Past Themes

One College One Community Spring 2016

Spring 2016 Theme: America: From Politics to Pop Culture

In addition to our global mindset, Dickinsonians share a unique, multifaceted perspective on America. After all, this is the country whose founding inspired Benjamin Rush to forge Dickinson’s useful liberal-arts education. Social movements, art, music, business, law, movies, innovation—each provides a new lens through which we collectively view this country, its history and its future.

This spring, Dickinson’s One College One Community initiative invites members of the Dickinson community to come together to celebrate and deepen our uniquely Dickinsonian understanding of America through this national series of regional and on-campus events, each organized around the central theme, “America: From Politics to Pop Culture.”

From exploring civil rights though sports to re-examining the Civil War’s impact on slavery and fashion’s impact on politics, this semester’s theme offers you an opportunity to connect with other Dickinsonians as you learn more about the country that gave birth this college on what was then the American frontier.

 
  • San Francisco 
    Fat Shaming: Body Size Stigma in American Culture

    Join fellow Dickinsonians for a lunch presentation entitled, "Fat Shaming: Body Size Stigma in American Culture." Professor Amy Farrell, Ann and John Curley Chair of Liberal Arts and Professor of American Studies and Women's and Gender Studies; executive director of the Clarke Forum for Contemporary Issues at Dickinson College, will draw from her book Fat Shame to explore what body size shaming is, where it comes from, and why it's so dangerous. Her examples move from early 20th century postcards mocking fat people to contemporary television shows like The Biggest Loser, exploring why everyone should care about fat denigration and how it's connected to other forms of discrimination.

    Saturday, Feb. 20
    11 a.m. – 1 p.m.
    Hosted By Dr. Ira Glick '57 and Juannie Eng at their home in Sea Cliff


     
  • Pittsburgh
    Civil Rights Through Sports: A Pittsburgh Perspective

    Join fellow Dickinsonians in celebration of Black History Month! Andy Conte ’93 and Associate Professor Mike Roberts will present “Civil Rights Through Sports: A Pittsburgh Perspective.” Andy will discuss his book The Color of Sundays about how Bill Nunn, Jr. and the Pittsburgh Steelers broke down barriers for African-Americans, creating the greatest dynasty in NFL history. Roberts, biology professor, baseball historian and former Dickinson assistant baseball coach will discuss the impact Pittsburgh's Negro leagues baseball teams had on American history.  

    Sunday, Feb. 21
    2 – 4 p.m.

    Engine House #25
    Clemente Museum


     
  • Atlanta
    U.S. Foreign Policy: The Future of NATO after the Ukraine Crisis

    Georgia native, Andrew Wolff, associate professor of political science and international studies, for an interactive discussion about the future of NATO after the Ukraine Crisis. He will draw from his research on U.S. foreign and security policy to discuss how NATO has handled the Ukraine Crisis. He will also discuss the implications of Russian aggression in Ukraine on NATO policy.

    Friday, March 18
    7 - 9 p.m.
    Perkins + Will
    Hosted by Phil Harrison P'16 and Susan Stainback P'16


     
  • Chicago
    Therapeutic Beauty: American Art and the Culture of Health

    Join fellow Dickinsonians, accepted & enrolled students and families, and Elizabeth Lee, associate professor of art history, for a discussion entitled "Therapeutic Beauty: American Art and the Culture of Health." Professor Lee will expand on how artists in the late nineteenth century dealt with the threat of disease in modern cities by turning to nature, beauty and health. This is a great opportunity for incoming families to experience Dickinson firsthand.

    Wednesday, March 23
    6 - 8 p.m.

    Venue Six10
    Drinks and hors d'oeuvres will be provided.


     
  • Los Angeles
    Hopping Coasts: the Dickinson Experience and the Changing Landscape of College Admissions

    For many students just going to college is a big step. For those students willing to travel all the way across the country the experiences, opportunities and options are many but none quite like Dickinson College. Come hear from a panel of young alumni and current Dickinson administrators about the changing landscape of admissions in a discussion entitled, "Hopping Coasts: the Dickinson Experience and the Changing Landscape of College Admissions." They will talk about what it’s like to attend a nationally ranked, liberal arts college in Central Pennsylvania; and how a Dickinson education transforms the way students see the world.

    Saturday, March 26
    1 – 3 p.m.

    Ace Hotel Downtown Los Angeles (at 9th and Broadway)
    Segovia Hall
    929 South Broadway
    Los Angeles, CA 90015


     
  • Baltimore
    Who Will Be Next to Occupy the Oval Office?

    Join Jim Hoefler, professor of political science, for a discussion about the current presidential election, strategies and tactics of the candidates, and the prospective outcomes in the race to elect America’s 45th president.

    Professor Hoefler specializes in American politics and public policy and coordinates the Policy Studies program at Dickinson.

    Tuesday, March 29
    6–8 p.m.

    Orioles Pub at The Center Club
    100 Light Street 16th Floor
    Baltimore, MD 21202
    Drinks and hors d’oeuvres will be provided.


     
  • Philadelphia
    Everything They're Telling You is Wrong: A Political Scientist's Take on the 2016 Presidential Elections

    In this presentation, Assistant Professor of Political Science David O’Connell will expose all the mistaken assumptions political pundits make about presidential elections. He will explain how political scientists are able to predict winning candidates using just a few key pieces of information, and he’ll explore the impact of different campaign activities like debates, get-out-the-vote campaigns and TV ads. Particular attention will also be paid to understanding the candidacy of Donald Trump.

    Wednesday, March 30
    6 - 8 p.m.
    Law office of Montgomery McCracken Walker & Rhoads
    (Justice Roberts Room)
    Hosted by Craig Ziegler '76


     
  • Boston
    Who Will be Next to Occupy the Oval Office?

    Join Jim Hoefler, professor of political science, for a discussion about the current presidential election, strategies and tactics of the candidates, and the prospective outcomes in the race to elect America’s 45th president.

    Professor Hoefler specializes in American politics and public policy and coordinates the Policy Studies program at Dickinson. His research focuses end-of-life decision making, policies and practices.

    Sunday, May 1
    1 - 3 p.m.
    Wellesley College Club


     
  • New York City
    Media Bias and the Coverage of Presidential Elections

    Despite the large amount of political information available on cable television and the internet as compared to 20-30 years ago, political participation has not increased dramatically over the past generation. Today, most people tend to consume news and political information they already agree with, and the media have been blamed for increasing political polarization among voters. 

    Professor Sarah Niebler will explore topics related to media coverage of campaigns, specifically the 2016 presidential primary and upcoming general election. We will discuss issues of bias, polarization, political participation, and the role of mass media in the American political process. 

    Wednesday, May 18
    6:30 - 8:30 p.m.
    Remarks will begin at 7 p.m. A reception will follow.

    Union League Club
    38 East 37th St
    New York, NY 10016

    Hosted by Tom ’76 and Karen Welty Kalaris ‘77

    Business casual attire is required.


     
  • Washington, D.C.
    Did the end of the Civil War mean the end of slavery?

    Dickinson history professor Matthew Pinsker uses resources from the House Divided Project at Dickinson to show how leading participants from the Civil War era, including some notable Dickinsonians, debated this provocative question as the nation began its long troubled journey toward Reconstruction.

    Monday, May 23

    6 - 8 p.m.
    Army & Navy Club
     
  • Wilkes Barre, Pa.
    Media Bias and the Coverage of Presidential Elections
    with Assistant Professor Sarah Niebler

    Despite the large amount of political information available on cable television and the internet as compared to 20-30 years ago, political participation has not increased dramatically over the past generation. Today, most people tend to consume news and political information they already agree with, and the media have been blamed for increasing political polarization among voters.

    Professor Niebler will explore topics related to media coverage of campaigns, specifically the 2016 presidential primary and upcoming general election. We will think about issues of bias, polarization, political participation, and the role of mass media in the American political process.

    Tuesday, June 14
    6:30 – 8:30 p.m.

    Hosted by April Vinciarelli '99


Fall 2015 Theme: Causes and Consequences of Living in a Global Community

As members of a global community, we have greatly expanded our understanding of cross-national issues and perspectives over the last 50 years. Dickinsonians are constantly learning to confront the most critical challenges of our age at home and abroad. As we celebrate 50 years of global studies, join us for a series of conversations and panel discussions with Dickinson faculty that examine the causes and consequences of living in a global community. Faculty members will discuss themes and programs such as Dickinson’s mosaic programs, international security, ethnomusicology and community-based international heath. 


Spring 2015 Theme: Happy 

This past spring, the Dickinson community joined together for conversations around Happy, an award-winning documentary bringing together a wealth of scientific, empirical and national research on happiness. Dickinson first-year students along with upper-level mentors, faculty and staff watched the film during Orientation and the conversations haven’t stopped since.  

Dickinson faculty traveled across the country to expand the conversation around happines—several regional events are listed below. 

Watch Happy.

Happy Livestream with Director Rocko Belic


Fall 2014 Theme

One College One Community kicked off with conversations around Chasing Ice, a documentary by James Balog, recipient of the 2014 Sam Rose ’58 and Julie Walters Prize at Dickinson College for Global Environmental Activism.

During the fall semester, we brought the conversation to you during Homecoming & Family Weekend, a live stream and interactive discussion and regional events with faculty and students. 

About James Balog 

Placeholder

 

James Balog received the 2014 Sam Rose ’58 and Julie Walters Prize at Dickinson College for Global Environmental Activism at Commencement on Sunday, May 18. The prize was created to focus attention on the need to reduce the impact of human lives on the planet, particularly given the rising population predictions for this century, and Balog is the third recipient. Learn more