflict in medieval society, and censorship in the American film industry.
Blake M. Wilson
Professor of Music (1993).
Weiss Center for the Arts Room 210
(717) 245-1297 | wilson@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of California at Berkeley, 1978; M.M., Indiana University, 1982; Ph.D., 1987.

Blake Wilson teaches courses in music history, film music, and directs the Dickinson Collegium. Both as performer and scholar, he specializes in music of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance, and his research interests include the music of renaissance Italy (especially Florence), performance practice, compositional process, and the relationship between music and other disciplines (rhetoric, poetry, visual art). His current work concerns the interaction of oral and written musical traditions in the culture of Renaissance Florence, the early madrigal, and the works of Heinrich Isaac (the primary recipient of Medici musical patronage).