Spring 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
RELG 101-01 What is Religion?
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
The course introduces students to methods in the study of religion and to major world religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The approach in the course is comparative and interdisciplinary.
0900:TR   DENNY 211
RELG 107-01 New Testament in Context
Instructor: Theodore Pulcini
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 107-01.
0930:MWF   STERN 103
RELG 215-01 Jewish Environmental Ethics
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 215-01 and JDST 215-01.
1030:TR   DENNY 211
RELG 241-01 American Jewish Literature
Instructor: Edward Merwin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 101-01 and JDST 216-02. We will read poetry, drama, fiction and essays from a variety of authors who write about the Jewish experience. Among the writers we will study are Abraham Cahan, Bernard Malamud, Anne Roiphe, Philip Roth, Neil Simon and Michael Chabon. We will examine multiple perspectives of what it means to be Jewish in America.
1330:MR   ASBELL SEM
RELG 247-01 Saints and Demons
Instructor: Shalom Staub
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 247-01 and MEST 250-01.
1330:TF   EASTC 405
RELG 250-01 God & Society
Instructor: Laurene Bowers
Course Description:
How does a concept of God inform a society's approach to contemporary social problems? This course examines a variety of concepts of god in relation to environmental concerns, e.g. global warming, poverty and equality.
1330:MR   EASTC 405
RELG 250-02 American Religious Diversity
Instructor: Beth Graybill
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 101-02. This course will investigate varied manifestations of religious practice in US culture. The material we study will challenge us to think about the role that ethics, spirituality and belief systems play in the lives of all of us, whether we consider ourselves religious or not. We will be treating the range of spiritual and religious practices as appropriate objects of respectful study, regardless of whether or not we personally agree with them, as we develop our understanding of religious pluralism. In this course we will be studying religion as it is actually experienced in people's everyday lives, a concept known as lived religion, as we seek to understand the ways in which individuals live out their beliefs and develop their spirituality. We will be asking: what can we learn about U.S. culture by looking at the religious understanidngs and practices of diverse Americans in the US today?
1330:MR   DENNY 104
RELG 250-03 PA Germans: Religion, Life & Culture
Instructor: Beth Graybill
Course Description:
This course is a critical examination of the history, ethnic and religious identities, basic beliefs, cultural practices, material culture, and contemporary manifestations of the diverse group known as the Pennsylvania Germans (sometimes referred to as the Pennsylvania Dutch). This includes both the Plain Peoples (most notably Old Order Mennonites and Amish), as well as the wider group of early Pennsylvania Protestant settlers of German ancestry (primarily Lutherans and Reformed) known as the Church Germans or the fancy Dutch. Unifying factors historically were the shared immigrant background, elements of material culture, and the dialect of low German, called Pennsylvania Dutch, an oral language retained by the Amish and Old Order Mennonites today. Differences were around economic class, religious practice, and urban vs. rural dynamics. Present-day similarities and differences will be compared and contrasted in this course as we seek to understand these unique members of the southeastern Pennsylvania cultural mosaic.
1500:MR   DENNY 104
RELG 260-01 Kabbalah
Instructor: Nitsa Kann
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 216-01.
0900:TR   EASTC 107
RELG 260-02 Comparative BioMedical Ethics
Instructor: Eric Cytryn
Course Description:
Advances in medical research have opened a new world of ethical questions dealing with the boundaries of life, reproduction, the allocation of scarce health care resources, and the right to refuse medical care for religious or cultural reasons. How does religion inform and respond to questions of bioethical concerns? In this course, which is comparative in perspective, we will explore how a variety of religious traditions approach the most critical issues in bioethics today.
1330:MR   DENNY 110
RELG 260-03 Religions of India
Instructor: Sughra Husain
Course Description:
(e.g., Islam; Shamanism; Apocrypha) Prerequisite dependent upon topic.
1230:MWF   DENNY 103
RELG 270-01 Middle Eastern Christianity: Its Rich Past, Its Uncertain Future
Instructor: Theodore Pulcini
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 270-01.
1330:MR   EASTC 102
RELG 490-01 Senior Seminar
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
Advanced investigation of methods and critical perspectives for the study of religion with a focus to be determined by the instructor. Writing enriched. Prerequisite: 390 or permission of the instructor.
1330:T   EASTC 312
RELG 500-01 God and Society
Instructor: Andrea Lieber
Course Description:
 
RELG 550-01 Neurotheology
Instructor: Teresa Barber
Course Description: