Department Chair
Stephen Weinberger
Robert Coleman Professor of History (1969).
Denny Hall Room 217
(717) 245-1500
Contributing Faculty
Todd Arsenault
Associate Professor of Art (2007).
Weiss Center for the Arts Room 326
(717) 254-8414 |
B.A., Dickinson College, 1999; M.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design, 2003.

Professor Arsenault works primarily with painting,drawing and digital media. One of his main interests is the merger of digital technology with traditional studio practices. His work has been shown throughout the U.S. and Canada. He has had solo exhibitions in New York and Spain and is represented by Massimo Audiello Gallery in New York City, and Galeria Fucares in Madrid, Spain.
Alex Bates
Associate Professor of Japanese Language and Literature (2006).
Stern Center for Global Educ Room 009
(717) 245-1127 |
B.A., Brigham Young University, 1998; M.A., University of Michigan, 2001; Ph.D., 2006.

Professor Bates is a specialist in modern Japanese literature and film. In addition to survey courses in these areas, he has taught courses in Japanese youth culture, war in fiction and film, ecocriticism, East Asian film, and cinematic adaptations of Japanese literature. Professor Bates' book on representations of the 1923 earthquake that destroyed Tokyo is forthcoming from the University of Michigan, Center for Japanese Studies Press. His research in this area has continued into Japan's 2011 tsunami disaster. Other research interests include urban modernism and early post-war Japanese literature and film.
Marcelo Borges
Professor of History (1997).
Denny Hall Room 111
(717) 245-1186 |
Licenciado en Historia, Universidad Nacional de La Plata, 1988; Profesor en Historia, 1988; Ph.D., Rutgers University, 1997.

He teaches Latin American, Iberian, and comparative history. His current research deals with transatlantic migration from Portugal to Latin America in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly to Argentina; and with migration, identity and community formation in the oil fields of Patagonia, Argentina.
Alyssa DeBlasio
Assistant Professor of Russian (2010).
Bosler Hall Room 115
(717) 245-1766 |
M.A., University of Pittsburgh, 2006; Ph.D., 2010.

Her teaching and research interests fall primarily along the intersections of philosophy, Russian literature, and Russo-Soviet cinema. She is also interested in language learning through blogging and media, as well as practical translation skills for advanced language courses. Before coming to Dickinson, Prof. DeBlasio taught in the Department of Philosophy at the Higher School of Economics (Moscow, Russia). In 2014 she published a book titled The End of Russian Philosophy (Palgrave), which looks at the transition of the discipline of philosophy in Russia from the 1990s through the 2000s. She also contributes to the Philosophy Department and the Film Studies Program.
Mara E. Donaldson
Professor of Religion (1990).
East College Room 207
(717) 245-1228 |
B.A., Wilson College, 1971; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1974; Ph.D., Emory University, 1984.
Dickinson Award for Distinguished Teaching, 1998-1999. Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, 2000-2001.

Her teaching focuses on contemporary religious thought, especially feminist and liberation theologies, and religion and art, including contemporary fantasy literature, film, and popular culture.
Christopher A. Francese
The Asbury J. Clarke Professor of Classical Studies (1996).
East College Room 110
(717) 245-1202 |
B.A., Oberlin College, 1987; M.A., University of Texas at Austin, 1989; Ph.D., 1993.

He specializes in Roman literature and culture, and Greek mythography. He is the project director of Dickinson College Commentaries, a series of online multimedia editions of classical texts, and is the author of three books: Ancient Rome: An Anthology of Sources (Hackett, 2014), Ancient Rome in So Many Words (Hippocrene, 2007), and Parthenius of Nicaea and Roman Poetry (Peter Lang, 2001). He also produces the Latin Poetry Podcast, and directs a series of professional development workshops for Latin teachers, the Dickinson Latin Workshops. With student and faculty collaborators he created the Latin and Greek Core Vocabularies, the thousand most common words in Latin and the 500 most common words in ancient Greek, collated and edited on the basis of large samples.
Margaret G. Frohlich
Associate Professor of Spanish (2007).
Bosler Hall Room 5M
(717) 245-1155 |
B.A., University of Colorado-Denver, 2001; Ph.D., Stony Brook University, 2006.

She specializes in 20th century and contemporary literature and film with a focus on the construction of national and sexual identities. Her book, Framing the Margin: Nationality and Sexuality across Borders, won the international competition for the Victoria Urbano Monograph Prize of the Asociación Internacional de Literatura y Cultura Femenina Hispánica. Her articles have appeared in Studies in Documentary Film; Studies in Spanish and Latin American Cinemas (formerly Studies in Hispanic Cinemas); Letras Femeninas; and Romance Review.
Kamaal Haque
Assistant Professor of German (2008).
Bosler Hall Room 6M
(717) 245-1283 |
B.A., Drew University, 1997; M.A., Washington University in St. Louis, 2000; Ph.D., 2006.

His research interests include German film, the literature and culture of the German-speaking Alps, and the influence of the Middle East in German culture. He has published on such diverse topics as the German mountain film, the poetry of Goethe, and Muslim minorities in Germany today. In addition to courses at all levels of German language and culture, he has taught recent courses such as The Mountain in the German Cultural Imagination, Minority Cultures in the German Context and Modern German Film.
Nitsa Kann
(on sabbatical Spring 2016)
Associate Professor of Judaic Studies (2005).
East College Room 208
(717) 254-8977 |
B.A., Hebrew University, 1982; M.A., University of California at Berkeley, 1984; Ph.D., 2005.

Her teaching interests include Hebrew language, Hebrew Literature, Kabbalah, and Middle Eastern Cinema. She is the author of two Hebrew books of poems, 'Black Soul Singer' (1989), and 'A Woman With Child' (1992), and the author of two Hebrew novels, 'Gazelle of Love' (1995), and 'Herotica' (1998).
Nicoletta Marini-Maio
Associate Professor of Italian and Film Studies (2007).
Bosler Hall Room 219
(717) 245-1592 |
B.A., University of Perugia, Italy, 1986; M.A., University of Rome, 1998; M.A., University of Pennsylvania, 2001; Ph.D., 2006.

Professor Marini-Maio completed her Ph.D. at the University of Pennsylvania, specializing in Italian cinema. She is the Editor of the international online journal gender/sexuality/italy. Her main fields of research are film studies, Italian cinema, and theater, particularly the intersections between politics, gender, cultural representations, popular culture, the narrative mode, and collective memory. Her monograph on the representation of left-wing terrorism in Italian film and theatre is near to completion. She is currently working on a book on Silvio Berlusconi in the cinema and doing research on the "decamerotici," a series of movies inspired by Boccaccio's Decameron produced in Italy in the 1970s. She has published articles on Italian cinema and theatre, Italian teaching pedagogy, and technology-enhanced language learning. In this areas, she has also co-edited the scholarly volumes "Set the Stage! Teaching Italian through Theater" (Yale University Press, 2009) and "Dramatic Interactions" (Cambridge Scholars, 2011). At Dickinson, she is sharing with her students her passion for film and theater.
Edward P. Merwin
Part-time Associate Professor of Religion; Director of The Milton B. Asbell Center for Jewish Life(2001).
Asbell Center
(717) 245-1636 |
B.A., Amherst College, 1990; M.A., Hunter College of the City University of New York, 1998; Ph.D., 2002.

His teaching interests are in American Jewish history and popular culture, with a particular focus on the Lower East Side and Yiddish culture. His current research centers on Jewish-themed Broadway plays, and on the history of the Jewish deli in America.
Tullio Pagano
Associate Professor of Italian (1991).
Bosler Hall Room 203
(717) 245-1274 |
Laurea in Lettere, Universita di Genova, 1981; M.A., University of Oregon, 1987; Ph.D., 1991.

His current research focuses on the representation of landscape in Italian literature and society. Other interests include: diasporic and Italian American studies, theories of modern allegory and symbol, and simulation in modern and postmodern literature.
Antje Pfannkuchen
Assistant Professor of German (2009).
Bosler Hall Room 11M
(717) 254-8151 |
M.A., FU Berlin, 2000; M.P.S., New York University, 2002; Ph.D., 2010.

Antje Pfannkuchen is a researcher in German media studies and cultural history. Her work is concerned with relationships of media-technology, science, literature and art. She has published on German Enlightenment poet and scientist Georg Christoph Lichtenberg as well as on Ezra Pound's interests in 19th century German science. Her current book project investigates the conditions and correlations of Romanticism and the invention of photography. Courses she has been and will be teaching include German Media Studies, German Film, German Stories - classical and digital, the Culture of the two Germanies, German Romanticism, German-Jewish Culture and all levels of German language.
Jerry Philogene
Associate Professor of American Studies (2005).
Denny Hall Room 16
(717) 254-8953 |
B.A., New School University, 1989; M.A., New York University, 1993; Ph.D., 2009.
Dickinson Award for Distinguished Teaching, 2014-15.

Jerry Philogene specializes in 20th century African American and Afro Caribbean visual arts and cultural history. Her teaching interests include interdisciplinary American cultural history and black cultural and identity politics. Her research interests explore the intersections of race, ethnicity, class, and gender as articulated in contemporary visual and popular culture.
Gregory Steirer
Assistant Professor of English and Film Studies (2013).
East College Room 409
(717) 254-8095 |
B.A. University of Pennsylvania, 2001; Ph.D., 2010.

Professor Steirer’s teaching and research interests include film and television, media industries, genre fiction, comic books, video games, and digital culture. He has served three times as a researcher for the Connected Viewing Initiative of the Carsey-Wolf Center in Santa Barbara and his recent scholarship has appeared in the journals Postmodern Culture, Television and New Media, The Journal of Graphic Novels and Comics, and Creative Industries. In the coming semesters, he plans to teach courses on the sitcom, the fantasy genre, media change, and video games.
Stephen Weinberger
Robert Coleman Professor of History (1969).
Denny Hall Room 217
(717) 245-1500 |
B.A., Northeastern University, 1965; M.A., University of Wisconsin, 1966; Ph.D., 1969.

His teaching interests center on medieval and Renaissance history, European intellectual history, and the history of film. His current research involves conflict in medieval society, and censorship in the American film industry.
Blake M. Wilson
Professor of Music (1993).
Weiss Center for the Arts Room 210
(717) 245-1297 |
B.A., University of California at Berkeley, 1978; M.M., Indiana University, 1982; Ph.D., 1987.

Blake Wilson teaches courses in music history, film music, and directs the Dickinson Collegium. Both as performer and scholar, he specializes in music of the late Middle Ages and Renaissance, and his research interests include the music of renaissance Italy (especially Florence), performance practice, compositional process, and the relationship between music and other disciplines (rhetoric, poetry, visual art). His current work concerns the interaction of oral and written musical traditions in the culture of Renaissance Florence, the early madrigal, and the works of Heinrich Isaac (the primary recipient of Medici musical patronage).
Adjunct Faculty
Shahin Izadi
Adjunct Faculty in Film Studies (2015).
Denny Hall Room 14
B.A., The Catholic University of America, 2001; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2011; M.F.A., Temple University, 2015.