Students as Scholars

This page shows details of individual student projects, arranged by department(s) and/or offices in which the research occurred. Each entry describes the project, the outcomes, and a statement from the student about the research experience.

ALLARM

Danielle Marie Cioce (2008)

Burma Environmental Curriculum Development and Implementation

ALLARM has a unique opportunity to apply its work to an international context and to engage two ALLARM students in the process. ALLARM has been asked by EarthRights International, an environmental and human rights organization, to enhance the environmental curriculum for their capacity building school (Burma EarthRights School located in Chiang Mai, Thailand) for Burmese community leaders. This twelve month school's strengths lay in its human rights, international law, and democracy development curricula but lack a strong environmental curriculum. In the first year of collaboration, ALLARM will conduct research and develop teaching materials focused on farming, copper mining, and gold mining. ALLARM students and director will conduct research this fall, travel to Thailand to pilot the curriculum while conducting additional on-the-ground research, and finalize the curriculum for use by Burmese communities and the Burma EarthRights School. ALLARM is requesting support from R&D for the two ALLARM students' research and travel.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Julie Vastine


Vallie L Edenbo (2002)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Lauren Imgrund


Jack Wolbach Treichler (2008)

Burma Environmental Curriculum Development and Implementation

ALLARM has a unique opportunity to apply its work to an international context and to engage two ALLARM students in the process. ALLARM has been asked by EarthRights International, an environmental and human rights organization, to enhance the environmental curriculum for their capacity building school (Burma EarthRights School located in Chiang Mai, Thailand) for Burmese community leaders. This twelve month school's strengths lay in its human rights, international law, and democracy development curricula but lack a strong environmental curriculum. In the first year of collaboration, ALLARM will conduct research and develop teaching materials focused on farming, copper mining, and gold mining. ALLARM students and director will conduct research this fall, travel to Thailand to pilot the curriculum while conducting additional on-the-ground research, and finalize the curriculum for use by Burmese communities and the Burma EarthRights School. ALLARM is requesting support from R&D for the two ALLARM students' research and travel.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Julie Vastine


Africana Studies

Quinnelle Lilian Gomez (2010)

Caribbean Media Representations

The research project examines the representation in the media of Caribbean society in general, and specifically, of changes in the nature of interpersonal relations, attitudes toward the construction of national identities and national culture, and the relationship of the independent nation to former colonial powers and contemporary transnational dynamics that are viewed as evidence of cultural imperialism. The Dana Research Assistant will work with me to develop an archive of materials related to the study of Caribbean societies, identities, politics and performances. This will consist of work in the following areas: • Cataloging and coding material that has been collected on videotape from television in Trinidad; • Sorting, coding and filing newspaper clippings from Trinidad and Tobago; and • Creating an Endnote database of media materials and scholarly sources that will be used in the production of bibliographies for journal articles and book manuscripts that I will be developing in the next several years.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: Patricia van Leeuwaarde Moonsammy


American Studies

Sarah Elizabeth Barr (2011)

Manuscript revision project: "Home and Other Myths: A Lexicon of Queer Inhabitation"

This project explores the idea of "home" in contemporary queer lives, with home describing not only social, familial, national, and political spaces, but a psychic location as well. Drawing from Holocaust theorist Jean Amery's definition of home as the provision of comfort, security, and belonging, I argue that home occupies a central place - conceptually, ethically, politically, and literarily - for queer people. This project examines the ways in which queers have been cast out from various structures of home, and the pervasive types of violence that accompany these forcible dislocations. I expect to send this work out as a book proposal to Duke University Press, a prominent publisher in the field of queer studies by the end of May 2011. My intentions are to contribute to the fields of Queer Studies and American Studies through an analysis of narratives of belonging, identity, and cultural ethics, while also mentoring Sarah Barr in research methodology.

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: Laura Grappo


John Edward Costango (1993)

Student Co-direction of the Writing Component of the FOCUS program

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: John Bloom


Giancarlo Daniel Duffy (2014)

Visual Cultures of Internet Islamophobia: Transnational Memes and International Politics

"Visual Cultures of Internet Islamophobia" is intended to address a visual and transnational research gap in studies of Islamophobia. Part of a larger book project, this research explores anti-Muslim memes and images that travel online via social networking sites, such as Facebook, Tumblr, Reddit, and Pinterest. The first stage of the project, supported by a Fall 2012 Dana Research fellowship, involved online research on the English-language Internet to archive and code Islamophobic images, cartoons, and memes that are user-generated and circulate online in vernacular networks. In Spring 2013, my research will interrogate whether and how these images are received in Arabic-, Farsi-, and Turkish-speaking communities online. My preliminary research on countercultural Turkish Facebook groups identified some interesting uses for such images by Turkish atheist communities, such as translations, strategic cropping, and re-posting. The project will test the hypothesis that, given the abundance of offensive images online, outrage and protest, overemphasized through the discourse of "Muslim rage" by the Western media, cannot be the only way in which Muslims respond to Islamophobic digital media.

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Perin Gurel


Mary Ann Eggers (2013)

Visual Cultures of Internet Islamophobia

Visual Cultures of Internet Islamophobia is part of an on-going book project on transnational folk representations of Islam, tentatively titled Beyond Islamophobia. The research, intended to address a visual gap in studies of Islamophobia, explores anti-Muslim memes and images that travel online via social networking sites and email chains. The study recognizes the role images play in furthering negative feelings against Muslims and those who "look" Muslim. In addition to its emphasis on visual culture, this study is also unique in its focus on fluid folk cultures, as opposed to fixed media, published popular works, or intellectuals' accounts. Thus, it seeks to uncover the role played by vernacular, person-to-person, if anonymous, communication in the spread of "Islamophobia" in the United States and beyond. The Dana Research Assistant for this project will be responsible for conducting Internet-based research, data-compilation, and indexing.

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: Perin Gurel


Nasim Fekrat (2013)

Visual Cultures of Internet Islamophobia: Transnational Memes and International Politics

"Visual Cultures of Internet Islamophobia" is intended to address a visual and transnational research gap in studies of Islamophobia. Part of a larger book project, this research explores anti-Muslim memes and images that travel online via social networking sites, such as Facebook, Tumblr, Reddit, and Pinterest. The first stage of the project, supported by a Fall 2012 Dana Research fellowship, involved online research on the English-language Internet to archive and code Islamophobic images, cartoons, and memes that are user-generated and circulate online in vernacular networks. In Spring 2013, my research will interrogate whether and how these images are received in Arabic-, Farsi-, and Turkish-speaking communities online. My preliminary research on countercultural Turkish Facebook groups identified some interesting uses for such images by Turkish atheist communities, such as translations, strategic cropping, and re-posting. The project will test the hypothesis that, given the abundance of offensive images online, outrage and protest, overemphasized through the discourse of "Muslim rage" by the Western media, cannot be the only way in which Muslims respond to Islamophobic digital media.

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Perin Gurel


Gretchen Kemp Mielke (2006)

Fat America: A Cultural Study of Stigma, Weight Loss and the Fat Acceptance Movement

During the 2002-2003 academic year, I have conducted significant research and writing on my manuscript Fat America: A Cultural Study of Stigma, Weight Loss, and the Fat Acceptance Movement. Before the end of the summer I will send out a completed introduction, chapter outline and prospectus to agents and publishers who have expressed interest in my book. Currently over sixty percent of the U.S. population is medically defined as overweight or obese, a figure that alarms both medical practitioners and the general public. The purpose of Fat America is to elucidate the cultural myths and metaphors surrounding fatness - particularly the historical roots of our animosity - as well as the highly contradictory approaches of two camps who seek to cure our problems with obesity. In the first group are those who, since the late 19th century up through the present have, advocated diets, surgery, drugs and psychotherapy to make us thinner. In the second camp are the much less well-known, but highly eloquent, fat activists. This more recent group of women and men push for an acceptance of the fat body, an end to discrimination, and a rethinking of what constitutes health. I argue that it is only through such an exploration - of fat "stigma" and fat "cures" - that we will be able to move forward in our thinking about our national crisis over obesity.

Term Funded:Year 2004
Professor: Amy Farrell


Leah Judith Shafer (2014)

A Difference That Makes No Difference: Making Race Not Matter in Postwar America

I am excited at the prospect of working with Leah Shafer (AMST 2014) as my Dana Research Assistant for the Spring 2012 semester. The project for which I seek her assistance is called A Difference That Makes No Difference: Making Race Not Matter in Postwar America. Specifically, I will ask her to gather and organize prinary evidence and secondary sources on the formation of race as an ideology in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. This book-length study draws on several bodies of evidence to show from a variety of angles an endeavor undertaken by powerful American political, legal, media, educational, religious, and social institutions from the 1940s to the present: crafting and propagating a public sensibility that I call "aracialism." Aracialism offered a utopian vision of a liberal polity in which race ceased to be a determinant of Americans' life chances. Aracialism's signal element, however, was (and remains) its superficiality: its architects mostly sought to "disappear" race rather than to confront and redress the structural inequalities race served to normalize.

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Cotten Seiler


Jillian Audrey Smith (2004)

Republic of Drivers: Automobility and the Formation of the American Self

At present, I am writing a book proposal for submission to publishers by the end of the semester. The study, tentatively entitled "Republic of Drivers: Automobility and the Formation of the American Self," will show how the figure of the driver has provided a practical model for the dominant conceptions of individual selfhood in American intellectual and political culture, and will evaluate the consequences of that model. The automobile, connected explicitly by its advocates to discourses of American individualism has enjoyed a remarkable primacy in American transportation policy since the mid-twentieth century. I contend that this primacy has been subsidized by a liberal-capitalist regime that has privileged driving, as a salutary practice. Specifically, I argue that driving - highway driving in particular, with its sensations of freedom and anonymity and its procedural limitations - has functioned as a metaphor for American citizenship, with deleterious consequences to democracy.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Cotten Seiler


Rebecca Leigh Spiering (2003)

Norton Critical Edition of "O Pioneers!"

I have been asked to edit a Norton Critical Edition of Willa Cather's O Pioneers! The Norton Critical Editions gather a variety of contemporary contextual materials - - historical, cultural, economic, aesthetic - as well as important critical essays, along with the text of the novel. This is a prestigious and well-known series. This will be the first Norton edition of a novel by Willa Cather. I can use a research assistant most creatively and fully in tracking down appropriate contextual materials that will illuminate the historical contexts that shaped the production and the reception of Cather's novel. It will be necessary both to find and to read a range of possible sources before deciding on a final selection. For example, possible contexts for reading the novel include: the closing of the frontier; the experience of immigrant groups from France, Sweden, and Bohemia in Nebraska in the late nineteenth-century; early responses to Walt Whitman's poetry (the title is from Whitman); populist movements in the 19thc Midwest; popular entertainment (including opera and traveling plays) in the 19th century Midwest; Cather's autobiography; the place of the American writer and the role of American literature in the early 20th century; the suffrage movement; early reviews of the novel; later references to Cather's Nebraska by American writers; Nebraska's celebration and veneration of Cather at the present moment, contrasted to the reception of her work in Nebraska in the early 20th century.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Sharon O'Brien


James Yarnall Watson-Krips (2010)

The Impact of Automobility on Chinese Society, 1920-Present

This project is a historical study of automobility in China from the early twentieth century to the present. Building on and adding an international dimension to my book Republic of Drivers: A Cultural History of Automobility in the United States, 1895-1961 (forthcoming 2008 from the University of Chicago Press), I plan to conduct research on the transformations past, present, and future wrought by the automobile in China. I am particularly interested in how the sensations of personal freedom and agency created by driving will affect Chinese political culture. My hypothesis is that driving, and the middle-class prerogative of car ownership, will bring about a liberalization in Chinese society, and that the freedom of the driver will lead to a demand among the growing Chinese middle class for other, perhaps more substantive and explicitly political, types of freedom.

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: J. Cotten Seiler


Wuji Zeng (2012)

Chinese Automobility and U.S. Rhetorics of Identicality

Since the 1980s, China has developed its own apparatus of automobility, an interlocking set of economic, social, philosophical, legal, political, aesthetic structures and psychological dispositions that facilitate and normativize automobile use. This project analyzes the U.S./Western positioning of automobility as inevitably politically transformational. I plan to argue that, despite anxieties over an automobilized China's growing appetite for resources (particularly petroleum) and potentially catastrophic greenhouse gas output, the political valence of automobility-its supposedly manifest capacity to engender liberal political subjects-earns Chinese automobility the strong endorsement of most mainstream media in the United States. A diverse range of sources asserts automobility to be doing a sort of missionary work, fostering feelings of individual autonomy, agency, and choice that will eventually impact the Chinese state and society, rendering them "identical: to those of the United States. Zuji Weng will be able to access and translate the Mandarin-language sources (newspapers, magazines, and websites, as well as scholarly work) that will enrich the narrative of Chinese automobility beyond the optimistic and nationalistic sentiments expressed by most U.S. sources.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: J. Cotten Seiler


Anthropology

Leslie Thigpen Archer (1993)

Ethnobotany of North Baffin Island Inuit

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: Kristen Borre


Christina Joy Bergen (2008)

Anthropology Internship funded by W.M. Keck Foundation

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Karen Weinstein


Katherine W Clark (2012)

Preliminary Analysis of the Human Skeletal Remains from Neale's Landing (site 46WD39), Blennerhassett Island, West Virginia

I am applying for a Dana Research Assistant for spring 2012 to support a student to collaborate with me on the preliminary analysis of the human skeletal remains from a prehistoric archaeological site, Neale's Landing, West Virginia, that is on loan to the Department of Anthropology from the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). If funded, the Dana research assistant and I will conduct preliminary analysis of the human skeletal remains to determine the minimum number of individuals that are represented in these burials, their age and sex composition, and their health and disease profiles using standard human osteology analytical procedures. The results of this investigation will be presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists and will ideally lead to future student-faculty research projects of the human skeletal remains from this site.

Term Funded: 2011
Professor: Karen Weinstein


Eric Scott Diehl (1997)

Social Stratification Among the Yi of SW China

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1995
Professor: Ann Hill


Eric Scott Diehl (1997)

Social Stratification Among the Yi of SW China

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1995
Professor: Ann Hill


Luke Thomas Donohue (2012)

Preliminary Analysis of the Human Skeletal Remains from Neale's Landing (site 46WD39), Blennerhassett Island, West Virginia

I am applying for a Dana Research Assistant for spring 2012 to support a student to collaborate with me on the preliminary analysis of the human skeletal remains from a prehistoric archaeological site, Neale's Landing, West Virginia, that is on loan to the Department of Anthropology from the Smithsonian Institution's National Museum of Natural History (NMNH). If funded, the Dana research assistant and I will conduct preliminary analysis of the human skeletal remains to determine the minimum number of individuals that are represented in these burials, their age and sex composition, and their health and disease profiles using standard human osteology analytical procedures. The results of this investigation will be presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists and will ideally lead to future student-faculty research projects of the human skeletal remains from this site.

Term Funded: 2011
Professor: Karen Weinstein


Christopher Edward Gagne (1998)

Behavior and Ecology of Chimpanzees in SE Cameroon

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: Ellen Ingmanson


Ashley Anne Gruszecki (2007)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Year 2007
Professor: Kjell Enge


Kaitlin Mae Irvine (2010)

Hereditary Status Groups and Neoliberal Reforms in Ethiopia

This proposal is for a Spring 2008 Dana Research Assistant to assist with my book proposal concerning political and economic changes and the everyday lives of people in hereditary status groups in Ethiopia, stemming from my 2001-2002 fieldwork. The book proposal will comprise a prospectus, draft introduction, and four sample chapters, which I will submit for review by the end of the spring semester or the summer of 2008. Southern Ethiopia is characterized by hereditary divisions between dominant farmers and despised traders and craftworkers (including blacksmiths, hideworkers, weavers, and potters). Whereas scholars have characterized these categories as "castes" and assumed their historical persistence, my research examines their contingency and entanglement with forces of political economy. The Dana Research Assistant will work with me to locate and request sources, update and annotate a master bibliography, and crosscheck interview transcripts, audio recordings, field notes, and photographs from the Ethiopia fieldwork.

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: James Ellison


Erin Lucia Mead (2005)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Year 2005
Professor: Kjell Enge


Erin Lucia Mead (2005)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Kjell Enge


Amy Marie Oechsner (2010)

Geoarchaeology at Joara and Fort San Juan: Colonialism and Household Practice at the Berry Site, North Carolina

Support for a Dana Research Assistantship is requested to assist in the final analysis of geoarchaeological samples derived from a significant 16th century Native American and Spanish Colonial archaeological site. An interdisciplinary research team demonstrated that the Berry site, a 12 acre Mississippian Period site dating to the 15th and 16th centuries A.D. is likely that of Fort San Juan and Joara, the center of an important Chiefdom where Juan Pardo's soldiers resided for a year in 1567. The fort includes at least five burned structures which offer a unique opportunity to examine a well preserved archaeological context where native people were dominant to Europeans, as the Spanish were significantly out numbered and dependent on the natives for food and hospitality for a year. The Dana Research Assistant will contribute to the larger study by analyzing microartifact samples from the floor of the burned structures to interpret how they were used and by whom.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: Sarah Sherwood


Bradley Ryan Roller (2012)

Analysis of Data from the 2011 Tanzania Field School: Health and Nutrition in an Interconnected World

This proposal requests Dana research assistant funding to employ Mr. Bradley Roller from July 18th to August 26th to help organize and analyze data from our 2011 ethnographic field school in Tanzania. Professors Weinstein and Ellison, both of the Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, take Dickinson students to eastern Africa to teach them fieldwork methods in a rural community. The field school examines how rural people's subsistence, economic activities, and health are connected with broad political and economic changes. The Dana-funded assistant would help analyze fieldwork data, permitting us to present findings at conferences, in publication, and in grant proposals.

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: James Ellison


Mindy Suzanne Rupley (2008)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Kjell Enge


Mindy Suzanne Rupley (2008)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Year 2007
Professor: Kjell Enge


Gabrielle A Russo (2006)

Body proportions and human biological diversity in pre-Contact Americas

This proposal requests funds to support a Dana research assistantship for student-faculty research in biological anthropology. The research project seeks to compare body proportions of ancient human skeletal remains from diverse environments in the Americas in order to assess the degree of biological diversity present within these populations. The student research assistant will be responsible for identifying, locating, and extracting osteological data from published sources, conducting literature reviews of the archaeological populations that form the basis of this project, and, with faculty supervision, collecting primary data from human skeletal remains. This research project will contribute to the growing scholarly literature about biological adaptations in human prehistory in general and in pre-contact North and South American populations in particular. The outcome of this project includes a student-faculty coauthored presentation at a national anthropology conference.

Term Funded:Year 2005
Professor: Karen Weinstein


Jenny R Weisenbeck (2006)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Year 2005
Professor: Kjell Enge


Jenny R Weisenbeck (2006)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Kjell Enge


Wuji Zeng (2012)

Translating and Interpreting China's Southwestern Frontier

The research assistantship proposed here builds on my sabbatical research in fall 2009 on frontier violence and social integration in China. I am requesting six weeks support for Wuji Zeng to do the following: 1) to locate primary, somewhat unorthodox sources in Chinese on China's southwestern frontier in the 1920s, 30s and 40s, in particular, memoirs, diaries, reports (the raw, eye-witness research reports usually submitted to gov't agencies), Guomindang reminiscences, local stories and folklore, etc.; 2) to compile an annotated bibliography of these sources for my review, a selection of which we will translate; 3) translation of a long recorded interview in a local dialect of Chinese made during my sabbatical; 4) completion of a 10-page essay by Wuji on Nuosu-Han relations, including their respective view s on "race" and "ethnicity," based on the materials he has read and translated. Wuji is an anthropology major (and my advisee) interested in issues of race, prejudice, and nationalism.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Ann Hill


Anthropology, Archaeology

Daniel Ezekiel Ehrlich (2013)

Auditory Exostosis and Enamel Hypoplasia in the Human Skeletal Remains from Neale's Landing, Blennerhessett Island, West Virginia

A Dana research assistantship will aid my investigations of two specific pathological conditions in the human skeletal remains from Neale's Landing, Blennerhesset Island, West Virginia. First, I plan to prepare a journal article that reports the presence of bilateral auditory exostoses, a rare and unusual pathological condition in the archaeological record of the Ohio River Valley that signifies repetitive immersion in cold water and illuminates the riverine-based diet of this ancient population. Second, I plan to investigate the high rate of infant mortality in this population by examining the prevalence of enamel hypoplasia, developmental defects of tooth enamel that result from nutritional stress during infancy and young childhood. My students and I will then present the results of the enamel hypoplasia study at the 2014 meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Karen Weinstein


William Hardy Kochtitzky (2016)

NASA GCCE Grant: Agricultural & Ecological Impacts of the Tiwanaku State on the Taraco Peninsula, Bolivia (AD 400-1150) and Climate Change & Ancient Agricultural Production on the Taraco Peninsula, Bolivia

Agricultural & Ecological Impacts of the Tiwanaku State on the Taraco Peninsula, Bolivia (AD 400-1150) and Climate Change & Ancient Agricultural Production on the Taraco Peninsula, Bolivia.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Maria Bruno


Chloe Monet Miller (2015)

NASA GCCE Grant: Agricultural & Ecological Impacts of the Tiwanaku State on the Taraco Peninsula, Bolivia (AD 400-1150) and Climate Change & Ancient Agricultural Production on the Taraco Peninsula, Bolivia

Agricultural & Ecological Impacts of the Tiwanaku State on the Taraco Peninsula, Bolivia (AD 400-1150) and Climate Change & Ancient Agricultural Production on the Taraco Peninsula, Bolivia

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Maria Bruno


Christopher Henry Wolf (2014)

Auditory Exostosis and Enamel Hypoplasia in the Human Skeletal Remains from Neale's Landing, Blennerhessett Island, West Virginia

A Dana research assistantship will aid my investigations of two specific pathological conditions in the human skeletal remains from Neale's Landing, Blennerhesset Island, West Virginia. First, I plan to prepare a journal article that reports the presence of bilateral auditory exostoses, a rare and unusual pathological condition in the archaeological record of the Ohio River Valley that signifies repetitive immersion in cold water and illuminates the riverine-based diet of this ancient population. Second, I plan to investigate the high rate of infant mortality in this population by examining the prevalence of enamel hypoplasia, developmental defects of tooth enamel that result from nutritional stress during infancy and young childhood. My students and I will then present the results of the enamel hypoplasia study at the 2014 meeting of the American Association of Physical Anthropologists.

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Karen Weinstein


Archaeology

Sarah Alison Eisen (2015)

Dickinson's G.I.S./3-D Mycenae Project

An archaeological excavation and publication of such complexity and scale requires interdisciplinary research, collaboration, and high-end digital technology. A key component for effective research and publication is the Mycenae G.I.S. geodatabase. This complex geodatabase will be designed to combine several spatial and non-spatial interfaces in order to facilitate the study of horizontal spatial distribution and vertical stratigraphic sequence of ruins and finds, and help investigate the dynamics between the cultural remains and the natural environment. Concurrently, the buildings and the valley of the Lower Town will be digitally 3-D modelled by specialists; 1,000 artifacts will be selected, 3-D scanned, studied at the Mycenae museum, and uploaded in the G.I.S. database by Sarah Eisen (Dickinson student, archaeology lab assistant) under my direct supervision. Both digital projects will be hosted on the Dickinson website to become pioneer research platforms for scholars worldwide as well as valuable teaching and learning tools. (a) Both digital projects will facilitate our archaeological research at Mycenae immensely; they will also accompany and enhance the printed publications of our excavations at Mycenae. Furthermore, these digital projects will become a ground-breaking, live, dynamic, and interactive digital publication beyond the printed volumes, as they will be continuously maintained, modified, and expanded by our students with new data and scholarly interpretations.(b) Both digital projects will become valuable teaching and learning tools. Our students will be actively involved at every stage of their development: creation, maintenance, expansion, thus enhancing their skills in digital applications in archaeology and their critical thinking in interpreting archaeological contexts. Both digital projects will also benefit our curriculum, since they will be used as teaching tools in G.I.S. classes and will be fully integrated in the new senior seminar, a core course for the archaeology major (ARCH 390 "Advanced Studies in Archaeology: Ancient Cities: Mycenae").

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Christofilis Maggidis


Art & Art History

Orelia Elizabeth Dann (2005)

Manuscript preparation for: Symbolism and Modern Urban Society, and Art, Culture and National Identity in Fin-de Siecle Europe

I would like to apply for a New Dana Assistantship for this academic year for the job of "manuscript preparation." The primary manuscript in preparation for the fall term is Symbolism and Modern Urban Society, a book (c. 600 typescript pages) under contract to Cambridge University Press, due December 2002. The book's text is completed, but much work remains on endnotes, bibliography, rechecking facts, and especially obtaining and organizing all illustrations (there will be nearly 200, all of which must go to Press with photographs, copies, and permissions). For these remaining tasks, an assistant would be conducting library and web research, copy editing and proofreading, locating illustrations, organizing bibliographic entries, and handling formal correspondence with various museums and collections around the world. A secondary project for the fall term would be helping to proof the galleys of another book that I have co-edited, on Art, Culture and National Identity in Fin-de-Siecle Europe, also for Cambridge, which is currently in press. Because this book contains only two chapters written by me plus ten other chapters by ten different authors, the proofing should also involve correspondence with the other authors, rechecking illustration captions, etc. with them. If the galleys arrive by November as promised, then they too would be due in December.

Term Funded:Fall 2002
Professor: Sharon Hirsh


Erin Nicole Kauffman (2006)

Modernism's Everyday Object

This book will investigate the role of the household object - from overlooked quotidian items to enshrined objects of induced nostalgia - in the visual arts of Western Europe at the turn of the twentieth century. It will trace the significance of the common household object in avant-garde painting and sculture from Post-Impressionist interiors and still lives (of Neo-Impressionists, Symbolists, and Cezanne) through Fauve interiors, and culminating in Cubist and Dada constructions and the readymades of Duchamp. It will explore why these objects held such fascination for artists living and working in fast-paced modern metropolises. Reacting to a variety of social impulses related to urbanization, mechanization, and consumerism, while adhering to new aesthetic theories dealing with space, sensation, and empathetic response, artists embraced domestic objects as complex, and often conflicted, signifers of art's social and even spiritual goals.

Term Funded:Year 2006
Professor: Sharon Hirsh


Nora Marisa Mueller (2005)

Manuscript preparation for: Symbolism and Modern Urban Society, and Art, Culture and National Identity in Fin-de Siecle Europe

I would like to apply for a New Dana Assistantship for this academic year for the job of "manuscript preparation." The primary manuscript in preparation for the fall term is Symbolism and Modern Urban Society, a book (c. 600 typescript pages) under contract to Cambridge University Press, due December 2002. The book's text is completed, but much work remains on endnotes, bibliography, rechecking facts, and especially obtaining and organizing all illustrations (there will be nearly 200, all of which must go to Press with photographs, copies, and permissions). For these remaining tasks, an assistant would be conducting library and web research, copy editing and proofreading, locating illustrations, organizing bibliographic entries, and handling formal correspondence with various museums and collections around the world. A secondary project for the fall term would be helping to proof the galleys of another book that I have co-edited, on Art, Culture and National Identity in Fin-de-Siecle Europe, also for Cambridge, which is currently in press. Because this book contains only two chapters written by me plus ten other chapters by ten different authors, the proofing should also involve correspondence with the other authors, rechecking illustration captions, etc. with them. If the galleys arrive by November as promised, then they too would be due in December.

Term Funded:Year 2002
Professor: Sharon Hirsh


Biochemistry & Molecular Biology

Aboluwade O Ayodele (2005)

Determination of Disinfection By-Products (DBP) from the chlorination of macro-molecules and bio-molecules in drinking water supplies. Dr. Brian Halsall, University of Cincinnati

It has been shown that chlorination of certain proteins is a major factor in atherosclerosis. Chlorination of water supplies is a convenient and economical form of disinfecting drinking water supplies. Water chlorination breaks down macro-molecules and bio-molecules and kills pathogens and other microorganisms in the water. This results in an accumulation of a wide variety of Disinfectant By-Products (DBP). Despite the popularity of disinfecting water supplies with chlorine, the actual mechanisms involved in the disinfection processes are widely unknown. Chlorine dissociates in water to yield Hypochlorous acid and Hypochlorite. These and chloramines are the main oxidizing species that produce the varios DBP. Some of these DBP have been identified and recognized as having carcinogenic propeeties and reproductive and developmental effects on animals. A study of the chlorination of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids will provide great insight into the nature of the various DBP present in our drinking water supplies and also allow us to identify and predict the DBP inn our drinking water supplies. We will be determining the mechansims involved in the chlorination processes of various macro-molecules and bio-molecules in different environmental conditions that reflect the various water conditions at different stages of water purification and distribution.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor:


Megan Christine Blair (2002)

Identifying molecules for the treatment of diabetes

In working with Dr. Jeffrey Toney in the Endocrinology and Chemical Biology department of Merck Research Laboratories, I will be exposed to a multidisciplinary approach to drug discovery. I hope to explore new techniques to identify small molecules for the treatment of diabetes. This internship will involve finding new technologies that offer higher sensitivity and do not use radioactivity. If successful, the new technology could be applied to high throughput screening (HTS) of Merck's chemical collection. HTS has proven to be a highly valuable approach to quickly identifying potential compounds which possess specific biochemical activity. The most active compounds can then be tested in whole cell assays, and, if specific and highly potent, can be tested in animal models of human disease. As an intern, I will attend project team meetings and will present my results to regular departmental review of projects. I also hope to present my findings at a national meeting.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor:


Thanprakorn Chiramanewong (2013)

Cellular Response of Leukemia Cells to an Alkyne-Modified Parthenolide Derivative

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Gregory Alan Clark (2014)

Microwave Ritter Reaction

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: R. David Crouch


Aaron A Cook (2015)

Purification and Characterization of BAG5

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Gabriel J DiNatale (2014)

Cellular Effects of Parthenolide Analogs

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Damien Garbett (2003)

Study of Epidermal Growth Factor and Ca2 Efflux in Mammalian Oocyte

My summer internship will involve researching the roles of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and Ca2 effluxes from mammalian oocytes and cumulus cells. This will be my first opportunity to conduct lab research outside of a class setting. The research will be conducted with Dr. David Gross in the Lederle Graduate Research Center at the University of Massachusetss in Amherst. My role in this research will involve performing cell cultures, fluorescence microscopy, and various other biochemical techniques. Working in the lab will enhance my understanding of molecular biology and biochemistry in addition to providing me with valuable lab experience. Also, because the lab personnel consists only of Dr. Gross, myself, and one other post-grad student; I will spend my time in lab conducting meaningful tasks, not trivial chores. Overall this research opportunity will provide me with experience and knowledge that will help me achieve my ambitions of working in a pharmaceutical laboratory.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor:


Breanna Sophie Goldner (2014)

Protein Engineering of Molecular Chaperone BAG5

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Beth Ellen Halle (2002)

Demonstration of the scaffolding function of the protein Ksr in linking Raf, ERK, and MEK in the MAP kinase signaling pathway./Role of the Scaffolding Protein Ksr in Activation of the MAP Kinase Pathway. (????Not sure which title is correct)

The MAP kinase pathway is a major intracellular signaling pathway which links growth hormone binding to changes in gene expression and results in an increase in cell proliferation. Three important proteins which serve to help activate this pathway are the proteins Raf-1, MEK and ERK 1/2. Recently the scaffolding protein Ksr has been shown to link these proteins together into a functional complex that binds to phosphatidic acid. This study will examine the effect of site-specific mutagenesis of Ksr on the ability of this protein to serve as an activating scaffold for Raf, MEK and ERK. The results should provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying cellular proliferative responses.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor:


Jonathan William Jackson (2014)

Microwave Ritter Reaction

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: R. David Crouch


Kira Marie Krivy (2005)

The role of centrosomal NuMA in multipolar spindles in cancer cells. Dr. Williams Saunders Laboratory, University of Pittsburgh.

Chromosomes are normally segregated during mitosis with very high fidelity. Loss of individual chromosomes typically occurs at less than one in a hundred thousand cell divisions. This high accuracy is ensured by the spindle apparatus, a transitory microtubule-based structure that appears and disappears in eukaryotic cells during cell division. Defects in spindle function, such as the occurrence of multipolar spindles, can lead to a much higher frequency of chromosomes loss or nondisjunction. The genomic instability resulting from these spindle defects may increase the likelihood that the defective cell will become a cancerous cell or lead to birth defects in the next generation. Recent research has determined that a reduction of NuMA with RNAi expression knockdown leads to the elimination of multipolar spindles in cancer cells. This project will utilize immumofluorescent microscopy, construction of DNA expression vectors, and RNAi inhibition of gene expression to specifically investigate whether the overexpression of centrosomal NuMA alone is enough to cause multipolarity.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor:


Jennifer Lynn Majchrzak (2004)

Application of Ionic Liquids to the Deprotection of Silyl Ethers.

That project which Jenn will focus on for the remainder of her time as a Beckman Scholar is the synthesis of cyclopropane-containing adrenergic agents. Although the synthetic scheme is relatively straightforward, the sequence of steps and the precise conditions for each of those steps needed to be worked out. Jenn focused on three specific steps: the Suzuki coupling needed to build the biaryl fragment of the target, the cyclopropanation reaction needed to convert an alkene into the desired cyclopropyl group and the formation of the imidazoline ring required for binding to the adrenergic receptor. By the end of the summer, Jenn had determined that cyclopropanation was best achieved through a "cycling" of the reaction mixture through multiple reactions. Since the reaction does not go to completion and the reactant alkene is nearly impossible to separate from the cyclopropanated product, the best result was gained by exposing the a quantity of alkene to diazomethane and Pd(II) catalyst three times. She also found conditions that will allow the coupling of arylboronic acid to bromobenzaldehyde in high yield. The imidazoline formation is the last piece of the puzzle and when that reaction is developed, Jenn should be able to begin preparing some of the analogs. At this stage of the project, it is difficult to determine how her lab experience as a Beckman Scholar will impact Jenn's future. Clearly, she is already thinking like a scientist, asking questions and beginning to come up with her own ideas about reactions such as why they sometimes fail and developing possible solutions to make them work. She is performing her own literature searches. Jenn has also grown considerably in the lab. She has become quite adept at separating the components of complex mixtures and handling relatively sensitive reagents.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: David Crouch


Jennifer Lynn Majchrzak (2004)

Application of Ionic Liquids to the Deprotection of Silyl Ethers.

That project which Jenn will focus on for the remainder of her time as a Beckman Scholar is the synthesis of cyclopropane-containing adrenergic agents. Although the synthetic scheme is relatively straightforward, the sequence of steps and the precise conditions for each of those steps needed to be worked out. Jenn focused on three specific steps: the Suzuki coupling needed to build the biaryl fragment of the target, the cyclopropanation reaction needed to convert an alkene into the desired cyclopropyl group and the formation of the imidazoline ring required for binding to the adrenergic receptor. By the end of the summer, Jenn had determined that cyclopropanation was best achieved through a "cycling" of the reaction mixture through multiple reactions. Since the reaction does not go to completion and the reactant alkene is nearly impossible to separate from the cyclopropanated product, the best result was gained by exposing the a quantity of alkene to diazomethane and Pd(II) catalyst three times. She also found conditions that will allow the coupling of arylboronic acid to bromobenzaldehyde in high yield. The imidazoline formation is the last piece of the puzzle and when that reaction is developed, Jenn should be able to begin preparing some of the analogs. At this stage of the project, it is difficult to determine how her lab experience as a Beckman Scholar will impact Jenn's future. Clearly, she is already thinking like a scientist, asking questions and beginning to come up with her own ideas about reactions such as why they sometimes fail and developing possible solutions to make them work. She is performing her own literature searches. Jenn has also grown considerably in the lab. She has become quite adept at separating the components of complex mixtures and handling relatively sensitive reagents.

Term Funded:Year 2004
Professor: David Crouch


Jennifer Lynn Majchrzak (2004)

Application of Ionic Liquids to the Deprotection of Silyl Ethers.

That project which Jenn will focus on for the remainder of her time as a Beckman Scholar is the synthesis of cyclopropane-containing adrenergic agents. Although the synthetic scheme is relatively straightforward, the sequence of steps and the precise conditions for each of those steps needed to be worked out. Jenn focused on three specific steps: the Suzuki coupling needed to build the biaryl fragment of the target, the cyclopropanation reaction needed to convert an alkene into the desired cyclopropyl group and the formation of the imidazoline ring required for binding to the adrenergic receptor. By the end of the summer, Jenn had determined that cyclopropanation was best achieved through a "cycling" of the reaction mixture through multiple reactions. Since the reaction does not go to completion and the reactant alkene is nearly impossible to separate from the cyclopropanated product, the best result was gained by exposing the a quantity of alkene to diazomethane and Pd(II) catalyst three times. She also found conditions that will allow the coupling of arylboronic acid to bromobenzaldehyde in high yield. The imidazoline formation is the last piece of the puzzle and when that reaction is developed, Jenn should be able to begin preparing some of the analogs. At this stage of the project, it is difficult to determine how her lab experience as a Beckman Scholar will impact Jenn's future. Clearly, she is already thinking like a scientist, asking questions and beginning to come up with her own ideas about reactions such as why they sometimes fail and developing possible solutions to make them work. She is performing her own literature searches. Jenn has also grown considerably in the lab. She has become quite adept at separating the components of complex mixtures and handling relatively sensitive reagents.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: David Crouch


Jennifer Lynn Majchrzak (2004)

Application of Ionic Liquids to the Deprotection of Silyl Ethers.

That project which Jenn will focus on for the remainder of her time as a Beckman Scholar is the synthesis of cyclopropane-containing adrenergic agents. Although the synthetic scheme is relatively straightforward, the sequence of steps and the precise conditions for each of those steps needed to be worked out. Jenn focused on three specific steps: the Suzuki coupling needed to build the biaryl fragment of the target, the cyclopropanation reaction needed to convert an alkene into the desired cyclopropyl group and the formation of the imidazoline ring required for binding to the adrenergic receptor. By the end of the summer, Jenn had determined that cyclopropanation was best achieved through a "cycling" of the reaction mixture through multiple reactions. Since the reaction does not go to completion and the reactant alkene is nearly impossible to separate from the cyclopropanated product, the best result was gained by exposing the a quantity of alkene to diazomethane and Pd(II) catalyst three times. She also found conditions that will allow the coupling of arylboronic acid to bromobenzaldehyde in high yield. The imidazoline formation is the last piece of the puzzle and when that reaction is developed, Jenn should be able to begin preparing some of the analogs. At this stage of the project, it is difficult to determine how her lab experience as a Beckman Scholar will impact Jenn's future. Clearly, she is already thinking like a scientist, asking questions and beginning to come up with her own ideas about reactions such as why they sometimes fail and developing possible solutions to make them work. She is performing her own literature searches. Jenn has also grown considerably in the lab. She has become quite adept at separating the components of complex mixtures and handling relatively sensitive reagents.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: David Crouch


Jennifer Lynn Majchrzak (2004)

Application of Ionic Liquids to the Deprotection of Silyl Ethers.

That project which Jenn will focus on for the remainder of her time as a Beckman Scholar is the synthesis of cyclopropane-containing adrenergic agents. Although the synthetic scheme is relatively straightforward, the sequence of steps and the precise conditions for each of those steps needed to be worked out. Jenn focused on three specific steps: the Suzuki coupling needed to build the biaryl fragment of the target, the cyclopropanation reaction needed to convert an alkene into the desired cyclopropyl group and the formation of the imidazoline ring required for binding to the adrenergic receptor. By the end of the summer, Jenn had determined that cyclopropanation was best achieved through a "cycling" of the reaction mixture through multiple reactions. Since the reaction does not go to completion and the reactant alkene is nearly impossible to separate from the cyclopropanated product, the best result was gained by exposing the a quantity of alkene to diazomethane and Pd(II) catalyst three times. She also found conditions that will allow the coupling of arylboronic acid to bromobenzaldehyde in high yield. The imidazoline formation is the last piece of the puzzle and when that reaction is developed, Jenn should be able to begin preparing some of the analogs. At this stage of the project, it is difficult to determine how her lab experience as a Beckman Scholar will impact Jenn's future. Clearly, she is already thinking like a scientist, asking questions and beginning to come up with her own ideas about reactions such as why they sometimes fail and developing possible solutions to make them work. She is performing her own literature searches. Jenn has also grown considerably in the lab. She has become quite adept at separating the components of complex mixtures and handling relatively sensitive reagents.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: David Crouch


Jennifer Lynn Majchrzak (2004)

Application of Ionic Liquids to the Deprotection of Silyl Ethers.

That project which Jenn will focus on for the remainder of her time as a Beckman Scholar is the synthesis of cyclopropane-containing adrenergic agents. Although the synthetic scheme is relatively straightforward, the sequence of steps and the precise conditions for each of those steps needed to be worked out. Jenn focused on three specific steps: the Suzuki coupling needed to build the biaryl fragment of the target, the cyclopropanation reaction needed to convert an alkene into the desired cyclopropyl group and the formation of the imidazoline ring required for binding to the adrenergic receptor. By the end of the summer, Jenn had determined that cyclopropanation was best achieved through a "cycling" of the reaction mixture through multiple reactions. Since the reaction does not go to completion and the reactant alkene is nearly impossible to separate from the cyclopropanated product, the best result was gained by exposing the a quantity of alkene to diazomethane and Pd(II) catalyst three times. She also found conditions that will allow the coupling of arylboronic acid to bromobenzaldehyde in high yield. The imidazoline formation is the last piece of the puzzle and when that reaction is developed, Jenn should be able to begin preparing some of the analogs. At this stage of the project, it is difficult to determine how her lab experience as a Beckman Scholar will impact Jenn's future. Clearly, she is already thinking like a scientist, asking questions and beginning to come up with her own ideas about reactions such as why they sometimes fail and developing possible solutions to make them work. She is performing her own literature searches. Jenn has also grown considerably in the lab. She has become quite adept at separating the components of complex mixtures and handling relatively sensitive reagents.

Term Funded:Year 2004
Professor: David Crouch


Dana R McGregor (2002)

Yeast Two-Hybrid Interactions Between NAC Proteins and other Trsncription Factor Encoding Genes in Arabidopsis

This research project is being performed as part of a Europe-wide initiative to determine the function of transcription factors in the plant Arabidopsis (the project is termed REGIA which stands for Regulatory Gene Initiative in Arabidopsis). Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins which regulate the expression (transcription) of DNA genes into messenger RNA which is then translated into proteins. Knowing the function of TFs will help decifer how this plant controls the expression of its genes. This specific project focuses on the NAC family of TFs and the yeast two-hybrid method will be used to help determine their function. The project will use cDNA cloning and PCR technology in order to produce the constructs needed for the two-hybrid assay. The work will be performed at the John Innes Center, one of the best plant molecular biology institutes in the world.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor:


Jennifer L Miller-Picarsic (2003)

Development of Gene Tissue for Early Lung Cancer using novel invitro model of lung cancer

The Pittsburgh Tissue Engineering Initiative (PTEI) is an engineering growth project, which is playing a key role in the advancement and education of biomedical research, both locally and internationally. In 1997, the PTEI established a summer internship program for undergraduate students from Southwestern Peensylvanian counties, for students who are persuing future caeer goals in medicine, engineering, research, or related fields. Each intern is paired with his/her research mentor at one of PTEI's six funded hospitals or universities. During the 10-week internship (contingent upon receiving HHMI grant), I would be working with Joseph M Pilewski, MD of the Unviersity of Pittsburgh Biomedical Center. I would engage in research focused on using gene vectors in an originally designed in vitro lung caner model of normal and malignant lung cancer cells, to test for genes that could abolish malignant cells while preserving the normal cell lining.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor:


Christine Brooke Neville (2014)

Investigation of Actin Nucleation Factors and Cytoskeletal Structure in Mouse Melanoma Cells

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: John Henson


Faith Melissa Peluso (2003)

Interactions between virus and hairpin promoters in the Turnip Crinkle Virus

The turnip crinkle virus (TCV) is a RNA virus with a number of small subviral RNAs associated with it. The subviral RNAs depend on the main viral enzymes to replicate. One specific subviral RNA strand contains the TCV virus and another set of genes called satC, both of which are replicated by the main virus, starting at a region called the promotor region. When the hairpin promoters for satC and TCV are switched, it affects the ability of TCV to replicate them and produce symptoms in plants. Occasionally though, a TCV virus is found to be replicating well, possibly due to a second site mutation elsewhere in the virus. This project is to attempt to discover where the mutation is in the viral RNA. To accomplish this goal, a full length copy of the mutant virus will be cloned and transcripts produced in the lab used to inoculate plants. If the virus produces symptoms, the original clone will be sequenced to find the mutation. Since there will likely be a number of mutations, each will be reengineered into the original TCV with the 3-prime end of satC virus. This information will be used to create a model to determine if the section containing the mutation is interacting with the hairpin promoter on the 3-prime end to cause the virus to replicate better.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor:


Kayla J Robinson (2013)

Inestifations of Microwave Assisted Orthoester Claisen Rearrangements

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: R. David Crouch


Jennifer M Rothberg (2006)

The Diadenosine Polyphospatase "Invasion" homolog in Agrobacterium Tumefaciens. Dr. Suzanne O'Handley, Rochester Institute of Technology

Despite the rare use of compensating payments, economists continue to document many possibilities for improving the welfare of all, if only those people who face a direct loss could be compensated. We hypothesize that compensation is only paid when losers of a policy changes are politically powerful and have strong reason to expect future profits from the existing policy to decline.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor:


Elizabeth Kwon Ruszak (2006)

Chloromethylprotease inhibitory effects of HPV infected keratinocytes

It has been recently discovered by Dr. Glawson's Laboratory that a chloromethylketone inhibitor of chymotrypsin-like protease activity, which we had previously described as a relatively selective inhibitor of the nuclear protease, has very potent inhibitory effects on keratinocytes infected with high-risk HPV in raft culture. It now has shown that an important target of the protease inhibitor is actually a family of ATP-dependent, DEAD-box helicases. This summer research will be focusing on documenting the covalent inactivation of a model helicase, the large T-antigen of SV40, defining the modification site, and developing an assay for measurement of helicase activity in nuclear extracts of HPV-infected cells.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor:


Eileen Shen (2014)

Investigation of Actin Nucleation Factors and Cytoskeletal Structure in Mouse Melanoma Cells

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: John Henson


Kirsten Marissa Simpson (2005)

Molecular biology and NMR to study retroviral genome recognition and packaging of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Dr. Mike Summers, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD

The lab that I have been offered a position at is the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). The lab is the Howard Hughes Medical Institue of UMBC and is run under Dr. Mike Summers. This lab works with the HIV virus and their efforts lie in the area of understanding the protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions that occur as retroviruses assemble in infected cells. They focus on the interactions to better understand the viral genome so that they can develop new drugs to help treat the virus. I will be conducting molecular biology and NMR to study retroviral genome recognition and packaging of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). The lab has recently been focusing on the Gag protein since all retroviruses encode a Gag precursor polyprotein that functions in the recognition of viral RNA and in the assembly of virus particules. They have encoded many proteins already and I will be helping to assemble more proteins in the virus. This is a huge opportunity for me to learn more about nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and computational methods that address protein-protein and protein-RNA interactions. This is also a great opportunity for me to help the biology community in general. There is also an opportunity to attend a conference in San Diego, CA at the end of August. The conference will be focused on proteins and protein-protein interactions.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor:


Brooke Leigh Slaton (1998)

NSF 9501428 Infrared Matrix Isolation Studies of Cyclic Hydrocarbons with Nitrogen and Oxygen Bases

Hydrocarbon-base matrix FTIR studies

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: Cindy Samet


Brooke Leigh Slaton (1998)

NSF 9501428 Infrared Matrix Isolation Studies of Cyclic Hydrocarbons with Nitrogen and Oxygen Bases

Hydrocarbon-base matrix FTIR studies

Term Funded:Spring 1996
Professor: Cindy Samet


Alicia Tang (2006)

The role of Pin1 in Regulation of p63, a p53 protein related to human tumorigenesis

The tumor suppressor protein p53 takes part in regulation of cell proliferation as well as apoptosis. P63 is in the family of p53, and it is vital for stem cell regeneration and embryonic development as well as coding for many various proteins. P63 is correlated with cancer development and with any extra production of certain specific p63 isoforms will be associated with human tumorigenesis. The purpose of this project is to find the role of Pin 1 in regulation of p63.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor:


Eleonore P Werner (2006)

Clone, express, purify and determine function of CaFpg protein. Susan S. Wallace, University of Vermont.

Damage to DNA molecules can be caused by free radicals. The damage caused by free radicals can be substantial in some cases and can lead to cancer. However, DNA has a mechanism called Base Excision Repair that can fix the damage that free radicals cause. Base Excision Repair is a very complex process involving many different proteins. The CaFpg protein (part of the Fpg/Nei family) is one of the many proteins working in the Base Excision Repair mechanism in eukaryotes outside of plants and vertebrates. The CaFpg protein is found Candida albicans, which is a known pathogen. The goal of my project will be to clone, express, purify and determine the function of the CaFpg protein. Upon completion of the project we will have better insight into how the pathegen functions, a better understanding of the substrate specificity of the CaFpg protein and information about the evolution of the Base Excision Repair mechanism since C. albicans is small not very complex organism.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor:


Max Evan Widawski (2014)

In Vivo Evolution of a Viral RNA

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: David Kushner


Biodiesel Project

Sarah Elizabeth Gold (2010)

From Waste to Co-Product: Finding Value in Crude Biodiesel Glycerol

The Dickinson College Biodiesel Project proposes to research and develop economically viable outlets for the crude glycerol byproduct that results from the production of biodiesel fuel from vegetable oils. To complete this study, Dickinson College will partner with Keystone Biofuels Inc., a new company based in the Harrisburg Keystone Innovation Zone. Crude biodiesel glycerol (CBG) is a "waste" that is produced in significant quantities by every biodiesel refinery, yet the market price for this material is very low due to an international glut. In the volatile, highly competitive biodiesel industry, the race is on to develop innovative, marketable outlets for this material in order to improve the profitability of renewable fuels production. The Dickinson College Biodiesel Project will research two specific outlets in this proof of concept study: use of CBG as a feedstock for anaerobic biogas digesters for waste-to-energy conversion and production of industrial liquid soap from CBG.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Matt Steiman


Andrew Woodward Kamerosky (2010)

From Waste to Co-Product: Finding Value in Crude Biodiesel Glycerol

The Dickinson College Biodiesel Project proposes to research and develop economically viable outlets for the crude glycerol byproduct that results from the production of biodiesel fuel from vegetable oils. To complete this study, Dickinson College will partner with Keystone Biofuels Inc., a new company based in the Harrisburg Keystone Innovation Zone. Crude biodiesel glycerol (CBG) is a "waste" that is produced in significant quantities by every biodiesel refinery, yet the market price for this material is very low due to an international glut. In the volatile, highly competitive biodiesel industry, the race is on to develop innovative, marketable outlets for this material in order to improve the profitability of renewable fuels production. The Dickinson College Biodiesel Project will research two specific outlets in this proof of concept study: use of CBG as a feedstock for anaerobic biogas digesters for waste-to-energy conversion and production of industrial liquid soap from CBG.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Matt Steiman


Kelly Elizabeth Maurer (2010)

From Waste to Co-Product: Finding Value in Crude Biodiesel Glycerol

The Dickinson College Biodiesel Project proposes to research and develop economically viable outlets for the crude glycerol byproduct that results from the production of biodiesel fuel from vegetable oils. To complete this study, Dickinson College will partner with Keystone Biofuels Inc., a new company based in the Harrisburg Keystone Innovation Zone. Crude biodiesel glycerol (CBG) is a "waste" that is produced in significant quantities by every biodiesel refinery, yet the market price for this material is very low due to an international glut. In the volatile, highly competitive biodiesel industry, the race is on to develop innovative, marketable outlets for this material in order to improve the profitability of renewable fuels production. The Dickinson College Biodiesel Project will research two specific outlets in this proof of concept study: use of CBG as a feedstock for anaerobic biogas digesters for waste-to-energy conversion and production of industrial liquid soap from CBG.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Matt Steiman


Biology

Jason Alan Ader (2007)

Characterizing specific properties of the newly identified SARS coronavirus proteins 7a and 7b

According to the World Health Organization, the outbreak of Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, SARS, in 2003 resulted in 8,098 infections and 774 fatalities in the human population. It is now known that SARS is caused by the infection of a coronavirus, a specific kind of RNA virus. This summer, I plan on researching this coronavirus while interning with Dr. Pekosz at Washington University School of Medicine. Specifically, I will be using techniques such as PCR mutagenesis and in vitro translation to study two newly characterized SARS coronavirus proteins, 7a and 7b. I will be responsible for determining the mechanism of translation of the open reading frame (orf) 7a and orf 7b, as well as determining the ability of 7b to interact or insert into membranes. This internship will not only deepen my understanding of the scientific method, but it should also produce valuable information regarding the deadly SARS coronavirus.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor:


Jason Alan Ader (2007)

Determination of the role of ergosterol in viral RNA replication complex

Viruses are gene poor; the host that the virus infects therefore contributes many functions towards the process of viral replication - the copying of the viral genetic material. Positive-strand RNA [(+)ssRNA] viruses include significant human pathogens such as hepatitis C virus, West Nile virus, and the coronavirus that causes SARS. These viruses can be difficult to study in the laboratory setting. My lab studies brome mosaic virus, a (+)ssRNA virus that naturally infects plants. The lab uses Baker's yeast as an alternate host for BMV because yeast is easy

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: David Kushner


Bria Symone Antoine (2016)

NSF 085670 STEP Program at Dickinson College

Through this program, Dickinson intends to recruit and matriculate a "science posse" cohort in each of three years beginning in the fall of 2009. The science posse program will have three major components: 1) a four-week summer pre-matriculation program in which students will participate in lab research and a series of enrichment workshops in chemistry and mathematics; 2) a second eight-week summer of research with Dickinson faculty members using our successful model of student/faculty research; and 3) a capstone eight-week summer research experience at off-campus laboratories in major research universities. The program will provide a strong mentoring experience for underrepresented students to support their pursuit of a science major. The successful implementation of this plan will result in the establishment of a cohort of science major role models for future students among our underrepresented minority groups. Results of the program will be disseminated widely within the broader scientific education community so that they may serve as a model for other institutions.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


A Atandi Anyona (2010)

Amphibian Populations and the Environment

Amphibian Populations and the Environment

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Gene Wingert


A Atandi Anyona (2010)

Evolutionary Developmental Biology of Snake Head Shape

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Scott Boback


Nathaniel LeMaster Armistead (2013)

Identification of Sexually Dimorphic Cells in the Mouse RTN

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Mary Niblock


Nathaniel LeMaster Armistead (2013)

Characterization of Myosin-XIX (MYO19), a Novel Actin-Based Motor

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Tiffany Frey


Nathaniel LeMaster Armistead (2013)

Identification of Sexually Dimorphic Cells in the Mouse Retrotrapezoid Nucleus

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: Mary Niblock


Tonia Renee Ashline (1995)

Neurochemical regulation of development and behavior in marine invertebrate larvae

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1994
Professor: Tony Pires


Gregory Walter Barnes (1991)

Genetic Substructure in Natural Populations of Woodchucks

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1988
Professor: Janet Wright


Robyn Lyn Barrett (2001)

Investigating a "Smoking Gun" to Allegheny Woodrat Populations

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Janet Wright


Alessandro Giovanni Bartoletti (1997)

The Role of high reperfusion oxygen tensions in kidney dysfunction

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Sara Elizabeth Baszczewski (2006)

Integrated Protein Informatics for Cancer Research

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor:


Paul Richard Battaglia (1999)

Spectrophotometric Analysis of the Enzymatic Activation of Alpha-Terthienyl by the Peroxidase- Catalyzed Oxidation of Indoleacetic Acid

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Thomas Brennan


Jeannette Marie Bauko (2001)

Molecular Cloning of AP-1 Target Genes Mediating Human Leukemia Cell Differentiation

We have established a human leukemia cell model system for studying cellular specialization (differentiation) and cancer cell growth regulation. These two apparently different phenomena actually share underlying mechanisms. The rapidly dividing, non-specialized leukemia cells can be induced in culture to differentiate into macrophage cells. Accompanying this differentiation is cell division arrest. Thus, the system can be analyzed in two ways; (1) elucidation of the molecular events leading to macrophage specialization, and (2) elucidation of the molecular events which "re-transform" rapidly dividing cancer cells into a non-dividing, normal cell type. An early event in the process is the activation of the transcription factor AP-1 which regulates the expression of other genes. We hypothesis that AP-1 "turns on" genes which lead to macrophage differentiation and cell division arrest. The goal of the purposed research is to isolate and identify those AP-1 target genes which mediate these effects. These experiments have only recently become possible due to the development of a new technique, "chromatin immunoselection."

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Michael Roberts


Matthew Ryan Beamer (2011)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Michael Edward Benson (2012)

NSF 0744261 RUI: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. The project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors n the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Justin James Bichler (2003)

Population dynamics and Growth requirements of Euprhorbia purpurea, the glade spurge

Euphoria purpurea or glade spurge is a rare swamp wildflower still known to exist at only about 30 sites, from North Carolina to Pennsylvania. Over the last seven years we have monitored populations at three of the six PA sites: at Lambs Gap In Perry Co., at Mt. Holly Marsh Preserve, and at Hunters Run (map on next page). Whitaker students and I conducted surveys of two additional PA sites (Goat Hill and Cowans Gap) in 1999 and 2000, in conjunction with State Parks and Bureau of Forestry personnel and with Nature Conservancy botanists. Because both populations appear to have declined alarmingly, we worked with these groups to erect fences to exclude deer at both sites and have obtained permission to intensify our population monitoring and our attempts to rear seedlings from these two sites. This summer I hope to 1) continue long-term monitoring at all five sites, 2) conduct a thorough search to locate additional plants that we think exist at Goat Hill, 3) obtain and analyze soil samples from all five sites to help us better understand the species' requirements, and 4) experiment to determine the best conditions for rearing seedlings, not only of this species but of two rare goldenrod species. We have begun using our long-term data set to document effects of deer on the plants, and I would like to expand the data analysis this year to assess the effects of early senescence in some plants on their growth and reproduction in the following season.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Carol Loeffler


Lily Margaret Bieber-Ham (2011)

Environmental Influences on Painted Turtles

Environmental Influences on Painted Turtles

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Scott Boback


Eric Anthony Biondi (2004)

Engineering yDBR mutants that bind but do not cut mRNA introns

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor:


Julianne Elizabeth Bishop (2009)

NSF 0744261 RUI: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. The project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors n the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:Spring 2009
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Lauren Elizabeth Bishop (1999)

NIH- 1R15GM47693-01 Cytoskeletal Dynamics during Dell Shape Changes

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: John Henson


Lauren Elizabeth Bishop (1999)

NIH- 1R15GM47693-01 Cytoskeletal Dynamics during Dell Shape Changes

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: John Henson


Susan Anne Blasi (2010)

NSF 0744261 RUI: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. The project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors n the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:Fall 2009
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Elena Michelle Brandano (2011)

NSF 0744261 RUI: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. The project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors n the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Elizabeth Anne Brandt (2013)

Population Ecology and Nest Site Selection in the Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta)

In contrast to most vertebrates which possess sex chromosomes, the gender of many reptile species is determined by the temperature experienced during the middle third of embryonic development. Painted turtles exhibit this strategy known as temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD); warm temperatures produce females, cool temps produce males, and intermediate temps produce both sexes. As average global temperatures increase over the next decade, an increasing number of female Painted turtles may be produced unless females adjust nest parameters to reduce their internal temperatures. In this study, we investigate the patterns of nest-site selection in a local population of Painted turtles in an attempt to discover the influence of local (roads, railroad tracks, buildings) and global (climate change) anthropogenic factors on the plasticity of this behavior. By recording and analyzing these variables, we will begin to understand how organisms respond to changes in temperature and therefore the biological consequences of global climate change.

Term Funded:summer 2012
Professor: Scott Boback


Jillian Loyer Brechbiel (2002)

Characterization of AP-1 Target Genes

The human leukemia cell line HL-60 can be induced to differentiate into macrophage-like cells. In the process, these rapidly dividing cancer cells eventually stop dividing. One of the early genetic events during differentiation is the induction of the transcription factor AP-1. Our hypothesis is that the induced AP-1 directs the activation of certain target genes which cause the cells to become macrophages and undergo cell division arrest. We have used a chromatin immunoprecipitation technique to isolate putative AP-1 target genes. The goal of this project is to fully characterize these candidate cell division control and macrophage-specific genes.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Michael Roberts


Jillian Loyer Brechbiel (2002)

Characterization of AP-1 Target Genes

The human leukemia cell line HL-60 can be induced to differentiate into macrophage-like cells. In the process, these rapidly dividing cancer cells eventually stop dividing. One of the early genetic events during differentiation is the induction of the transcription factor AP-1. Our hypothesis is that the induced AP-1 directs the activation of certain target genes which cause the cells to become macrophages and undergo cell division arrest. We have used a chromatin immunoprecipitation technique to isolate putative AP-1 target genes. The goal of this project is to fully characterize these candidate cell division control and macrophage-specific genes.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Michael Roberts


Karrie Anne Brondell (2008)

NSF 0744261: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. The project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors n the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:fall 2007
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Briana Latrice Brown (2017)

NSF 085670 STEP Program at Dickinson College

Through this program, Dickinson intends to recruit and matriculate a "science posse" cohort in each of three years beginning in the fall of 2009. The science posse program will have three major components: 1) a four-week summer pre-matriculation program in which students will participate in lab research and a series of enrichment workshops in chemistry and mathematics; 2) a second eight-week summer of research with Dickinson faculty members using our successful model of student/faculty research; and 3) a capstone eight-week summer research experience at off-campus laboratories in major research universities. The program will provide a strong mentoring experience for underrepresented students to support their pursuit of a science major. The successful implementation of this plan will result in the establishment of a cohort of science major role models for future students among our underrepresented minority groups. Results of the program will be disseminated widely within the broader scientific education community so that they may serve as a model for other institutions.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: John Henson


Mary Winifred Buckley (2010)

Structural Organization of the Contractile Ring during Cell Division in Sea Urchin Embryos

Understanding how cell division works is crucial to our overall knowledge of the role of cell proliferation in health and disease. Cell division consists of two distinct stages: karyokinesis involving division of the chromosomes and cytokinesis involving the division of the cytoplasm. Cytokinesis results from the transient assembly of a contractile ring consisting of the filamentous protein actin and it's associated motor protein myosin II. Although genetic, proteomic, and biochemical analyses have defined the components necessary for contractile ring assembly and constriction, fundamental questions remain regarding the structural organization of the contractile ring. In this study we plan to use sophisticated light and electron microscopic methods to study the structure of actin and myosin in contractile rings isolated from sea urchin embryos. We also plan to examine roles for proteins that impact the formation of actin filaments and those that influence the interaction of actin and myosin. The results of these studies should shed light on the structure and regulation of the contractile ring.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: John Henson


Jamie Ray Bugel (2013)

Molecular Analysis of Human Leukemia

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Michael Roberts


Melissa Amber Burgess (2005)

Sex differences in the brain and their influences on endocrine function.

During my ten-week internship at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, PA, I will research the importance of sex differences in the brain and how they influence the endocrine system. Eventually, insight about an organism's acceptance of neural and other engineered tissues can be developed through studying relevant sex differences in the brain and endocrine systems. This research will be of considerable importance to tissue engineering. This "regenerative medicine" is a rapidly growing field which will lead to improved patient care at less expense. My project will be investigating the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis which is an important endocrine modulator of the body's response to stress. By extracting hypothalami, pituitaries, and adrenal glands from Sprague-Dawley rats and setting up an experiment using the HPA Axis Model (Fig. 1), I will be able to study hormone concentrations while using radioimmunoassays along with immunoradiometric assay. After completing my project, I will prepare a formal poster for presentation at the Pittsburgh Tissue Engineering Initiative's Summer Symposium, as well as, submitting a one-page written summary to The Endocrine Society.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor:


Melissa Amber Burgess (2005)

Aging and stress hormones. Michael E. Rhodes, Ph.D., Center for Neurosciences Research, Allegheny General Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA

During my ten-week internship at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, PA, I will continue to research the exploration of cholinergic subsystems in the brain by using drugs that stimulate specific components of cholinergic neurotransmission and hormones within an in vitro model, to understand their importance in females vs. males and, especially, in old vs. young animals. Additionally, I will observe and document HPA responses to negative feedback mechanisms to further investigate differences in HPA responses to old and young, female and male, animals. After completing my fellowship, I will be attending a poster conference at the University of California San Diego from August 6-8, 2004. Additionally, I am hoping to prepare a manuscript, summarizing my in vitro results, for submission to a peer-reviewed journal, as well as, to present my poster at the Society for Neuroscience conference held from October 23-27, 2004 in San Diego, California.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor:


Carrie Jacobs Cafaro (2003)

Investigation of the Role of Photosensitization in Ultraviolet-B Induced Damage to the Photosynthetic Aparatus

Previous work in our laboratory has shown that ultraviolet-A radiation in combination with photosensitizers is capable of inhibiting photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation in higher plants. Similarly, ultraviolet-B radiation in the absence of photosensitizers also leads to diminished rates of photosynthesis. However, the possible participation of photosensitizers in ultraviolet-B effects has not been investigated. Using chlorophyll fluorescence analysis techniques, we propose to test the hypothesis that certain metal ions, such as Cu(11), may be capable of mediating ultraviolet-B induced damage to the photosynthetic apparatus. This work will provide further insights into the potential effects that terrestrial organisms are likely to experience as a result of increased ultraviolet-B exposure resulting from atmospheric ozone thinning.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Tom Brennan


Carrie Jacobs Cafaro (2003)

Investigation of the Role of Photosensitization in Ultraviolet-B Induced Damage to the Photosynthetic Aparatus

Previous work in our laboratory has shown that ultraviolet-A radiation in combination with photosensitizers is capable of inhibiting photosynthetic carbon dioxide fixation in higher plants. Similarly, ultraviolet-B radiation in the absence of photosensitizers also leads to diminished rates of photosynthesis. However, the possible participation of photosensitizers in ultraviolet-B effects has not been investigated. Using chlorophyll fluorescence analysis techniques, we propose to test the hypothesis that certain metal ions, such as Cu(11), may be capable of mediating ultraviolet-B induced damage to the photosynthetic apparatus. This work will provide further insights into the potential effects that terrestrial organisms are likely to experience as a result of increased ultraviolet-B exposure resulting from atmospheric ozone thinning.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Tom Brennan


Scott Alan Campbell (2002)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 2002
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Scott Alan Campbell (2002)

Investigating spatial aspects of Allegheny Woodrat (Neotoma magister) Populations

I propose to work with a student collaborator to extend or complete several projects begun over the last four years to investigate the population biology and decline of the endangered Allegheny woodrat, Neotoma magister. Specifically, we will determine the status of the closest population to Dickinson; we will analyze habitat patches for a population model; we will re-check the status of a health threat to one population. Our results will flesh out a model of woodrat population dynamics that will help identify at what point population decline spells extinction.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Janet Wright


Tracy Erin Campbell (2013)

Restoring P53 Function in Human Leukemia Cells

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Michael Roberts


Tracy Erin Campbell (2013)

Molecular Analysis of Human Leukemia

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: Michael Roberts


John George Capano (2013)

Biomechanics of Ventilation in Boa Constrictor

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Scott Boback


John George Capano (2013)

Physiological Performance of Snakes During Constriction

n/a

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: Scott Boback


Jennifer M Carr (2006)

Scalloped expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

During the early development of an organism, undifferentiated cells arrange into morphogenetic fields, distinct regions of cells that eventually give rise to specific tissues and structures in the adult organism. A vital part of this process is the region-specific expression of selector genes, genes that direct the development of specific developmental pathways. Expression of these genes is also seen outside of the morphogenetic field whose development they control, though the mechanisms that control regional specificity are unknown. In addition, the products of the same gene in different fields often have different functions. During this two-year project, we will study the expression of the selector gene sd within the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, with a specific focus on the nature and mechanisms of regional specificity that are characteristic of the gene's expression.

Term Funded:Year 2005
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Jennifer M Carr (2006)

Scalloped expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

During the early development of an organism, undifferentiated cells arrange into morphogenetic fields, distinct regions of cells that eventually give rise to specific tissues and structures in the adult organism. A vital part of this process is the region-specific expression of selector genes, genes that direct the development of specific developmental pathways. Expression of these genes is also seen outside of the morphogenetic field whose development they control, though the mechanisms that control regional specificity are unknown. In addition, the products of the same gene in different fields often have different functions. During this two-year project, we will study the expression of the selector gene sd within the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, with a specific focus on the nature and mechanisms of regional specificity that are characteristic of the gene's expression.

Term Funded:Year 2004
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Jennifer M Carr (2006)

Scalloped expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

During the early development of an organism, undifferentiated cells arrange into morphogenetic fields, distinct regions of cells that eventually give rise to specific tissues and structures in the adult organism. A vital part of this process is the region-specific expression of selector genes, genes that direct the development of specific developmental pathways. Expression of these genes is also seen outside of the morphogenetic field whose development they control, though the mechanisms that control regional specificity are unknown. In addition, the products of the same gene in different fields often have different functions. During this two-year project, we will study the expression of the selector gene sd within the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, with a specific focus on the nature and mechanisms of regional specificity that are characteristic of the gene's expression.

Term Funded:Year 2005
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Jennifer M Carr (2006)

Scalloped expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

During the early development of an organism, undifferentiated cells arrange into morphogenetic fields, distinct regions of cells that eventually give rise to specific tissues and structures in the adult organism. A vital part of this process is the region-specific expression of selector genes, genes that direct the development of specific developmental pathways. Expression of these genes is also seen outside of the morphogenetic field whose development they control, though the mechanisms that control regional specificity are unknown. In addition, the products of the same gene in different fields often have different functions. During this two-year project, we will study the expression of the selector gene sd within the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, with a specific focus on the nature and mechanisms of regional specificity that are characteristic of the gene's expression.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Jennifer M Carr (2006)

Scalloped expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

During the early development of an organism, undifferentiated cells arrange into morphogenetic fields, distinct regions of cells that eventually give rise to specific tissues and structures in the adult organism. A vital part of this process is the region-specific expression of selector genes, genes that direct the development of specific developmental pathways. Expression of these genes is also seen outside of the morphogenetic field whose development they control, though the mechanisms that control regional specificity are unknown. In addition, the products of the same gene in different fields often have different functions. During this two-year project, we will study the expression of the selector gene sd within the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, with a specific focus on the nature and mechanisms of regional specificity that are characteristic of the gene's expression.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Jennifer M Carr (2006)

Scalloped Expression During Drosophila Embryogenesis

I am serving as the faculty mentor for Jennifer Havens '06, a Beckman Scholar. The Beckman Scholar Program supports student research with a faculty member for an academic year bracketed by two summers. Summer 2005 will be Jen's second summer in my laboratory. Because faculty stipends are not covered by the Beckman program, I respectfully request a stipend for our 10 weeks of work. Jen's proposal was approved and funded in April 2004. I have attached a copy of her proposal and my summary of her summer 2004 work.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Jennifer M Carr (2006)

Scalloped expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

During the early development of an organism, undifferentiated cells arrange into morphogenetic fields, distinct regions of cells that eventually give rise to specific tissues and structures in the adult organism. A vital part of this process is the region-specific expression of selector genes, genes that direct the development of specific developmental pathways. Expression of these genes is also seen outside of the morphogenetic field whose development they control, though the mechanisms that control regional specificity are unknown. In addition, the products of the same gene in different fields often have different functions. During this two-year project, we will study the expression of the selector gene sd within the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, with a specific focus on the nature and mechanisms of regional specificity that are characteristic of the gene's expression.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Jennifer M Carr (2006)

Scalloped expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

During the early development of an organism, undifferentiated cells arrange into morphogenetic fields, distinct regions of cells that eventually give rise to specific tissues and structures in the adult organism. A vital part of this process is the region-specific expression of selector genes, genes that direct the development of specific developmental pathways. Expression of these genes is also seen outside of the morphogenetic field whose development they control, though the mechanisms that control regional specificity are unknown. In addition, the products of the same gene in different fields often have different functions. During this two-year project, we will study the expression of the selector gene sd within the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, with a specific focus on the nature and mechanisms of regional specificity that are characteristic of the gene's expression.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Adam Daniel Cesanek (2010)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

Under a previous award the PIs discovered that young, heterotrophic poplar leaves must import carbon resources to be able to respond to insects or jasmonate elicitation with increased phenolic defense synthesis. Increased import, or "Induced Sink Strength" (ISS), determines leaf responsiveness, and helps explain why some leaves are more "inducible" than others and why plant defenses are spatially and temporally heterogenous. This project would examine the generality of ISS by studying two additional plant species whose inducible defenses differ from those in poplar: alkaloids in tomato and glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Young (sink) leaves will be elicted by wounding + oral secretions from insects that stimulate defenses; changes in defense production, carbon and nitrogen import (using stable isotopes), and cell wall invertase then will be assessed. Transport will be blocked with non-damaging steam girdling in some plants to demonstrate the requirement for importation in induced defenses. In addition to alkaloids and glucosinolates in tomato and Arabidopsis, the dependence on ISS of induction of protein defenses (chitinases, polyphenoloxidases, peroxidases, proteinase inhibitors) will be examined in these species and poplar. Previous results suggested that competing sinks may alter leaf responses to elicitation by hampering material or signal transport. A series of experiments is proposed with combinations of the 3 study plants in which the number, size, proximity of and damage to potentially competing sinks (lateral branches, nearby leaves, fruits) is manipulated and the impact on the responsiveness of young target leaves is assessed. The ability of one herbivore to block or enhance responses to a second by feeding nearby on competing or cooperating sinks will be examined. These studies include both correlative m

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Tom Arnold


Adam Daniel Cesanek (2010)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

Under a previous award the PIs discovered that young, heterotrophic poplar leaves must import carbon resources to be able to respond to insects or jasmonate elicitation with increased phenolic defense synthesis. Increased import, or "Induced Sink Strength" (ISS), determines leaf responsiveness, and helps explain why some leaves are more "inducible" than others and why plant defenses are spatially and temporally heterogenous. This project would examine the generality of ISS by studying two additional plant species whose inducible defenses differ from those in poplar: alkaloids in tomato and glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Young (sink) leaves will be elicted by wounding + oral secretions from insects that stimulate defenses; changes in defense production, carbon and nitrogen import (using stable isotopes), and cell wall invertase then will be assessed. Transport will be blocked with non-damaging steam girdling in some plants to demonstrate the requirement for importation in induced defenses. In addition to alkaloids and glucosinolates in tomato and Arabidopsis, the dependence on ISS of induction of protein defenses (chitinases, polyphenoloxidases, peroxidases, proteinase inhibitors) will be examined in these species and poplar. Previous results suggested that competing sinks may alter leaf responses to elicitation by hampering material or signal transport. A series of experiments is proposed with combinations of the 3 study plants in which the number, size, proximity of and damage to potentially competing sinks (lateral branches, nearby leaves, fruits) is manipulated and the impact on the responsiveness of young target leaves is assessed. The ability of one herbivore to block or enhance responses to a second by feeding nearby on competing or cooperating sinks will be examined. These studies include both correlative m

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: Tom Arnold


Adam Daniel Cesanek (2010)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

Under a previous award the PIs discovered that young, heterotrophic poplar leaves must import carbon resources to be able to respond to insects or jasmonate elicitation with increased phenolic defense synthesis. Increased import, or "Induced Sink Strength" (ISS), determines leaf responsiveness, and helps explain why some leaves are more "inducible" than others and why plant defenses are spatially and temporally heterogenous. This project would examine the generality of ISS by studying two additional plant species whose inducible defenses differ from those in poplar: alkaloids in tomato and glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Young (sink) leaves will be elicted by wounding + oral secretions from insects that stimulate defenses; changes in defense production, carbon and nitrogen import (using stable isotopes), and cell wall invertase then will be assessed. Transport will be blocked with non-damaging steam girdling in some plants to demonstrate the requirement for importation in induced defenses. In addition to alkaloids and glucosinolates in tomato and Arabidopsis, the dependence on ISS of induction of protein defenses (chitinases, polyphenoloxidases, peroxidases, proteinase inhibitors) will be examined in these species and poplar. Previous results suggested that competing sinks may alter leaf responses to elicitation by hampering material or signal transport. A series of experiments is proposed with combinations of the 3 study plants in which the number, size, proximity of and damage to potentially competing sinks (lateral branches, nearby leaves, fruits) is manipulated and the impact on the responsiveness of young target leaves is assessed. The ability of one herbivore to block or enhance responses to a second by feeding nearby on competing or cooperating sinks will be examined. These studies include both correlative m

Term Funded:Fall 2007
Professor: Tom Arnold


Stuart Changoor (2013)

Molecular Analysis of Human Leukemia

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: Michael Roberts


David Cheung (2006)

NIH 1R15GM60925-02 Mechanism and Regulation of Actin-based Retrograde Flow

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: John Henson


Emily T Cocores (2006)

NSF 0110832 RUI: Neural Regulation of Metamorphosis in a Gastropod Mollusc

Development of many types of animals is marked by a dramatic structural transformation, or metamorphosis, between larval and adult forms. Although metamorphosis is gradual and driven by hormones in well-studied developmental systems such as frogs and fruit flies, in other animals it is sudden, rapid, and driven by the larval nervous system. This is especially true in the marine environment, where metamorphosis is triggered by a chemical signal associated with food or habitat required by the adult form. The role of the nervous system in the control of such metamorphoses is poorly understood and has been the focus of Prof. Pires' research for the last decade. Working with larvae of gastropod molluscs (snails), he has shown that one family of chemical signals within the nervous system, the catecholamines, are important regulators of metamorphosis. It is now important to determine if this is a general feature of gastropod metamorphosis or is peculiar to certain species. Differences between species can be considered "experiments of nature" to clarify neurochemical control mechanisms in metamorphosis. Pilot experiments last summer revealed surprising diversity among species, in responses to pharmacological manipulation of endogenous catecholamines. This summer Prof. Pires hopes to see if this diversity can be related to quantitative differences in catecholamine content, or qualitative differences in the distribution of catecholamine-containing cells in larval nervous systems. This project will bring a student into the dynamic research environment of the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories, a world-class center for research in neural and developmental marine biology.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Tony Pires


Erin McShane Coleman-Cordes (2002)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 2001
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Brian Joseph Corbett (1998)

Radiotelemetry study of experimental recolonization of an Allegheny woodrat population

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: Janet Wright


Jason Scott Cordes (2002)

Investigating spatial aspects of Allegheny Woodrat (Neotoma magister) Populations

I propose to work with a student collaborator to extend or complete several projects begun over the last four years to investigate the population biology and decline of the endangered Allegheny woodrat, Neotoma magister. Specifically, we will determine the status of the closest population to Dickinson; we will analyze habitat patches for a population model; we will re-check the status of a health threat to one population. Our results will flesh out a model of woodrat population dynamics that will help identify at what point population decline spells extinction.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Janet Wright


Jason Scott Cordes (2002)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Michael Roberts


Russell Harmon Dabbs (2001)

Research on the population ecology of Euphorbia purpurea, or glade spurge

The project has three components, all involving the ecology of rare plant species. The first is our primary focus but I think the other two will provide good learning experiences as well. A.) Research on the population ecology of Euphoribia purpurea, or glade spurge, a globally rare swamp wildflower related to the poinsettia. There are only ca. 30 populations of glade spurge in existence, including six populations in PA; and it is considered threatened or endangered in each of the eight states in which it occurs. In Pennsylvania, students and I have monitored its status regularly at three sites since 1994 and have made occasional trips to the other PA sites with the DCNR and The Nature Conservancy. B.) Proprogation of two other wildflower species for future research and coursework. We will erect a deer exclosure plot at the Reineman Sanctuary and plant there several dozen individuals of Aster radula (rough-leaved aster) and Solidago speciosa (showy goldenrod) plants that are currently in flowerpots. The student and I will work together and will have assistance from Rob Martens of our department and from the sanctuary manager, Lee Schull. These two species are also endangered in PA. C.) Pollination of chestnut trees at the Reineman Wildlife Sanctuary, in collaboration with the American Chestnut Foundation. This involves bagging female flowers to prevent contamination by the wrong type of pollen, and then spreading male pollen from the desired parent tree onto the female flowers within the bags. It is part of a project to breed resistance from a devastating fungal disease, chestnut blight, into the American chestnut and thereby save that tree species from extinction.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Carol Loeffler


Shannon Lilly Dauses (2005)

Scalloped expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

During the early development of an organism, undifferentiated cells arrange into morphogenetic fields, distinct regions of cells that eventually give rise to specific tissues and structures in the adult organism. A vital part of this process is the region-specific expression of selector genes, genes that direct the development of specific developmental pathways. Expression of these genes is also seen outside of the morphogenetic field whose development they control, though the mechanisms that control regional specificity are unknown. In addition, the products of the same gene in different fields often have different functions. During this two-year project, we will study the expression of the selector gene sd within the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, with a specific focus on the nature and mechanisms of regional specificity that are characteristic of the gene's expression.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Shannon Lilly Dauses (2005)

Scalloped expression during Drosophila embryogenesis

During the early development of an organism, undifferentiated cells arrange into morphogenetic fields, distinct regions of cells that eventually give rise to specific tissues and structures in the adult organism. A vital part of this process is the region-specific expression of selector genes, genes that direct the development of specific developmental pathways. Expression of these genes is also seen outside of the morphogenetic field whose development they control, though the mechanisms that control regional specificity are unknown. In addition, the products of the same gene in different fields often have different functions. During this two-year project, we will study the expression of the selector gene sd within the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, with a specific focus on the nature and mechanisms of regional specificity that are characteristic of the gene's expression.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Shannon Lilly Dauses (2005)

Characterization of catalysis-deficient mutants of mouse debranching enzyme.

During the past year Dr. Kirsten Guss has continued to collaborate with Dr. Javier Lopez on a project entitled "Characterization of catalysis-deficient mutants of mouse debranching enzyme." Debranching enzyme targets the 2'-5' phosphodiester bond at the branch junction in the splicing lariat intermediate. The collaborative project involves the molecular cloning of three alleles of the gene that encodes the debranching enzyme (wild type and two mutant versions) to generate constructs for in vitro expression of the proteins.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor:


Shannon Lilly Dauses (2005)

Characterization of catalysis-deficient mutants of mouse debranching enzyme.

During the past year Dr. Kirsten Guss has continued to collaborate with Dr. Javier Lopez on a project entitled "Characterization of catalysis-deficient mutants of mouse debranching enzyme." Debranching enzyme targets the 2'-5' phosphodiester bond at the branch junction in the splicing lariat intermediate. The collaborative project involves the molecular cloning of three alleles of the gene that encodes the debranching enzyme (wild type and two mutant versions) to generate constructs for in vitro expression of the proteins.

Term Funded:Fall 2004
Professor:


Nicole Allegra Davidson (2013)

Ecological Consequences of Nest Site Selection in the Painted Turtle

Ecological Consequences of Nest Site Selection in the Painted Turtle

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: Scott Boback


Nicole Allegra Davidson (2013)

Ecological and Environmental Influences on Nest-Site Selection of the Painted Turtle

In Painted turtles, the temperature of the nest determines the gender of the hatchlings: warm temps result in female hatchlings while cooler temps result in male hatchlings. As a result, painted turtles are susceptible to climate change. We aim to understand how increases in average daily temperature may affect how females choose suitable sites to lay their eggs and whether these nests are successful in producing hatchlings. In this study, we investigate the patterns of nest-site selection in a local population of Painted turtles in an attempt to discover the interaction between local (roads, railroad tracks, buildings) and global (climate change) anthropogenic factors in determining the behavior of turtles and the survival of their offspring. By recording and analyzing basic parameters such as temperature, location, and exposure we will begin to understand how organisms respond to changes in temperature and therefore the biological consequences of global climate change.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Scott Boback


Nicole Allegra Davidson (2013)

Ecological and environmental consequences of nest site selection in the Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta)

In contrast to most vertebrates which possess sex chromosomes, the gender of many reptile species is determined by the temperature experienced during the middle third of embryonic development. Consequently, the sex ratio, a critical demographic parameter, is strongly influenced by changes in environmental temperature. As such, climate change can and will have major impacts on the survival of species which exhibit this strategy known as temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). In this study we will monitor environmental and ecological parameters which determine hatchling survival in the eastern Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta). Nest temperatures will be obtained using miniature data loggers and a suite of environmental parameters will be recorded for each nest. By recording and analyzing these variables, we will begin to understand how females choose nest sites and how the environment, both current and future, can impact these populations. Therefore, our research will contribute to our understanding of the biological consequences of global climate change.

Term Funded:
Professor: Scott Boback


Nicole Allegra Davidson (2013)

Ecological and environmental consequences of nest site selection in the Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta)

In contrast to most vertebrates which possess sex chromosomes, the gender of many reptile species is determined by the temperature experienced during the middle third of embryonic development. Consequently, the sex ratio, a critical demographic parameter, is strongly influenced by changes in environmental temperature. As such, climate change can and will have major impacts on the survival of species which exhibit this strategy known as temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). In this study we will monitor environmental and ecological parameters which determine hatchling survival in the eastern Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta). Nest temperatures will be obtained using miniature data loggers and a suite of environmental parameters will be recorded for each nest. By recording and analyzing these variables, we will begin to understand how females choose nest sites and how the environment, both current and future, can impact these populations. Therefore, our research will contribute to our understanding of the biological consequences of global climate change.

Term Funded:
Professor: Scott Boback


Nicole Allegra Davidson (2013)

Utilizing American Toads for Agricultural Pest Management

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Scott Boback


Jessica E Davis (2004)

Investigating the role of contractile forces in the cell motility of se urching ceolomocytes.

Sea urchin blood cells (coelomocytes) are an excellent model experimental system for structure and function studies focused on the "cytoskeleton," the complex collection of structural and motor proteins that mediates fundamental cell processes such as motility, division and signaling. Our recent work suggests that contractile forces, mediated by the interaction of the structural protein actin and the motor protein myosin, play an integral role in both coelomocyte motility and the overall structuring of cell's cytoskeletal organization. In order to more fully test this hyopothesis we plan to use both morphological and biochemical methods to attempt to determine the extent of actomyosin contractile forces in these cells. The results of this study should contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cell motility.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: John Henson


Jessica E Davis (2004)

Bioinformatics of Subcellular Localization and Changes due to Cancer

The aspect of the project undertaken involved a test of the ability of computer-based pattern recognition software developed in the Murphy lab to distinguish drug-induced changes in fluorescently labeled protein patterns in tissue culture cells. The fluorescent labeling was accomplished using either a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based method or immunofluorescent staining. For GFP labeling, cells expressing a stable form of GFP labeling were provided by the Jarvik lab.

Term Funded:Spring 2004
Professor: John Henson


Jessica E Davis (2004)

Bioinformatics of Subcellular Localization and Changes due to Cancer

The aspect of the project undertaken involved a test of the ability of computer-based pattern recognition software developed in the Murphy lab to distinguish drug-induced changes in fluorescently labeled protein patterns in tissue culture cells. The fluorescent labeling was accomplished using either a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-based method or immunofluorescent staining. For GFP labeling, cells expressing a stable form of GFP labeling were provided by the Jarvik lab.

Term Funded:Fall 2003
Professor: John Henson


Jessica E Davis (2004)

Investigating the role of contractile forces in the cell motility of se urching ceolomocytes.

Sea urchin blood cells (coelomocytes) are an excellent model experimental system for structure and function studies focused on the "cytoskeleton," the complex collection of structural and motor proteins that mediates fundamental cell processes such as motility, division and signaling. Our recent work suggests that contractile forces, mediated by the interaction of the structural protein actin and the motor protein myosin, play an integral role in both coelomocyte motility and the overall structuring of cell's cytoskeletal organization. In order to more fully test this hyopothesis we plan to use both morphological and biochemical methods to attempt to determine the extent of actomyosin contractile forces in these cells. The results of this study should contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cell motility.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: John Henson


Rachel Elaine Davis (1998)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 1998
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Lisa Marie DeLiso (2002)

Population dynamics and Growth requirements of Euphorbia purpurea, the glade spurge

Euphoria purpurea or glade spurge is a rare swamp wildflower still known to exist at only about 30 sites, from North Carolina to Pennsylvania. Over the last seven years we have monitored populations at three of the six PA sites: at Lambs Gap In Perry Co., at Mt. Holly Marsh Preserve, and at Hunters Run (map on next page). Whitaker students and I conducted surveys of two additional PA sites (Goat Hill and Cowans Gap) in 1999 and 2000, in conjunction with State Parks and Bureau of Forestry personnel and with Nature Conservancy botanists. Because both populations appear to have declined alarmingly, we worked with these groups to erect fences to exclude deer at both sites and have obtained permission to intensify our population monitoring and our attempts to rear seedlings from these two sites. This summer I hope to 1) continue long-term monitoring at all five sites, 2) conduct a thorough search to locate additional plants that we think exist at Goat Hill, 3) obtain and analyze soil samples from all five sites to help us better understand the species' requirements, and 4) experiment to determine the best conditions for rearing seedlings, not only of this species but of two rare goldenrod species. We have begun using our long-term data set to document effects of deer on the plants, and I would like to expand the data analysis this year to assess the effects of early senescence in some plants on their growth and reproduction in the following season.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Carol Loeffler


Wesley George Dean (2014)

Sexual Dimorphism in the Mouse Retrotrapezoid Nucleus

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: Mary Niblock


Casey Lyn DelConte (2005)

Evaluation of potential targets of SCALLOPED function during Drosophila development

A fundamental aspect of the process of development is the production of different types of cells, despite underlying identical genetic potentials. This diversity of cell types results from the expression of only a subset of the genome present in a cell. How the members of this subset of genes are determined, and when and where in the developing organism they will be activated, is the basis of the investigation of the control of gene expression. Coordination of gene expression in the context of the developing organism is critical to result in a correctly formed, patterned, and sized individual. We address this question of coordination of gene expression in the developing fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The aim of this proposal is to evaluate several candidate target genes, identified by computer-based methods, of the wing selector gene scalloped.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Casey Lyn DelConte (2005)

Evaluation of potential targets of SCALLOPED function during Drosophila development

A fundamental aspect of the process of development is the production of different types of cells, despite underlying identical genetic potentials. This diversity of cell types results from the expression of only a subset of the genome present in a cell. How the members of this subset of genes are determined, and when and where in the developing organism they will be activated, is the basis of the investigation of the control of gene expression. Coordination of gene expression in the context of the developing organism is critical to result in a correctly formed, patterned, and sized individual. We address this question of coordination of gene expression in the developing fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. The aim of this proposal is to evaluate several candidate target genes, identified by computer-based methods, of the wing selector gene scalloped.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Alice Kaye Denea (2013)

SCALLOPED in the Drosophila Larva

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Jenna Marie Dente (2004)

NSF 0336716 RUI Collaborative Research: Mechanisms of induced pathogen resistance in seagrasses

Enzyme biomarkers for seagrass stress

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Tom Arnold


John Mestrovic Deyrup (2009)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

In YEAR 1 we have succeeded in completing all proposed greenhouse experiments involving hybrid poplar saplings and made progress in establishing Arabidopsis and tomato as model systems in which to examine induced sink strength (ISS), which we hypothesize is a conuuon, first step in general plant wound responses. POPLAR EXPERIMENTS. Along with my co-PIs (Jack Schultz and Heidi Appel) I worked to complete the proposed experiments aimed at testing the ability of wounded poplar foliage to draw in additional resources, via an induction of cell wall invertase activities, to support the production of anti-herbivore defenses. Three large, factorial experiments involving over 500 poplar samplings were completed in the summer of 2006. The ability of induced foliage to import carbohydrates and nitrogen, observed using 1 3C and 1 SN tracers, was assessed with and without disruption of phloem transport and the presence of competing sink tissues, e.g. other wounded branches which compete for resources. These experiments were the largest, most complicated we have attempted since we began this work over eight years ago. ARABIDOPSIS. We have made good progress in developing Arabidopsis as a model system for testing the hypothesis that 155 is a common first step in defense responses. This required some additional effort because it became clear that which this species does possess the ISS response, it reacts a bit differently than poplar. In a series of experiments involving undergraduate students, we tested for the presence or absence of the IS S response in this plant at various developmental stages, in a range of sink and source leaves. The large number of enzyme assays required the development of a new enzyme activity assay, using high through-put grinders, which has increased our ability to process samples by nearly 10-fold.

Term Funded:Spring 2007
Professor: Tom Arnold


Amy Michelle Diamond (2015)

Ventilatory Changes in Male and Female Mice in Response to Whole Animal Exposure to Carbon Dioxide

My lab recently discovered a sex difference in the activation of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) in mice in response to 5% crbon dioxide (CO2). There are more than three times as many RTN cells that respond to 5% C2 in males than in females. Our data are intriguing given that the RTN regulates breathing in response to changes in blood carbon dioxide and is defective in several conditions that disproportionately affect males, including the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The proposed study will address an important follow-up question: do females increase their breathing in response to 5% C2 even though the RTN isn't activated? We will collect ventilatory data and correlate numbers of CO2-activated RTN cells with changes in ventilation in mice of each sex. These data will further our understanding of the sex difference in the mouse RTN and also may explain why females are less susceptible to SIDS.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Missy Niblock


Eric Kyle Dichter (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Fall 2006
Professor: David Kushner


Eric Kyle Dichter (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Spring 2007
Professor: David Kushner


Eric Kyle Dichter (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Fall 2006
Professor: David Kushner


Alice Ann Duchon (2011)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Debra Ann Dudas Honer (1991)

Construction of Recombinant Strains of Aspergillus Nidulans

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1990
Professor: Craig Jurgensen


Jillian Hammond Dunbar (2014)

Mechanisms of CD14 Expression

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: Tiffany Frey


Javier Victor Duran (1998)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 1998
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Kristi A Elder (2001)

NIH-Roberts

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Michael Roberts


Jessica Elizabeth Ellerman (2003)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 2002
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Jonathan Curry Emlet (2003)

Specificity of selector gene activity during Drosophila development

Developmental biology strives to address how a single cell, the fertilized egg, develops into an organism composed of many cells of many types that are precisely patterned and organized. Tissues, organs, and structures within the organism may develop from discrete clusters of cells called fields. These primordia may be specified to form a given structure through the activity of a special kind of protein, a field-specific transcription factor. These proteins control directly the expression of other proteins necessary for the elaboration of the tissue or structure. The aim of this work is to understand the mechanism by which the initial specification of these fields occurs; that is, what specifies the activity of the field-specific transcription factor? The student researcher who participates in the project will play an instrumental role in investigating this area of study as a potential research trajectory for my laboratory.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Jonathan Curry Emlet (2003)

Specificity of selector gene activity during Drosophila development

Developmental biology strives to address how a single cell, the fertilized egg, develops into an organism composed of many cells of many types that are precisely patterned and organized. Tissues, organs, and structures within the organism may develop from discrete clusters of cells called fields. These primordia may be specified to form a given structure through the activity of a special kind of protein, a field-specific transcription factor. These proteins control directly the expression of other proteins necessary for the elaboration of the tissue or structure. The aim of this work is to understand the mechanism by which the initial specification of these fields occurs; that is, what specifies the activity of the field-specific transcription factor? The student researcher who participates in the project will play an instrumental role in investigating this area of study as a potential research trajectory for my laboratory.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Lisa Nicole Estrella (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: David Kushner


Francoise Annick Febrey (2003)

Molecular Endocrinology and Genetics

I will be actively participating in the lab studies at Bioqual, Inc. including quality research, development and consulting services to Government and commercial contract clients. The overall goal is to compare different organisms on the subspecies level. I will have the opportunity to work with and learn about primate genetics and development. We will compare levels of genetic variation among subspecies using short tandem repeats (STRs or "microsatellites") and functional genes. We will also study phenotypic differentiation among subspecies. I will be using techniques such as PCR and in-vitro cell assays. Assignment to a specific research project at Bioqual is pending funding request.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor:


Elise Marguerite Fiala (2013)

Scalloped Expression During Larval Development

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Kathryn Denise Fiedler (2007)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

Under a previous award the PIs discovered that young, heterotrophic poplar leaves must import carbon resources to be able to respond to insects or jasmonate elicitation with increased phenolic defense synthesis. Increased import, or "Induced Sink Strength" (ISS), determines leaf responsiveness, and helps explain why some leaves are more "inducible" than others and why plant defenses are spatially and temporally heterogenous. This project would examine the generality of ISS by studying two additional plant species whose inducible defenses differ from those in poplar: alkaloids in tomato and glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Young (sink) leaves will be elicted by wounding + oral secretions from insects that stimulate defenses; changes in defense production, carbon and nitrogen import (using stable isotopes), and cell wall invertase then will be assessed. Transport will be blocked with non-damaging steam girdling in some plants to demonstrate the requirement for importation in induced defenses. In addition to alkaloids and glucosinolates in tomato and Arabidopsis, the dependence on ISS of induction of protein defenses (chitinases, polyphenoloxidases, peroxidases, proteinase inhibitors) will be examined in these species and poplar. Previous results suggested that competing sinks may alter leaf responses to elicitation by hampering material or signal transport. A series of experiments is proposed with combinations of the 3 study plants in which the number, size, proximity of and damage to potentially competing sinks (lateral branches, nearby leaves, fruits) is manipulated and the impact on the responsiveness of young target leaves is assessed. The ability of one herbivore to block or enhance responses to a second by feeding nearby on competing or cooperating sinks will be examined. These studies include both correlative m

Term Funded:Fall 2007
Professor: Tom Arnold


Kathryn Denise Fiedler (2007)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

Under a previous award the PIs discovered that young, heterotrophic poplar leaves must import carbon resources to be able to respond to insects or jasmonate elicitation with increased phenolic defense synthesis. Increased import, or "Induced Sink Strength" (ISS), determines leaf responsiveness, and helps explain why some leaves are more "inducible" than others and why plant defenses are spatially and temporally heterogenous. This project would examine the generality of ISS by studying two additional plant species whose inducible defenses differ from those in poplar: alkaloids in tomato and glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Young (sink) leaves will be elicted by wounding + oral secretions from insects that stimulate defenses; changes in defense production, carbon and nitrogen import (using stable isotopes), and cell wall invertase then will be assessed. Transport will be blocked with non-damaging steam girdling in some plants to demonstrate the requirement for importation in induced defenses. In addition to alkaloids and glucosinolates in tomato and Arabidopsis, the dependence on ISS of induction of protein defenses (chitinases, polyphenoloxidases, peroxidases, proteinase inhibitors) will be examined in these species and poplar. Previous results suggested that competing sinks may alter leaf responses to elicitation by hampering material or signal transport. A series of experiments is proposed with combinations of the 3 study plants in which the number, size, proximity of and damage to potentially competing sinks (lateral branches, nearby leaves, fruits) is manipulated and the impact on the responsiveness of young target leaves is assessed. The ability of one herbivore to block or enhance responses to a second by feeding nearby on competing or cooperating sinks will be examined. These studies include both correlative m

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: Tom Arnold


Kathryn Denise Fiedler (2007)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

In YEAR 1 we have succeeded in completing all proposed greenhouse experiments involving hybrid poplar saplings and made progress in establishing Arabidopsis and tomato as model systems in which to examine induced sink strength (ISS), which we hypothesize is a conuuon, first step in general plant wound responses. POPLAR EXPERIMENTS. Along with my co-PIs (Jack Schultz and Heidi Appel) I worked to complete the proposed experiments aimed at testing the ability of wounded poplar foliage to draw in additional resources, via an induction of cell wall invertase activities, to support the production of anti-herbivore defenses. Three large, factorial experiments involving over 500 poplar samplings were completed in the summer of 2006. The ability of induced foliage to import carbohydrates and nitrogen, observed using 1 3C and 1 SN tracers, was assessed with and without disruption of phloem transport and the presence of competing sink tissues, e.g. other wounded branches which compete for resources. These experiments were the largest, most complicated we have attempted since we began this work over eight years ago. ARABIDOPSIS. We have made good progress in developing Arabidopsis as a model system for testing the hypothesis that 155 is a common first step in defense responses. This required some additional effort because it became clear that which this species does possess the ISS response, it reacts a bit differently than poplar. In a series of experiments involving undergraduate students, we tested for the presence or absence of the IS S response in this plant at various developmental stages, in a range of sink and source leaves. The large number of enzyme assays required the development of a new enzyme activity assay, using high through-put grinders, which has increased our ability to process samples by nearly 10-fold.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Tom Arnold


Kathryn Denise Fiedler (2007)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

In YEAR 1 we have succeeded in completing all proposed greenhouse experiments involving hybrid poplar saplings and made progress in establishing Arabidopsis and tomato as model systems in which to examine induced sink strength (ISS), which we hypothesize is a conuuon, first step in general plant wound responses. POPLAR EXPERIMENTS. Along with my co-PIs (Jack Schultz and Heidi Appel) I worked to complete the proposed experiments aimed at testing the ability of wounded poplar foliage to draw in additional resources, via an induction of cell wall invertase activities, to support the production of anti-herbivore defenses. Three large, factorial experiments involving over 500 poplar samplings were completed in the summer of 2006. The ability of induced foliage to import carbohydrates and nitrogen, observed using 1 3C and 1 SN tracers, was assessed with and without disruption of phloem transport and the presence of competing sink tissues, e.g. other wounded branches which compete for resources. These experiments were the largest, most complicated we have attempted since we began this work over eight years ago. ARABIDOPSIS. We have made good progress in developing Arabidopsis as a model system for testing the hypothesis that 155 is a common first step in defense responses. This required some additional effort because it became clear that which this species does possess the ISS response, it reacts a bit differently than poplar. In a series of experiments involving undergraduate students, we tested for the presence or absence of the IS S response in this plant at various developmental stages, in a range of sink and source leaves. The large number of enzyme assays required the development of a new enzyme activity assay, using high through-put grinders, which has increased our ability to process samples by nearly 10-fold.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Tom Arnold


Kathryn Denise Fiedler (2007)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

In YEAR 1 we have succeeded in completing all proposed greenhouse experiments involving hybrid poplar saplings and made progress in establishing Arabidopsis and tomato as model systems in which to examine induced sink strength (ISS), which we hypothesize is a conuuon, first step in general plant wound responses. POPLAR EXPERIMENTS. Along with my co-PIs (Jack Schultz and Heidi Appel) I worked to complete the proposed experiments aimed at testing the ability of wounded poplar foliage to draw in additional resources, via an induction of cell wall invertase activities, to support the production of anti-herbivore defenses. Three large, factorial experiments involving over 500 poplar samplings were completed in the summer of 2006. The ability of induced foliage to import carbohydrates and nitrogen, observed using 1 3C and 1 SN tracers, was assessed with and without disruption of phloem transport and the presence of competing sink tissues, e.g. other wounded branches which compete for resources. These experiments were the largest, most complicated we have attempted since we began this work over eight years ago. ARABIDOPSIS. We have made good progress in developing Arabidopsis as a model system for testing the hypothesis that 155 is a common first step in defense responses. This required some additional effort because it became clear that which this species does possess the ISS response, it reacts a bit differently than poplar. In a series of experiments involving undergraduate students, we tested for the presence or absence of the IS S response in this plant at various developmental stages, in a range of sink and source leaves. The large number of enzyme assays required the development of a new enzyme activity assay, using high through-put grinders, which has increased our ability to process samples by nearly 10-fold.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Tom Arnold


Sian Mary Fisher (2002)

Research on the population ecology of Euphorbia purpurea, or glade spurge

The project has three components, all involving the ecology of rare plant species. The first is our primary focus but I think the other two will provide good learning experiences as well. A.) Research on the population ecology of Euphoribia purpurea, or glade spurge, a globally rare swamp wildflower related to the poinsettia. There are only ca. 30 populations of glade spurge in existence, including six populations in PA; and it is considered threatened or endangered in each of the eight states in which it occurs. In Pennsylvania, students and I have monitored its status regularly at three sites since 1994 and have made occasional trips to the other PA sites with the DCNR and The Nature Conservancy. B.) Proprogation of two other wildflower species for future research and coursework. We will erect a deer exclosure plot at the Reineman Sanctuary and plant there several dozen individuals of Aster radula (rough-leaved aster) and Solidago speciosa (showy goldenrod) plants that are currently in flowerpots. The student and I will work together and will have assistance from Rob Martens of our department and from the sanctuary manager, Lee Schull. These two species are also endangered in PA. C.) Pollination of chestnut trees at the Reineman Wildlife Sanctuary, in collaboration with the American Chestnut Foundation. This involves bagging female flowers to prevent contamination by the wrong type of pollen, and then spreading male pollen from the desired parent tree onto the female flowers within the bags. It is part of a project to breed resistance from a devastating fungal disease, chestnut blight, into the American chestnut and thereby save that tree species from extinction.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Carol Loeffler


Gregory John Fredericks (2000)

The Influence of Microtubules on Actin-based Retrograde Flow in Sea Urchin Coelomic Cells

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: John Henson


Christopher Alan Fried (2005)

Investigating the role of Arp2/3 complex-independent actin polymerization in the cell motility of sea urchin coelomocytes.

Sea urchin blood cells (coelomocytes) are an excellent model experimental system for structure and function studies focused on the "cytoskeleton," the collection of structural and motor proteins in the cell that mediate fundamental processes such as motility, division and signaling. The present study focuses on the impact of the drug butanedione monoxime (BDM) on the polymerization of the actin protein cytoskeleton, a process that helps drive motility in coelomocytes and that depends on the activity of the Arp2/3 protein complex. Our preliminary data with BDM treatment suggests that it is an Arp2/3 complex inhibitor and we plan to use this property in order to investigate the Arp2/3 complex-independent forms of actin polymerization that exist in this cell type. The results of this study should contribute to the overall understanding of the mechanisms underlying actin-based cell motility and increase our knowledge of the pharmacological effects of BDM.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: John Henson


Christopher Alan Fried (2005)

Investigating the role of contractile forces in the cell motility of sea urchin ceolomocytes.

Sea urchin blood cells (coelomocytes) are an excellent model experimental system for structure and function studies focused on the "cytoskeleton," the complex collection of structural and motor proteins that mediates fundamental cell processes such as motility, division and signaling. Our recent work suggests that contractile forces, mediated by the interaction of the structural protein actin and the motor protein myosin, play an integral role in both coelomocyte motility and the overall structuring of cell's cytoskeletal organization. In order to more fully test this hyopothesis we plan to use both morphological and biochemical methods to attempt to determine the extent of actomyosin contractile forces in these cells. The results of this study should contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cell motility.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: John Henson


Christopher Alan Fried (2005)

Investigating the role of Arp2/3 complex-independent actin polymerization in the cell motility of sea urchin coelomocytes.

Sea urchin blood cells (coelomocytes) are an excellent model experimental system for structure and function studies focused on the "cytoskeleton," the collection of structural and motor proteins in the cell that mediate fundamental processes such as motility, division and signaling. The present study focuses on the impact of the drug butanedione monoxime (BDM) on the polymerization of the actin protein cytoskeleton, a process that helps drive motility in coelomocytes and that depends on the activity of the Arp2/3 protein complex. Our preliminary data with BDM treatment suggests that it is an Arp2/3 complex inhibitor and we plan to use this property in order to investigate the Arp2/3 complex-independent forms of actin polymerization that exist in this cell type. The results of this study should contribute to the overall understanding of the mechanisms underlying actin-based cell motility and increase our knowledge of the pharmacological effects of BDM.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: John Henson


Christopher Alan Fried (2005)

Investigating the role of contractile forces in the cell motility of sea urchin ceolomocytes.

Sea urchin blood cells (coelomocytes) are an excellent model experimental system for structure and function studies focused on the "cytoskeleton," the complex collection of structural and motor proteins that mediates fundamental cell processes such as motility, division and signaling. Our recent work suggests that contractile forces, mediated by the interaction of the structural protein actin and the motor protein myosin, play an integral role in both coelomocyte motility and the overall structuring of cell's cytoskeletal organization. In order to more fully test this hyopothesis we plan to use both morphological and biochemical methods to attempt to determine the extent of actomyosin contractile forces in these cells. The results of this study should contribute to our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cell motility.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: John Henson


Christopher Alan Fried (2005)

Investigating the role of Arp2/3 complex-independent actin polymerization in the cell motility of sea urchin coelomocytes.

Sea urchin blood cells (coelomocytes) are an excellent model experimental system for structure and function studies focused on the "cytoskeleton," the collection of structural and motor proteins in the cell that mediate fundamental processes such as motility, division and signaling. The present study focuses on the impact of the drug butanedione monoxime (BDM) on the polymerization of the actin protein cytoskeleton, a process that helps drive motility in coelomocytes and that depends on the activity of the Arp2/3 protein complex. Our preliminary data with BDM treatment suggests that it is an Arp2/3 complex inhibitor and we plan to use this property in order to investigate the Arp2/3 complex-independent forms of actin polymerization that exist in this cell type. The results of this study should contribute to the overall understanding of the mechanisms underlying actin-based cell motility and increase our knowledge of the pharmacological effects of BDM.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: John Henson


Christopher Alan Fried (2005)

Bioinformatics of Subcellular Localization and Changes due to Cancer

The main focus of recent experiments have been to generate computer-based comparisons of the subcellular localization patterns of GFP-tagged proteins in either normal or H-Ras-expressing NIH 3T3 cells. For this work GFP-tagged cell lines were transfected with H-Ras and then the control and Ras transformed lines examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Digital images of protein distribution patterns were analyzed by computer-based comparison programs and those proteins found to show significant changes were targeted for further examination. Dr. Henson's lab concentrated on the changes in localization of the tagged protein Tctex1 a light chain of the microtubule motor protein dynein.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: John Henson


Christopher Jason Gaetano (1997)

Immunolocalization of the Microtubule Motor Protein Kinesin II in Pluteus Stage Echinoderm Embryos

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: John Henson


Damien Garbett (2003)

EGF Receptor Activation in Bovine Cumulus Cells Induces [Ca2 ]i Elevation and Subsequent Cell Death

Last summer I studied the effects of EGF Receptor Activation in Bovince Cumulus Cells (BCC). We observed that EGF stimulus induced an intracellular Ca2+ elevation and subsequent cell death. Towards the end of the summer we began to study the pathways involved in the response and I developed several experiments to determine what pathways were involved for the Ca2+ response, cell death, and cell motility change. I conducted the research with Dr. David Gross at the Lederle Graduate Research Center at UMASS. The lab setting allowed me to design and conduct the experiments first hand with guidance and suggestions from Dr. Gross. The research I conducted was one of the most educational experiences of my life and resulted in future publication and allowed me to present my research at the American Society for Cellular Biology (ASCB) annual meeting in Washington DC. I would like to continue with this project this summer because of how enjoyable and educational the experience was last summer.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor:


Alma Daniela Garcia Perez (2016)

NSF 085670 STEP Program at Dickinson College

Through this program, Dickinson intends to recruit and matriculate a "science posse" cohort in each of three years beginning in the fall of 2009. The science posse program will have three major components: 1) a four-week summer pre-matriculation program in which students will participate in lab research and a series of enrichment workshops in chemistry and mathematics; 2) a second eight-week summer of research with Dickinson faculty members using our successful model of student/faculty research; and 3) a capstone eight-week summer research experience at off-campus laboratories in major research universities. The program will provide a strong mentoring experience for underrepresented students to support their pursuit of a science major. The successful implementation of this plan will result in the establishment of a cohort of science major role models for future students among our underrepresented minority groups. Results of the program will be disseminated widely within the broader scientific education community so that they may serve as a model for other institutions.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: David Kushner


Sheri Gentekos (2000)

Surveys, monitoring and initial planning for experimental study of three rare plant species

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Carol Loeffler


Shawn Ashley Gessay (2014)

Mechanisms of CD14 Expression

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Tiffany Frey


Anastasia Despina Gianakas (2012)

Mechanisms of Cell Process Formation in Sea Urchin Embryos

The cytoskeleton is the system of structural and motor proteins that mediates cell motility, division and shape changes. My laboratory has long used the sea urchin coelomocyte as a model cell system for the study of the cytoskeletal basis of cellular movement and process/protrusion formation. This summer we plan to extend our studies on cell process formation in coelomocytes to the generation of cell processes during the development of the sea urchin embryo. This will involve the microscopic localization of specific cytoskeletal proteins in processes of cells helping mediate embryonic gastrulation, skeletal formation and establishment of the nervous system. We also plan to inhibit process formation by decreasing the expression of specific cytoskeletal proteins via an antisense RNA-based approach. The results of these studies will increase our knowledge concerning the cytoskeletal mechanisms fundamental to cell process formation. This research will be carried out at the MDI Biological Laboratory in Maine in collaboration with Drs. Robert Morris (Wheaton College) and James Coffman (MDIBL).

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: John Henson


Emily Kathryn Gleason (2014)

Sex Differences in the Mouse Retrotrapezoid Nucleus

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: Mary Niblock


Brandon Neville Goldson (2015)

Investigation of Actin Nucleation Factors and Cytoskeletal Structure in Mouse Melanoma Cells

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: John Henson


Michele Anne Gortakowski (2007)

NSF 0110832 RUI: Neural Regulation of Metamorphosis in a Gastropod Mollusc

Development of many types of animals is marked by a dramatic structural transformation, or metamorphosis, between larval and adult forms. Although metamorphosis is gradual and driven by hormones in well-studied developmental systems such as frogs and fruit flies, in other animals it is sudden, rapid, and driven by the larval nervous system. This is especially true in the marine environment, where metamorphosis is triggered by a chemical signal associated with food or habitat required by the adult form. The role of the nervous system in the control of such metamorphoses is poorly understood and has been the focus of Prof. Pires' research for the last decade. Working with larvae of gastropod molluscs (snails), he has shown that one family of chemical signals within the nervous system, the catecholamines, are important regulators of metamorphosis. It is now important to determine if this is a general feature of gastropod metamorphosis or is peculiar to certain species. Differences between species can be considered "experiments of nature" to clarify neurochemical control mechanisms in metamorphosis. Pilot experiments last summer revealed surprising diversity among species, in responses to pharmacological manipulation of endogenous catecholamines. This summer Prof. Pires hopes to see if this diversity can be related to quantitative differences in catecholamine content, or qualitative differences in the distribution of catecholamine-containing cells in larval nervous systems. This project will bring a student into the dynamic research environment of the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories, a world-class center for research in neural and developmental marine biology.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Tony Pires


Charles Edward Griffith (1995)

A Moleular Analysis of Gene Expression during Cell Differentiation

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1994
Professor: Michael Roberts


Nicholas Samuel Gubitosi (2012)

NSF 0744261 RUI: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. The project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors n the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Emily Grace Gvodas (2005)

Development of fluorescence in in situ hybridization using rRNA-based probes for the analysis of gastrointestinal bacteria

The specific objectives for this project would be as follows: 1) develop and implement 16S rRNA-based probe FISH approaches for the analyses of key groups of gastrointestinal microbes; 2) compare the results of these molecular approaches with classical culture-based techniques; and 3) time permitting, use the FISH approaches to investigate the impact of feeding an ingredient of interest on the gastrointestinal microflora composition of the rat. Ms. Greenlee will be an integral part of this project and, with my assistance and the assistance of other members of my group, will conduct the FISH analyses and classical microbiological techniques. Ms. Greenlee will also be involved in the animal studies, where she will participate in feeding, sample collection and processing. Because the project will involve a considerable amount of effort for development, the optimal duration for the internship woud be 10 weeks.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor:


Nicole Christine Hanson (2007)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

Under a previous award the PIs discovered that young, heterotrophic poplar leaves must import carbon resources to be able to respond to insects or jasmonate elicitation with increased phenolic defense synthesis. Increased import, or "Induced Sink Strength" (ISS), determines leaf responsiveness, and helps explain why some leaves are more "inducible" than others and why plant defenses are spatially and temporally heterogenous. This project would examine the generality of ISS by studying two additional plant species whose inducible defenses differ from those in poplar: alkaloids in tomato and glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Young (sink) leaves will be elicted by wounding + oral secretions from insects that stimulate defenses; changes in defense production, carbon and nitrogen import (using stable isotopes), and cell wall invertase then will be assessed. Transport will be blocked with non-damaging steam girdling in some plants to demonstrate the requirement for importation in induced defenses. In addition to alkaloids and glucosinolates in tomato and Arabidopsis, the dependence on ISS of induction of protein defenses (chitinases, polyphenoloxidases, peroxidases, proteinase inhibitors) will be examined in these species and poplar. Previous results suggested that competing sinks may alter leaf responses to elicitation by hampering material or signal transport. A series of experiments is proposed with combinations of the 3 study plants in which the number, size, proximity of and damage to potentially competing sinks (lateral branches, nearby leaves, fruits) is manipulated and the impact on the responsiveness of young target leaves is assessed. The ability of one herbivore to block or enhance responses to a second by feeding nearby on competing or cooperating sinks will be examined. These studies include both correlative m

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: Tom Arnold


Nicole Christine Hanson (2007)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

In YEAR 1 we have succeeded in completing all proposed greenhouse experiments involving hybrid poplar saplings and made progress in establishing Arabidopsis and tomato as model systems in which to examine induced sink strength (ISS), which we hypothesize is a conuuon, first step in general plant wound responses. POPLAR EXPERIMENTS. Along with my co-PIs (Jack Schultz and Heidi Appel) I worked to complete the proposed experiments aimed at testing the ability of wounded poplar foliage to draw in additional resources, via an induction of cell wall invertase activities, to support the production of anti-herbivore defenses. Three large, factorial experiments involving over 500 poplar samplings were completed in the summer of 2006. The ability of induced foliage to import carbohydrates and nitrogen, observed using 1 3C and 1 SN tracers, was assessed with and without disruption of phloem transport and the presence of competing sink tissues, e.g. other wounded branches which compete for resources. These experiments were the largest, most complicated we have attempted since we began this work over eight years ago. ARABIDOPSIS. We have made good progress in developing Arabidopsis as a model system for testing the hypothesis that 155 is a common first step in defense responses. This required some additional effort because it became clear that which this species does possess the ISS response, it reacts a bit differently than poplar. In a series of experiments involving undergraduate students, we tested for the presence or absence of the IS S response in this plant at various developmental stages, in a range of sink and source leaves. The large number of enzyme assays required the development of a new enzyme activity assay, using high through-put grinders, which has increased our ability to process samples by nearly 10-fold.

Term Funded:Spring 2007
Professor: Tom Arnold


Nicole Christine Hanson (2007)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

In YEAR 1 we have succeeded in completing all proposed greenhouse experiments involving hybrid poplar saplings and made progress in establishing Arabidopsis and tomato as model systems in which to examine induced sink strength (ISS), which we hypothesize is a conuuon, first step in general plant wound responses. POPLAR EXPERIMENTS. Along with my co-PIs (Jack Schultz and Heidi Appel) I worked to complete the proposed experiments aimed at testing the ability of wounded poplar foliage to draw in additional resources, via an induction of cell wall invertase activities, to support the production of anti-herbivore defenses. Three large, factorial experiments involving over 500 poplar samplings were completed in the summer of 2006. The ability of induced foliage to import carbohydrates and nitrogen, observed using 1 3C and 1 SN tracers, was assessed with and without disruption of phloem transport and the presence of competing sink tissues, e.g. other wounded branches which compete for resources. These experiments were the largest, most complicated we have attempted since we began this work over eight years ago. ARABIDOPSIS. We have made good progress in developing Arabidopsis as a model system for testing the hypothesis that 155 is a common first step in defense responses. This required some additional effort because it became clear that which this species does possess the ISS response, it reacts a bit differently than poplar. In a series of experiments involving undergraduate students, we tested for the presence or absence of the IS S response in this plant at various developmental stages, in a range of sink and source leaves. The large number of enzyme assays required the development of a new enzyme activity assay, using high through-put grinders, which has increased our ability to process samples by nearly 10-fold.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Tom Arnold


Nicole Christine Hanson (2007)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

Under a previous award the PIs discovered that young, heterotrophic poplar leaves must import carbon resources to be able to respond to insects or jasmonate elicitation with increased phenolic defense synthesis. Increased import, or "Induced Sink Strength" (ISS), determines leaf responsiveness, and helps explain why some leaves are more "inducible" than others and why plant defenses are spatially and temporally heterogenous. This project would examine the generality of ISS by studying two additional plant species whose inducible defenses differ from those in poplar: alkaloids in tomato and glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Young (sink) leaves will be elicted by wounding + oral secretions from insects that stimulate defenses; changes in defense production, carbon and nitrogen import (using stable isotopes), and cell wall invertase then will be assessed. Transport will be blocked with non-damaging steam girdling in some plants to demonstrate the requirement for importation in induced defenses. In addition to alkaloids and glucosinolates in tomato and Arabidopsis, the dependence on ISS of induction of protein defenses (chitinases, polyphenoloxidases, peroxidases, proteinase inhibitors) will be examined in these species and poplar. Previous results suggested that competing sinks may alter leaf responses to elicitation by hampering material or signal transport. A series of experiments is proposed with combinations of the 3 study plants in which the number, size, proximity of and damage to potentially competing sinks (lateral branches, nearby leaves, fruits) is manipulated and the impact on the responsiveness of young target leaves is assessed. The ability of one herbivore to block or enhance responses to a second by feeding nearby on competing or cooperating sinks will be examined. These studies include both correlative m

Term Funded:Fall 2007
Professor: Tom Arnold


Nicole Christine Hanson (2007)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

In YEAR 1 we have succeeded in completing all proposed greenhouse experiments involving hybrid poplar saplings and made progress in establishing Arabidopsis and tomato as model systems in which to examine induced sink strength (ISS), which we hypothesize is a conuuon, first step in general plant wound responses. POPLAR EXPERIMENTS. Along with my co-PIs (Jack Schultz and Heidi Appel) I worked to complete the proposed experiments aimed at testing the ability of wounded poplar foliage to draw in additional resources, via an induction of cell wall invertase activities, to support the production of anti-herbivore defenses. Three large, factorial experiments involving over 500 poplar samplings were completed in the summer of 2006. The ability of induced foliage to import carbohydrates and nitrogen, observed using 1 3C and 1 SN tracers, was assessed with and without disruption of phloem transport and the presence of competing sink tissues, e.g. other wounded branches which compete for resources. These experiments were the largest, most complicated we have attempted since we began this work over eight years ago. ARABIDOPSIS. We have made good progress in developing Arabidopsis as a model system for testing the hypothesis that 155 is a common first step in defense responses. This required some additional effort because it became clear that which this species does possess the ISS response, it reacts a bit differently than poplar. In a series of experiments involving undergraduate students, we tested for the presence or absence of the IS S response in this plant at various developmental stages, in a range of sink and source leaves. The large number of enzyme assays required the development of a new enzyme activity assay, using high through-put grinders, which has increased our ability to process samples by nearly 10-fold.

Term Funded:Fall 2006
Professor: Tom Arnold


Danielle Verlee Hazard (2000)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 1999
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Sprague William Hazard (1999)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 1998
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Jeffrey Todd Heath (2005)

NSF 0336717 Collaborative Research: Coordinate Induction of Sink Strength and Polyphenol Metabolism in Trees

Carbohydrates and secondary metabolism of forest trees, tomato

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Tom Arnold


Evan Robert Hennessy (2011)

NSF 0744261 RUI: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. Evan's project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors n the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Elaine Rachel Herbig (2012)

NASA GCCE Grant: Climate Variability Reduces Frog Resistance to Nematode Infection

Climate Variability Reduces Frog Resistance to Nematode Infection

Term Funded:Fall 2011
Professor: Thomas Raffel


Jeanine McGreevy Herdman (2001)

Actin-Based Retrograde Flow in Sea Urchin Coelomocytes: Development of a Permeabilized Cell Model

The mechanisms underlying how cells move and change shape have puzzled cell biologists for over a hundred years. Although a great deal of detailed molecular knowledge has been generated, many fundamental questions remain unanswered. My lab employs cells isolated from the coelomic fluid of sea urchins (coelomocytes) as an experimental system for studying an aspect of cell motility termed retrograde flow. This process consists of the centripetal movement of the cell surface membrane and underlying protein scaffold (the cytoskeleton) from the cell periphery to the center. The sea urchin coelomocyte has a number of attributes, including ease of isolation, geometry, and optical clarity, which makes it an excellent system for studying this form of motility. However the types of experiments that can be performed with these cells has been limited by the fact that they are not amenable to microinjection. In this proposal we plan to develop a permeabilized cell model of the coelomocyte. In order to do this my students and I will have to test a wide array of permeabilizing agents (detergents and membrane toxins) as well as intracellular buffers. Permeabilized cell models have been instrumental in studying a number of cellular processes including cell division, secretion and intracellular transport. The development of the coelomocyte permeabilized model will allow for us to use membrane impermeant reagents (fluorescent proteins, function blocking antibodies, toxins, etc.) as tools in experiments aimed at gaining a better understanding of the mechanisms mediating the flow process.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: John Henson


Jeanine McGreevy Herdman (2001)

NIH 1R15GM60925-01 Mechanism and Regulation of Actin-based Retrograde Flow

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: John Henson


Jennifer Kay Hibben (2014)

NSF 0918624: Collaborative Research/RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3' portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5' portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny ( )-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: David Kushner


Jennifer Lynn Hoffmann (2000)

Surveys, monitoring and initial planning for experimental study of three rare plant species

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Carol Loeffler


Susan Ann Hollenberg (1990)

Development of a tool to isolate specific Genes in Aspergillus Nidulans

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1989
Professor: Craig Jurgenson


Jamie Yoonjoung Hur (2011)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Spring 2009
Professor: David Kushner


Marianne Hutt (2011)

Immunohistochemical Characterization of Sexually Dimorphic Cells in the Retrotrapezoid Nucleus of the Mouse Brainstem

My lab recently has discovered a difference in the number of activated cells in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) region in male and female mice following carbon dioxide (CO2) exposure. This important region is one of the major players in regulating breathing in response to changes in blood CO2. Our data suggest the interesting possibility that the sexes differ in their thresholds for CO2-activation of the RTN, with males having a lower threshold than females. Because there are many types of cells in the RTN, however, we must verify that the activated cells we have counted are the same cells within the RTN that contribute to CO2 detection. The proposed project will positively identify cells activated by 5% or 10% CO2 in mice of both sexes using antibodies to detect a molecular marker (Phox2b) unique to the RTN CO2-detecting cells. Our data will support (or refute) the existence of a potentially vital sex difference in the RTN.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Mary Niblock


Kristy Beth Jacobus (2005)

Structural genomics analysis using Rho130 as a model

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor:


Maxwell Michael James (2010)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Nina Barbara Jean-Jacques (2011)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Bethany Leigh Jillson-Thornhill (2005)

NSF 0336716 RUI Collaborative Research: Mechanisms of induced pathogen resistance in seagrasses

Seagrass enzyme biomarkers

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Tom Arnold


Rachel Ann Jones (2009)

Structural and Molecular Characterization of a Newly Isolated Bacteriophage Virus

Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria and are of significant interest due to their extreme abundance, importance in the regulation of bacterial population dynamics, and potential usefulness in limiting the growth of harmful bacteria in environmental and biomedical contamination contexts. Dickinson student Rachel Jones will spend 1 week at Dickinson and then 6 weeks at UCLA analyzing the physical structure and DNA sequence of a new bacteriophage virus isolated in Dr. Erin Sanders-Lorenz's lab at UCLA. This characterization will involve transmission electron microscopy and shotgun sequencing methods and will continue at Dickinson in the fall. The research represents a continuation of the productive collaboration between UCLA and Dickinson that was initiated this semester and based on the purchase of a Li-Cor DNA automated sequencer.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: John Henson


Caroline Ellis Jordan (2013)

Investigation of Actin Nucleation Factors and Cytoskeletal Structure in Mouse Melanoma Cells

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: John Henson


Elizabeth G Joseloff (1991)

Regulation of Gene Expression in the Development of Aspergillus Nidulans

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1988
Professor: Craig Jurgenson


Michelle Ferenz Kanther (2004)

Analysis of Pdr5p Mutants that Retain Partial Function

I will be working on a project that has been ongoing for some time now. Using biochemical and genetic techniques, they have been investigating the genetic control of multiple drug resistance in yeast cells. By investigating how the ABC multi-drug transporter Pdr5p functions in yeast cells, they are attempting to understand its role in genetic control of drug resistance. Using gel electrophoresis, membrane preparation, Western blotting, and other techniques, I will be analyzing mutations that alter the recognition properties of Pdr5p. We will be attempting to understand how a single transporer is able to mediate resistance to multiple compounds that are widely varied in their chemical makeup. The major goal of the research will be to investigate how substrates interact with specific binding sites by creating structural and enzymological mutants. These mutants will be prepared for me prior to my arrival and it will be my job to help in the preliminary characterization of such mutants.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor:


Emily R Keller (2004)

Development of Genetic Markers for the Analysis of Population Structure in the Chilean Sea Bass and Antartic Toothfish

The goal of this project is to apply new single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) detection by temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis (TGCE) to discover genetic polymorphisms in two commercially and ecologically important fish species, the Chilean Sea Bass and the Antartic Toothfish. Previous methods of detection by restriction enzyme fragment analysis, microsatellites, protein polymorphisms, and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA have proven to be both time and labor intensive. SNP discovery by TGCE offers the highest output and fewest drawbacks, which is why it will be utilized in this project. The experiment will proceed through 5 steps: collection of skeletal muscle samples from both species, DNA extraction from 48 individuals of each species, PCR of target gene fragments, TGCE screening, and DNA sequencing. The results of this project, combined with Dr. Gaffney's previous research, will hopefully contribute to more effective management of these resources and more useful tools for monitoring and enforcement of harvesting of the two species. The project will be presented at both the division and national conferences of the American Fisheries Society, as well as at Dickinson's own research symposium.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor:


Justin Robert Kiehne (2014)

Biomechanics of Ventilation in Boa Constrictor

Term Funded:Spring 2013 2012-13
Professor: Scott Boback


Jake Olson Kleiner (2013)

Investigation of Actin Nucleation Factors and Cytoskeletal Structure in Mouse Melanoma Cells

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: John Henson


Kristen Michelle Kocher (2012)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Sarah Elizabeth Kolnik (2003)

Molecular Mechanism of Actin-based Retrograde Flow in Sea Urchin Ceolomocytes

Cell motility, which plays a fundamental role in a number of crucial cell processes including migration, cell division, and secretion, is mediated by a host of motor and structural proteins know collectively as "the cytoskeleton." In this proposal we plan to extend our studies on the cytoskeletal mechanisms underlying a specific form of motility termed retrograde flow. This flow process involves the movement of the cell's membrane and underlying cytoskeletal scaffold from the cell periphery towards the cell center and it is present in the majority of nucleated cells. The sea urchin coelomocyte offers a number of distinct advantages as a model experimental system for studying retrograde flow, including ease of isolation, lack of cytoskeletal complexity and optical clarity. We plan to use coelomocytes combined with pharmacological treatments, digitally-enhanced video microscopy, and immunofluorescent localization microscopy to extend our understanding of the molecular mechanisms which mediate retrograde flow.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: John Henson


Sarah Elizabeth Kolnik (2003)

The role of the cytoskeleton in the cytotoxic functions of the sea urchin coelomocyte

My laboratory has employed sea urchin blood cells (called coelomocytes) as a model experimental system for the study of cell motility, a process that is medicated by a series of structural and motor proteins know collectively as the "cytoskeleton." A major long-term goal of this research is to understand the structural, functional and regulatory mechanisms underlying the cytoskeletal dynamics which help cell's mediate motility, shape changes an intracellular transport. A related goal is to determine how the cytoskeletal mechanisms we identify in coelomocytes contribute to the in vivo functioning of these cells. Several recent literature papers indicate that the subpopulation of coelomocytes historically referred to as "phagocytic amoebocytes" perform primitive immune functions including Natural Killer (NK) cell-like cytotoxic activity (Lin et al., 2001, J. Exp. Zool. 290:741) and he production and secretion of Complement factors (Gross et al., 2000, Immunogenetics 51:1034; Smith et al., 2001, Immunol. Rev. 180:16).

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: John Henson


Sarah Elizabeth Kolnik (2003)

Molecular Mechanism of Actin-based Retrograde Flow in Sea Urchin Ceolomocytes

Cell motility, which plays a fundamental role in a number of crucial cell processes including migration, cell division, and secretion, is mediated by a host of motor and structural proteins know collectively as "the cytoskeleton." In this proposal we plan to extend our studies on the cytoskeletal mechanisms underlying a specific form of motility termed retrograde flow. This flow process involves the movement of the cell's membrane and underlying cytoskeletal scaffold from the cell periphery towards the cell center and it is present in the majority of nucleated cells. The sea urchin coelomocyte offers a number of distinct advantages as a model experimental system for studying retrograde flow, including ease of isolation, lack of cytoskeletal complexity and optical clarity. We plan to use coelomocytes combined with pharmacological treatments, digitally-enhanced video microscopy, and immunofluorescent localization microscopy to extend our understanding of the molecular mechanisms which mediate retrograde flow.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: John Henson


Sarah Elizabeth Kolnik (2003)

The role of the cytoskeleton in the cytotoxic functions of the sea urchin coelomocyte

My laboratory has employed sea urchin blood cells (called coelomocytes) as a model experimental system for the study of cell motility, a process that is medicated by a series of structural and motor proteins know collectively as the "cytoskeleton." A major long-term goal of this research is to understand the structural, functional and regulatory mechanisms underlying the cytoskeletal dynamics which help cell's mediate motility, shape changes an intracellular transport. A related goal is to determine how the cytoskeletal mechanisms we identify in coelomocytes contribute to the in vivo functioning of these cells. Several recent literature papers indicate that the subpopulation of coelomocytes historically referred to as "phagocytic amoebocytes" perform primitive immune functions including Natural Killer (NK) cell-like cytotoxic activity (Lin et al., 2001, J. Exp. Zool. 290:741) and he production and secretion of Complement factors (Gross et al., 2000, Immunogenetics 51:1034; Smith et al., 2001, Immunol. Rev. 180:16).

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: John Henson


Heather Oliver Kot (1999)

NIH- 1R15GM47693-01 Cytoskeletal Dynamics during Dell Shape Changes

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: John Henson


Tasha Kouvatsos (2005)

A DNA Microarray Analysis of Human Leukemia Cell Differentiation

DNA microarrays have enabled scientists to study changes in gene expression in living cells by examining thousands of genes in a single experiment. In the experiments described here, DNA microarrays will be used to examine changes in gene expression during the differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) into granulocytes or eosinophils. A microarray analysis HL-60 cell differentiation into macrophages is currently nearing completion. Once identified, genes that are significantly up-regulated or down-regulated will be compared for the three pathways and confirmatory experiments will be preformed by conventional, "one gene at a time" methods. The significance of these experiments goes beyond the study of cell differentiation, since in all three cases, rapidly dividing cancer cells are being converted into non-dividing "normal" cells.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Michael Roberts


Tasha Kouvatsos (2005)

A DNA Microarray Analysis of Human Leukemia Cell Differentiation

DNA microarrays have enabled scientists to study changes in gene expression in living cells by examining thousands of genes in a single experiment. In the experiments described here, DNA microarrays will be used to examine changes in gene expression during the differentiation of human promyelocytic leukemia cells (HL-60) into granulocytes or eosinophils. A microarray analysis HL-60 cell differentiation into macrophages is currently nearing completion. Once identified, genes that are significantly up-regulated or down-regulated will be compared for the three pathways and confirmatory experiments will be preformed by conventional, "one gene at a time" methods. The significance of these experiments goes beyond the study of cell differentiation, since in all three cases, rapidly dividing cancer cells are being converted into non-dividing "normal" cells.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Michael Roberts


Paul Michael Kretzer (2004)

NSF 0336716 RUI Collaborative Research: Mechanisms of induced pathogen resistance in seagrasses

Nutrient enrichment and seagrass phenolic metabolism

Term Funded:Fall 2003
Professor: Tom Arnold


Paul Michael Kretzer (2004)

Testing the Biological Activity of Cis and Trans Photoisomers of Phenylpropanoid Compounds

Depletion of the ozone layer has resulted in an increase in the exposure of terrestrial plants to ultraviolet-B radiation. This damages many species of plants and in some cases may have a significant impact on agricultural productivity. One mechanism by which plants are thought to protect themselves from these effects is by synthesis of flavonoids and related compounds that function as natural sunscreens. These compounds are derived from phenylalanine, which is metabolized through thr phenylpropanoid pathway, leading to formation of flavonoids and also to the cell wall structural element lignin. The phenylpropanoid pathway appears to be regulated both at the level of gene transcription and by product inhibition of key enzymes by intermediates of the pathway. Specifically, regulation may occur through cis-trans photoisomerization of intermediates of the pathway, whose isomeric forms have a differential effect on the activity of the enzymes that form them. Using high performance liquid chromatography, we propse to prepare and isolate the cis and trans isomers of a number of these compounds. We will then test their biological activity by observing their effects on flavonoid synthesis and lignin formation in excised plant tissues. These results will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of damage and resistance to ultraviolet radiation in higher plants.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Tom Brennan


Paul Michael Kretzer (2004)

NSF 0336716 RUI Collaborative Research: Mechanisms of induced pathogen resistance in seagrasses

Nutrient enrichment and seagrass phenolic metabolism

Term Funded:Spring 2004
Professor: Tom Arnold


Paul Michael Kretzer (2004)

Testing the Biological Activity of Cis and Trans Photoisomers of Phenylpropanoid Compounds

Depletion of the ozone layer has resulted in an increase in the exposure of terrestrial plants to ultraviolet-B radiation. This damages many species of plants and in some cases may have a significant impact on agricultural productivity. One mechanism by which plants are thought to protect themselves from these effects is by synthesis of flavonoids and related compounds that function as natural sunscreens. These compounds are derived from phenylalanine, which is metabolized through thr phenylpropanoid pathway, leading to formation of flavonoids and also to the cell wall structural element lignin. The phenylpropanoid pathway appears to be regulated both at the level of gene transcription and by product inhibition of key enzymes by intermediates of the pathway. Specifically, regulation may occur through cis-trans photoisomerization of intermediates of the pathway, whose isomeric forms have a differential effect on the activity of the enzymes that form them. Using high performance liquid chromatography, we propse to prepare and isolate the cis and trans isomers of a number of these compounds. We will then test their biological activity by observing their effects on flavonoid synthesis and lignin formation in excised plant tissues. These results will provide a better understanding of the mechanisms of damage and resistance to ultraviolet radiation in higher plants.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Tom Brennan


Afif Naji Kulaylat (2007)

A Proteomics Approach to Human Leukemia Cell Differentiation

Human leukemia cells can be induced in culture to become cells with normal growth properties. This reversion form cancer cell to "normal " cell has profound implications for cancer treatment and for the understanding of cell differentiation, the process by which embryonic cells specialize into specific cell types. This study seeks to understand the molecular mechanisms by which cancer cells are transformed into normal cells, using state-of-the art technology in the newly evolved field of protemics. Genetic "re-programming" occurs as the leukemia cells are coaxed into "remembering" the traits of the normal cells from which they were derived. The remembered normal cell program then directs the cells to actually become the cells of their origin, in this system, white blood cells called macrophages. The genetic program is manifested in the kinds of proteins present in the cells and their relative amounts. Human cells contain tens of thousands of different proteins and their relative abundances distinguish a muscle cell from a kidney cell, neuron from skin and even a cancer cell from its normal counterpart. Proteomics is the study of the global repertoire of proteins within a cell. Using a newly developed technique, difference gel electrophoresis (DIGE), we propose to identify changes in the protein repertoire of leukemia cells as they revert back to macrophages.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Michal Roberts


Kelly Marie LaRue (2009)

NSF 0744261 RUI: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. Evan's project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors n the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:Fall 2008
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Kelly Marie LaRue (2009)

NSF 0744261 RUI: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. Evan's project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors n the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:Spring 2009
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Jennifer Reine Lloyd Langston (2008)

Neurochemical Control of Development in Larvae of Marine Polychaete Worms

This proposal seeks funding for Prof. Tony Pires to work with a student for 3 weeks on campus and 4 weeks at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories in the summer of 2007. We will investigate the neural control of metamorphosis by nitric oxide signaling in larvae of marine polychaete worms. This project will use neurochemical, optical and microanatomical methods to study how the nervous system directs rapid and radical developmental changes in immature animals. While on campus, Pires and the student will collaborate with Prof. William Biggers of Wilkes University. Biggers is a biochemist with expertise in polychaete larval biology and nitric oxide biochemistry. At Friday Harbor, Pires and the student will interact with a vigorous international community of scientists. It is anticipated that the project will be reported as a co-authored presentation at the national meeting of the Society for Integrative and Comparative Biology in January 2008.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Tony Pires


Hannah Marie Leahey (2012)

NASA GCCE Grant: Carbon Enrichment Technology

Carbon Enrichment Technology

Term Funded:summer 2011
Professor: Tom Arnold


Brandon Jongwon Lee (2010)

NSF 0744261 RUI: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. The project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors n the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:Fall 2009
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Esther Sun Lee (1998)

Enzymatic Activation of Naturally Occurring Photosensitizers

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: Thomas Brennan


Bryan Daniel Lerner (2014)

NSF 0918624: Collaborative Research/RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3' portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5' portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny ( )-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:summer 2012
Professor: David Kushner


Katherine Anne Lestitian (2003)

Ecology, demography, and recovery of a rare wildflower Euphorbia Purpurea

Long-term studies that students and I have carried out on Pennsylvania populations of glade spurge, Euphorbia purpurea, indicate that this globally rare and scientifically interesting wildflower is declining locally. Sexual reproduction is necessary for the maintenance of the population size. However, seedlings are rare and survival of young plants is poor, even after five or six years of growth. This summer I hope to 1) continue long-term monitoring at all five sites, 2) assess the effects of new deer fences and removal of competing vegetation on performance of the plants at three locations, 3) complete initial location of plants in two more recently located populations, with particular attention to small plants such as seedlings that may have been overlooked, 4) experiment to determine the best conditions for rearing seedlings, and 5) work up certain portions of our long-term data set that have remained unanalyzed until now because of time constraints.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Carol Loeffler


Samantha Brooke Levin (2013)

Identification of Central Chemoreceptors in the Mouse Brainstem

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: Mary Niblock


Rebecca Diane Levit (2002)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 2002
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Joshua Sturgess Lichtman (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Fall 2006
Professor: David Kushner


Joshua Sturgess Lichtman (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Spring 2007
Professor: David Kushner


Joshua Sturgess Lichtman (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: David Kushner


Joshua Sturgess Lichtman (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Fall 2006
Professor: David Kushner


Joshua Sturgess Lichtman (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Fall 2007
Professor: David Kushner


Kristen Nicole Liebig (2014)

Mechanisms of CD14 Expression

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: Tiffany Frey


Wai Wai Lin (2009)

Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) - host interaction studies: in vivo evolution of TCV sattelite RNA (completion of a laboratory research project originating from Biology 419) and analysis of host chemical response to TCV

Evolution is controversial; a flaw of the "pro-evolution" argument is that demonstration of evolution in the lab setting is challenging. Currently, students in Biology 419 RNA (ribonucleic acid), are performing a semester-long lab module examining evolution of viral RNA - which RNA, from a pool of RNAs, allows for function. Only recently has it been learned that RNA is multifunctional within cells. The study of RNA viruses allows a unique perspective on understanding RNA function, since the virus uses only RNA (and never DNA) to code for proteins, or simply the RNA itself, for function. Part of the summer research is designed to complete the experiments and data analysis from the semester-long evolution experiment, and to initiate follow-up studies in collaboration with Anne Simon, Ph.D. (Univ. of MD). In addition, the spread of the virus throughout the host vascular system will be examined in a collaboration with Tom Arnold (Biology), who is currently tracking vascular flow rates in other plant species under the auspices of a current NSF grant.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: David Kushner


Stephanie Ann Long (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Fall 2006
Professor: David Kushner


Stephanie Ann Long (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Fall 2006
Professor: David Kushner


Stephanie Ann Long (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Spring 2007
Professor: David Kushner


Kurt Matthew Lucin (2002)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 2001
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Ashly Elizabeth Lukoskie (2005)

Integrated Protein Informatics for Cancer Research

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: John Henson


Christopher Robert Magel (2004)

Dopamine Receptors

Dopamine receptors are important structures that interact with neurons all throughout the body via the neurological system. They have been said to play a major role in regulating neuronal motor control, cognition, and vacular function. Its degradation has been connected to many neuro-degenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Huntington's disease, and Parkinson's disease. All of these diseases are caused by the slow, irreversible, and progressive death of neurons in the brain and can be seen as a function of aging. As of right now no cure has been discovered. The Laboratory of Molecular Neurochemistry at Georgetown University, and specifically Dr. Anita Sidhu, has been researching dopamine receptors to better understand how interactions with these receptors by various molecular players help to either slow down or accelerate neuro-degeneration.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor:


Christopher Robert Magel (2004)

Radiotelemetry Study of Summer Movements in Allegheny Woodrat (Neotoma magister) Populations

The allegheny woodrat is a native mammal designated as threatened or endangered in all the states of its range in the northeastern US. Our previous studies suggest that its long-term existence may depend on effective dispersal between habitat patches, but so far there are no measurements of when, and how far, woodrats are capable of dispersing. I propose to use Whitaker funds to include a student collaborator in a radiotelemetry study already funded by the Pennsylvania Wild Resource Conservation Fund. My student collaborator and I will live-trap and radiocollar up to 12 woodrats in a local population and then will monitor their position during June and July. In a follow-up session, I will repeat the monitoring for three weeks in August-September. The data from this study, in conjunction with a parallel effort by collaborator Dr. John Peles of Penn State McKeesport, will allow us to quantify the density of woodrats on and around their primary rock outcrop habitat, their likelihood of shifting den sites, and the timing and distance of dispersal of juvenile woodrats, all key pieces of information for modeling the future of this species and for developing a general model for biodiversity of patchily distributed small mammals in Pennsylvania.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Janet Wright


Aimee Lee Malesky (2005)

Assessing islet function after exposure to enzymes and enzyme by-products. Rita Bottino Ph.D., Director Islet Core, Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh.

The Islet Core laboratory is involved in the isolation and purification of human and animal islets of Langerhans for clinical as well as experimental use. One of the current lines of research of our lab focuses on the recognition of factors that affect islet survival following isolation. Among the possible causes for early islet failure after transplantation, the effect of exogenous enzymes utilized for the separation of islets from the pancreatic tissue is not well known. In the upcoming summer we intend to perform a series of experiments to determine the consequences of isolation enzymes on islet survival in culture as well as in experimental transplants in vivo. All the technologies for testing islet function in vitro and in vivo are already established in our lab. It would be a great opportunity to involve Aimee in this project and specifically to carry out, with our supervision, the experiments that can finally establish a role for isolation enzymes on islet performance.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor:


Matthew Stephen Manganaro (2009)

NSF 0744261: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. The project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Matthew Stephen Manganaro (2009)

NSF 0744261 RUI: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. Evan's project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors n the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Antonio David Marrero (2013)

Mechanisms of CD14 Expression

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Tiffany Frey


Antonio David Marrero (2013)

Characterization of Myosin-XIX (MYO19), a Novel Actin-Based Motor

n/a

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Scott Boback


Mohammed Hakim Masab (2013)

In Vivo Evolution of a Viral RNA II

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: David Kushner


Mohammed Hakim Masab (2013)

Invivo Evolution of a Viral RNA

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: David Kushner


Mohammed Hakim Masab (2013)

Sequence-structure-function analysis of a viral RNA

In the USA, crop loss due to infection by plant pathogens (including viruses) exceeds 30 billion dollars annually. In the environment, plant virus genomes, and virus-associated RNAs (satellite RNAs) can evolve to enhance symptom severity. A major question in RNA virology is "what makes an RNA infectious?" Viral RNA sequence and/or structure is often linked to RNA function, which can include infectiousness. Due to its small size, the satellite RNA C (satC) from Turnip crinkle virus is an excellent model for identification and characterization of RNA sequences and/or structures involved in virus replication and pathogenesis. Using an in vivo evolution approach, portions of satC RNA can be randomized, pools of these random satC used to infect turnip plants, and functional satCs can be recovered from plants, allowing for identification of sequences and/or structures formed by these sequences that mediate satC function in plants. Here, we seek to determine sequence/structure requirements in a portion of satC that mediate a step in replication (copying) of the satC RNA. Dr. Kushner has obtained NSF funding for this project; the second of 2 parts of the project will be initiated in his Bio 419 course in Spring '12. Several students have worked on the project since it started in Spring '10. Two students will continue working on the project during summer 2012 -- stipend/housing for one of these students will be paid from NSF grant money; previously it was agreed that the stipend/housing for the second student would be paid for by the college.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: David Kushner


Carole Anne McBride (2004)

Computational and Laboratory stuey of p16/Ink4 Mutations"

This project focuses on exploring the relationship among gene evolution and mutation, protein function and structure, and disease (cancer). This will be accomplished by using computational and experimental approaches to predict and test whether mutations in tumor suppressor genes, such as the p16/CDKN2a gene, alter protein function. In the case of CDKN2a, evolutionary and structural patterns are being examined to predict which variants might affect the protein, creating mutant p16 proteins, and to test whether the mutated proteins retain or lose the ability to cause cell cycle arrest. The data gathered in this study will then be employed in the Vermont Cancer Center's ultimate goal of understanding and utilizing this knowledge to aid in early cancer diagnosis and/or prevention.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor:


Mary Kathryn McClellan (2007)

Bioinformatics of Subcellular Localization and Changes due to Cancer

During the period 2005-2006, Dr. Henson's lab has continued to collaborate with the labs of Drs. Robert Murphy and Jon Jarvik at CMU on the project entitled "Bioinformatics of Subcellular Localization and Changes due to Cancer". The work has involved the participation of Dickinson undergraduate Mary McClellan.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor:


Julia Brumbaugh McMahon (2015)

NSF 085670 STEP Program at Dickinson College

Through this program, Dickinson intends to recruit and matriculate a "science posse" cohort in each of three years beginning in the fall of 2009. The science posse program will have three major components: 1) a four-week summer pre-matriculation program in which students will participate in lab research and a series of enrichment workshops in chemistry and mathematics; 2) a second eight-week summer of research with Dickinson faculty members using our successful model of student/faculty research; and 3) a capstone eight-week summer research experience at off-campus laboratories in major research universities. The program will provide a strong mentoring experience for underrepresented students to support their pursuit of a science major. The successful implementation of this plan will result in the establishment of a cohort of science major role models for future students among our underrepresented minority groups. Results of the program will be disseminated widely within the broader scientific education community so that they may serve as a model for other institutions.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: David Kushner


Julia Brumbaugh McMahon (2015)

Effects of Ocean Acidification on Development of a Marine Mollusc Larva

Effects of Ocean Acidification on Development of a Marine Mollusc Larva

Term Funded:Summer 2014
Professor: Tony Pires


Christopher James Mealey (2013)

NASA GCCE Grant: Carbon Enrichment Technology

Carbon Enrichment Technology

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: Tom Arnold


Christopher James Mealey (2013)

Ecophysiology of Marine Organisms

n/a

Term Funded:Spring 2011
Professor: Thomas Arnold


Angela Emer Medrano (2016)

NSF 085670 STEP Program at Dickinson College

Through this program, Dickinson intends to recruit and matriculate a "science posse" cohort in each of three years beginning in the fall of 2009. The science posse program will have three major components: 1) a four-week summer pre-matriculation program in which students will participate in lab research and a series of enrichment workshops in chemistry and mathematics; 2) a second eight-week summer of research with Dickinson faculty members using our successful model of student/faculty research; and 3) a capstone eight-week summer research experience at off-campus laboratories in major research universities. The program will provide a strong mentoring experience for underrepresented students to support their pursuit of a science major. The successful implementation of this plan will result in the establishment of a cohort of science major role models for future students among our underrepresented minority groups. Results of the program will be disseminated widely within the broader scientific education community so that they may serve as a model for other institutions.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: John Henson


Sara Meerbeke (2010)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

Under a previous award the PIs discovered that young, heterotrophic poplar leaves must import carbon resources to be able to respond to insects or jasmonate elicitation with increased phenolic defense synthesis. Increased import, or "Induced Sink Strength" (ISS), determines leaf responsiveness, and helps explain why some leaves are more "inducible" than others and why plant defenses are spatially and temporally heterogenous. This project would examine the generality of ISS by studying two additional plant species whose inducible defenses differ from those in poplar: alkaloids in tomato and glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Young (sink) leaves will be elicted by wounding + oral secretions from insects that stimulate defenses; changes in defense production, carbon and nitrogen import (using stable isotopes), and cell wall invertase then will be assessed. Transport will be blocked with non-damaging steam girdling in some plants to demonstrate the requirement for importation in induced defenses. In addition to alkaloids and glucosinolates in tomato and Arabidopsis, the dependence on ISS of induction of protein defenses (chitinases, polyphenoloxidases, peroxidases, proteinase inhibitors) will be examined in these species and poplar. Previous results suggested that competing sinks may alter leaf responses to elicitation by hampering material or signal transport. A series of experiments is proposed with combinations of the 3 study plants in which the number, size, proximity of and damage to potentially competing sinks (lateral branches, nearby leaves, fruits) is manipulated and the impact on the responsiveness of young target leaves is assessed. The ability of one herbivore to block or enhance responses to a second by feeding nearby on competing or cooperating sinks will be examined. These studies include both correlative m

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: Tom Arnold


Sara Meerbeke (2010)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

Under a previous award the PIs discovered that young, heterotrophic poplar leaves must import carbon resources to be able to respond to insects or jasmonate elicitation with increased phenolic defense synthesis. Increased import, or "Induced Sink Strength" (ISS), determines leaf responsiveness, and helps explain why some leaves are more "inducible" than others and why plant defenses are spatially and temporally heterogenous. This project would examine the generality of ISS by studying two additional plant species whose inducible defenses differ from those in poplar: alkaloids in tomato and glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Young (sink) leaves will be elicted by wounding + oral secretions from insects that stimulate defenses; changes in defense production, carbon and nitrogen import (using stable isotopes), and cell wall invertase then will be assessed. Transport will be blocked with non-damaging steam girdling in some plants to demonstrate the requirement for importation in induced defenses. In addition to alkaloids and glucosinolates in tomato and Arabidopsis, the dependence on ISS of induction of protein defenses (chitinases, polyphenoloxidases, peroxidases, proteinase inhibitors) will be examined in these species and poplar. Previous results suggested that competing sinks may alter leaf responses to elicitation by hampering material or signal transport. A series of experiments is proposed with combinations of the 3 study plants in which the number, size, proximity of and damage to potentially competing sinks (lateral branches, nearby leaves, fruits) is manipulated and the impact on the responsiveness of young target leaves is assessed. The ability of one herbivore to block or enhance responses to a second by feeding nearby on competing or cooperating sinks will be examined. These studies include both correlative m

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Tom Arnold


Caitlin Anne Mehalick (2010)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Ora Elizabeth Mika (2007)

NSF 0336717 Collaborative Research: Coordinate Induction of Sink Strength and Polyphenol Metabolism in Trees

Carbohydrates and secondary metabolism of forest trees, tomato

Term Funded:Spring 2006
Professor: Tom Arnold


Ora Elizabeth Mika (2007)

NSF 0336717 Collaborative Research: Coordinate Induction of Sink Strength and Polyphenol Metabolism in Trees

Carbohydrates and secondary metabolism of forest trees, tomato

Term Funded:Fall 2005
Professor: Tom Arnold


Ora Elizabeth Mika (2007)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

In YEAR 1 we have succeeded in completing all proposed greenhouse experiments involving hybrid poplar saplings and made progress in establishing Arabidopsis and tomato as model systems in which to examine induced sink strength (ISS), which we hypothesize is a conuuon, first step in general plant wound responses. POPLAR EXPERIMENTS. Along with my co-PIs (Jack Schultz and Heidi Appel) I worked to complete the proposed experiments aimed at testing the ability of wounded poplar foliage to draw in additional resources, via an induction of cell wall invertase activities, to support the production of anti-herbivore defenses. Three large, factorial experiments involving over 500 poplar samplings were completed in the summer of 2006. The ability of induced foliage to import carbohydrates and nitrogen, observed using 1 3C and 1 SN tracers, was assessed with and without disruption of phloem transport and the presence of competing sink tissues, e.g. other wounded branches which compete for resources. These experiments were the largest, most complicated we have attempted since we began this work over eight years ago. ARABIDOPSIS. We have made good progress in developing Arabidopsis as a model system for testing the hypothesis that 155 is a common first step in defense responses. This required some additional effort because it became clear that which this species does possess the ISS response, it reacts a bit differently than poplar. In a series of experiments involving undergraduate students, we tested for the presence or absence of the IS S response in this plant at various developmental stages, in a range of sink and source leaves. The large number of enzyme assays required the development of a new enzyme activity assay, using high through-put grinders, which has increased our ability to process samples by nearly 10-fold.

Term Funded:Spring 2007
Professor: Tom Arnold


Ora Elizabeth Mika (2007)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

In YEAR 1 we have succeeded in completing all proposed greenhouse experiments involving hybrid poplar saplings and made progress in establishing Arabidopsis and tomato as model systems in which to examine induced sink strength (ISS), which we hypothesize is a conuuon, first step in general plant wound responses. POPLAR EXPERIMENTS. Along with my co-PIs (Jack Schultz and Heidi Appel) I worked to complete the proposed experiments aimed at testing the ability of wounded poplar foliage to draw in additional resources, via an induction of cell wall invertase activities, to support the production of anti-herbivore defenses. Three large, factorial experiments involving over 500 poplar samplings were completed in the summer of 2006. The ability of induced foliage to import carbohydrates and nitrogen, observed using 1 3C and 1 SN tracers, was assessed with and without disruption of phloem transport and the presence of competing sink tissues, e.g. other wounded branches which compete for resources. These experiments were the largest, most complicated we have attempted since we began this work over eight years ago. ARABIDOPSIS. We have made good progress in developing Arabidopsis as a model system for testing the hypothesis that 155 is a common first step in defense responses. This required some additional effort because it became clear that which this species does possess the ISS response, it reacts a bit differently than poplar. In a series of experiments involving undergraduate students, we tested for the presence or absence of the IS S response in this plant at various developmental stages, in a range of sink and source leaves. The large number of enzyme assays required the development of a new enzyme activity assay, using high through-put grinders, which has increased our ability to process samples by nearly 10-fold.

Term Funded:Fall 2006
Professor: Tom Arnold


Matthew William Miller (2013)

Ecological Consequences of Nest Site Selection in the Painted Turtle

Ecological Consequences of Nest Site Selection in the Painted Turtle

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: Scott Boback


Matthew William Miller (2013)

Ecological and environmental consequences of nest site selection in the Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta)

In contrast to most vertebrates which possess sex chromosomes, the gender of many reptile species is determined by the temperature experienced during the middle third of embryonic development. Consequently, the sex ratio, a critical demographic parameter, is strongly influenced by changes in environmental temperature. As such, climate change can and will have major impacts on the survival of species which exhibit this strategy known as temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD). In this study we will monitor environmental and ecological parameters which determine hatchling survival in the eastern Painted Turtle (Chrysemys picta). Nest temperatures will be obtained using miniature data loggers and a suite of environmental parameters will be recorded for each nest. By recording and analyzing these variables, we will begin to understand how females choose nest sites and how the environment, both current and future, can impact these populations. Therefore, our research will contribute to our understanding of the biological consequences of global climate change.

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: Scott Boback


Jennifer L Miller-Picarsic (2003)

Development of Gene Therapy for Early Lung Cancer using Novel In Vitro Model of Lung Cancer

The Pittsburgh Tissue Engineering Initiative (PTEI) is an engineering growth project, which is playing a key role in the advancement and education of biomedical research, both locally and internationally. In 1997 the PTEI established a summer internship program for undergraduate students from 10 Southwestern Pennsylvanian counties, for students who are pursuing future career goals in medicine, engineering, research, or related fields. Each intern is paired with his/her research mentor at one of PTEI's six funded hospitals or universities. During the 10-week internship (contingent upon receiving HHMI grant), I would be working with Joseph M. Pilewski, M.D. of the University of Pittsburgh Biomedical Center. I would engage in research focused on using gene vectors, in an originally designed in vitro lung cancer model of normal and malignant lung cancer cells, to test for genes that could abolish malignant cells while preserving the normal cell lining.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor:


Patrick Lennon Millet (2007)

Continued Analysis of Role of the Phosphatase siw14p in BMV RNA Replication

Studies of virus-host interaction can illustrate how viruses manipulate host-cell machinery to propagate their genetic material, yet also elucidate enhanced understanding of cellular processes. Positive-strand RNA ((+)ssRNA) viruses include pathogens such as hepatitis C virus, West Nile virus, and the SARS coronavirus. The plant pathogen Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a representative (+)ssRNA virus whose life cycle has been reproduced in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previous yeast genomic studies have indicated that siw14p, a protein phosphatase, is critical for BMV RNA replication. To enhance understanding of how SIW14 causes this BMV replication defect, this study seeks to analyze BMV replication in the presence of SIW14 phosphatase mutants and begin to determine the direct target of siw14p activity. Furthermore, to better understand SIW14 general function in the cell, completion of current DNA microarray studies, analyzing genome-wide yeast transcription in the presence and absence of SIW1 will be pursued.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: David Kushner


Patrick Lennon Millet (2007)

Continued Analysis of Role of the Phosphatase siw14p in BMV RNA Replication

Studies of virus-host interaction can illustrate how viruses manipulate host-cell machinery to propagate their genetic material, yet also elucidate enhanced understanding of cellular processes. Positive-strand RNA ((+)ssRNA) viruses include pathogens such as hepatitis C virus, West Nile virus, and the SARS coronavirus. The plant pathogen Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a representative (+)ssRNA virus whose life cycle has been reproduced in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Previous yeast genomic studies have indicated that siw14p, a protein phosphatase, is critical for BMV RNA replication. To enhance understanding of how SIW14 causes this BMV replication defect, this study seeks to analyze BMV replication in the presence of SIW14 phosphatase mutants and begin to determine the direct target of siw14p activity. Furthermore, to better understand SIW14 general function in the cell, completion of current DNA microarray studies, analyzing genome-wide yeast transcription in the presence and absence of SIW1 will be pursued.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: David Kushner


Nana Kwaku Minkah (2005)

Host gene expression changes caused by a novel protein phosphatase.

Yeast, a powerful model eukaryotic research system, features striking similarity to humans on the genetic level. While sequencing the yeast genome led to the identification of 6000 yeast genes, elucidation of function of several proteins encoded by those genes has yet to occur. One gene, SIW14, has shown to encode a protein phosphatase, yet the cellular protein targets of this enzyme remain unknown. As proteins are often regulated by kinases and phosphatases, understanding these pathways is critical for determining cellular function. Since the phosphorylation status of proteins is often key to the regulation of gene expression, this study aims to employ microarray technolgoy to identify downstream targets of SIW14. Furthermore, as the protein product of SIW14 is critical for brome mosaic virus (BMV) to copy its genetic material (replicate), a long-term goal of this line of investigation is to further understand the role of SIW14 in BMV RNA replication.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: David Kushner


Nana Kwaku Minkah (2005)

Host gene expression changes caused by a novel protein phosphatase.

Yeast, a powerful model eukaryotic research system, features striking similarity to humans on the genetic level. While sequencing the yeast genome led to the identification of 6000 yeast genes, elucidation of function of several proteins encoded by those genes has yet to occur. One gene, SIW14, has shown to encode a protein phosphatase, yet the cellular protein targets of this enzyme remain unknown. As proteins are often regulated by kinases and phosphatases, understanding these pathways is critical for determining cellular function. Since the phosphorylation status of proteins is often key to the regulation of gene expression, this study aims to employ microarray technolgoy to identify downstream targets of SIW14. Furthermore, as the protein product of SIW14 is critical for brome mosaic virus (BMV) to copy its genetic material (replicate), a long-term goal of this line of investigation is to further understand the role of SIW14 in BMV RNA replication.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: David Kushner


Jeffrey Vincent Mitten (1997)

Electrophysiological Study of Metamorphosis in Gastropod Molluscs

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: Tony Pires


Noah Raphael Morgenstein (2011)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Joanne Cissel Morton (1997)

A Molecular Analysis of Gene Expression during Cell Differentiation

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1995
Professor: Michael Roberts


Joanne Cissel Morton (1997)

A Molecular Analysis of Gene Expression during Cell Differentiation

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1995
Professor: Michael Roberts


Jennifer Ann Moyer (1990)

Karyotypes of Cylindrocystis

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1988
Professor: Paul Biebel


Allison Margaret Murawski (2012)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Connor Thomas Murphy (2005)

Integrated Protein Informatics for Cancer Research

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: John Henson


Heidi Ann Murray (2003)

The role of the cytoskeleton in the cytotoxic functions of the sea urchin coelomocyte

My laboratory has employed sea urchin blood cells (called coelomocytes) as a model experimental system for the study of cell motility, a process that is medicated by a series of structural and motor proteins know collectively as the "cytoskeleton." A major long-term goal of this research is to understand the structural, functional and regulatory mechanisms underlying the cytoskeletal dynamics which help cell's mediate motility, shape changes an intracellular transport. A related goal is to determine how the cytoskeletal mechanisms we identify in coelomocytes contribute to the in vivo functioning of these cells. Several recent literature papers indicate that the subpopulation of coelomocytes historically referred to as "phagocytic amoebocytes" perform primitive immune functions including Natural Killer (NK) cell-like cytotoxic activity (Lin et al., 2001, J. Exp. Zool. 290:741) and he production and secretion of Complement factors (Gross et al., 2000, Immunogenetics 51:1034; Smith et al., 2001, Immunol. Rev. 180:16).

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: John Henson


Heidi Ann Murray (2003)

The role of the cytoskeleton in the cytotoxic functions of the sea urchin coelomocyte

My laboratory has employed sea urchin blood cells (called coelomocytes) as a model experimental system for the study of cell motility, a process that is medicated by a series of structural and motor proteins know collectively as the "cytoskeleton." A major long-term goal of this research is to understand the structural, functional and regulatory mechanisms underlying the cytoskeletal dynamics which help cell's mediate motility, shape changes an intracellular transport. A related goal is to determine how the cytoskeletal mechanisms we identify in coelomocytes contribute to the in vivo functioning of these cells. Several recent literature papers indicate that the subpopulation of coelomocytes historically referred to as "phagocytic amoebocytes" perform primitive immune functions including Natural Killer (NK) cell-like cytotoxic activity (Lin et al., 2001, J. Exp. Zool. 290:741) and he production and secretion of Complement factors (Gross et al., 2000, Immunogenetics 51:1034; Smith et al., 2001, Immunol. Rev. 180:16).

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: John Henson


Nicole Michelle Myers (2010)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Ronniel Nazarian (2000)

Mechanical and Pharmacological Manipulation of Actin-Based Centripetal Flow in Sea Urchin \

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: John Henson


Ronniel Nazarian (2000)

The Influence of Microtubules on Actin-based Retrograde Flow in Sea Urchin Coelomic Cells

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: John Henson


Minh Huu Nguyen (2011)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Johnathan Lee Nieves (2011)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Elizabeth Rasfeld Norris (2012)

NSF 0744261: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. The project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Genome-wide Analysis of Differential Gene Expression Modulated by Butyric Acid in HL-60 Cells

During the past year Dr. Michael Roberts mentored research student T. Scott Nowicki ('06) who trained in the laboratory of Dr. Jonathan Minden during the summer 2005. Mr. Nowicki assisted Sara Baszczewski in the Minden laboratory learning the DIGE proteomic analysis methods. This expertise was brought back to the Roberts laboratory at Dickinson and Nowicki investigated changes in human leukemia cells during differention using these proteomic methods during the 2005-06 academic year.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor:


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Genome-wide Analysis of Differential Gene Expression Modulated by Butyric Acid in HL-60 Cells

During the past year Dr. Michael Roberts mentored research student T. Scott Nowicki ('06) who trained in the laboratory of Dr. Jonathan Minden during the summer 2005. Mr. Nowicki assisted Sara Baszczewski in the Minden laboratory learning the DIGE proteomic analysis methods. This expertise was brought back to the Roberts laboratory at Dickinson and Nowicki investigated changes in human leukemia cells during differention using these proteomic methods during the 2005-06 academic year.

Term Funded:Fall 2005
Professor:


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Genome-wide Analysis of Differential Gene Expression Modulated by Butyric Acid in HL-60 Cells

During the past year Dr. Michael Roberts mentored research student T. Scott Nowicki ('06) who trained in the laboratory of Dr. Jonathan Minden during the summer 2005. Mr. Nowicki assisted Sara Baszczewski in the Minden laboratory learning the DIGE proteomic analysis methods. This expertise was brought back to the Roberts laboratory at Dickinson and Nowicki investigated changes in human leukemia cells during differention using these proteomic methods during the 2005-06 academic year.

Term Funded:Spring 2006
Professor:


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Differential Gene Expression in Butyric Acid-Induced Differentiation of Human Leukemia Cells

The Roberts laboratory is interested in understanding the molecular basis of cell differentiation and malignant transformation. To study these two distinct about interrelated events, we have chosen the human leukemia cell line, HL-60, as a model system. HL-60 cells are rapidly dividing, non-specialized cancer cells that can be induced to differentiate along normal myeloid lineages in culture. Previously, my laboratory has studied the phorbol ester-induced, macrophage differentiation pathway. Rapidly, after addition of the inducer, HL-60 cells exhibit properties of normal macrophage-like cells, exit the cell cycle and eventually undergo apoptosis. A cancer cell can literally be reverted into a "normal", non-dividing cell that ultimately self-destructs. Understanding the molecular events that mediate this dramatic reversion is the goal of our research. DNA Microarray Analysis has demonstrated changes in the global patterns of gene expression and it is this re-programming of the cell's genetics that underlies the process. Mr. Nowicki has explored another differentiation pathway, induced by butyric acid, that also leads to the reversion of HL-60 cells to a more normal cellular phenotype. Butyric acid is known to act as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases that cause changes in chromatin structure, which affect gene expression.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Michael Roberts


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Bioinformatics of Subcellular Localization and Changes due to Cancer

The main focus of recent experiments have been to generate computer-based comparisons of the subcellular localization patterns of GFP-tagged proteins in either normal or H-Ras-expressing NIH 3T3 cells. For this work GFP-tagged cell lines were transfected with H-Ras and then the control and Ras transformed lines examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Digital images of protein distribution patterns were analyzed by computer-based comparison programs and those proteins found to show significant changes were targeted for further examination. Dr. Henson's lab concentrated on the changes in localization of the tagged protein Tctex1 a light chain of the microtubule motor protein dynein.

Term Funded:Spring 2005
Professor: John Henson


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Differential Gene Expression in Butyric Acid-Induced Differentiation of Human Leukemia Cells

The Roberts laboratory is interested in understanding the molecular basis of cell differentiation and malignant transformation. To study these two distinct about interrelated events, we have chosen the human leukemia cell line, HL-60, as a model system. HL-60 cells are rapidly dividing, non-specialized cancer cells that can be induced to differentiate along normal myeloid lineages in culture. Previously, my laboratory has studied the phorbol ester-induced, macrophage differentiation pathway. Rapidly, after addition of the inducer, HL-60 cells exhibit properties of normal macrophage-like cells, exit the cell cycle and eventually undergo apoptosis. A cancer cell can literally be reverted into a "normal", non-dividing cell that ultimately self-destructs. Understanding the molecular events that mediate this dramatic reversion is the goal of our research. DNA Microarray Analysis has demonstrated changes in the global patterns of gene expression and it is this re-programming of the cell's genetics that underlies the process. Mr. Nowicki has explored another differentiation pathway, induced by butyric acid, that also leads to the reversion of HL-60 cells to a more normal cellular phenotype. Butyric acid is known to act as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases that cause changes in chromatin structure, which affect gene expression.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Michael Roberts


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Differential Gene Expression in Butyric Acid-Induced Differentiation of Human Leukemia Cells

The Roberts laboratory is interested in understanding the molecular basis of cell differentiation and malignant transformation. To study these two distinct about interrelated events, we have chosen the human leukemia cell line, HL-60, as a model system. HL-60 cells are rapidly dividing, non-specialized cancer cells that can be induced to differentiate along normal myeloid lineages in culture. Previously, my laboratory has studied the phorbol ester-induced, macrophage differentiation pathway. Rapidly, after addition of the inducer, HL-60 cells exhibit properties of normal macrophage-like cells, exit the cell cycle and eventually undergo apoptosis. A cancer cell can literally be reverted into a "normal", non-dividing cell that ultimately self-destructs. Understanding the molecular events that mediate this dramatic reversion is the goal of our research. DNA Microarray Analysis has demonstrated changes in the global patterns of gene expression and it is this re-programming of the cell's genetics that underlies the process. Mr. Nowicki has explored another differentiation pathway, induced by butyric acid, that also leads to the reversion of HL-60 cells to a more normal cellular phenotype. Butyric acid is known to act as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases that cause changes in chromatin structure, which affect gene expression.

Term Funded:Year 2006
Professor: Michael Roberts


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Bioinformatics of Subcellular Localization and Changes due to Cancer

The main focus of recent experiments have been to generate computer-based comparisons of the subcellular localization patterns of GFP-tagged proteins in either normal or H-Ras-expressing NIH 3T3 cells. For this work GFP-tagged cell lines were transfected with H-Ras and then the control and Ras transformed lines examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Digital images of protein distribution patterns were analyzed by computer-based comparison programs and those proteins found to show significant changes were targeted for further examination. Dr. Henson's lab concentrated on the changes in localization of the tagged protein Tctex1 a light chain of the microtubule motor protein dynein.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor:


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Differential Gene Expression in Butyric Acid-Induced Differentiation of Human Leukemia Cells

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Michael Roberts


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Differential Gene Expression in Butyric Acid-Induced Differentiation of Human Leukemia Cells

The Roberts laboratory is interested in understanding the molecular basis of cell differentiation and malignant transformation. To study these two distinct about interrelated events, we have chosen the human leukemia cell line, HL-60, as a model system. HL-60 cells are rapidly dividing, non-specialized cancer cells that can be induced to differentiate along normal myeloid lineages in culture. Previously, my laboratory has studied the phorbol ester-induced, macrophage differentiation pathway. Rapidly, after addition of the inducer, HL-60 cells exhibit properties of normal macrophage-like cells, exit the cell cycle and eventually undergo apoptosis. A cancer cell can literally be reverted into a "normal", non-dividing cell that ultimately self-destructs. Understanding the molecular events that mediate this dramatic reversion is the goal of our research. DNA Microarray Analysis has demonstrated changes in the global patterns of gene expression and it is this re-programming of the cell's genetics that underlies the process. Mr. Nowicki has explored another differentiation pathway, induced by butyric acid, that also leads to the reversion of HL-60 cells to a more normal cellular phenotype. Butyric acid is known to act as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases that cause changes in chromatin structure, which affect gene expression.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Michael Roberts


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Differential Gene Expression in Butyric Acid-Induced Differentiation of Human Leukemia Cells

The Roberts laboratory is interested in understanding the molecular basis of cell differentiation and malignant transformation. To study these two distinct about interrelated events, we have chosen the human leukemia cell line, HL-60, as a model system. HL-60 cells are rapidly dividing, non-specialized cancer cells that can be induced to differentiate along normal myeloid lineages in culture. Previously, my laboratory has studied the phorbol ester-induced, macrophage differentiation pathway. Rapidly, after addition of the inducer, HL-60 cells exhibit properties of normal macrophage-like cells, exit the cell cycle and eventually undergo apoptosis. A cancer cell can literally be reverted into a "normal", non-dividing cell that ultimately self-destructs. Understanding the molecular events that mediate this dramatic reversion is the goal of our research. DNA Microarray Analysis has demonstrated changes in the global patterns of gene expression and it is this re-programming of the cell's genetics that underlies the process. Mr. Nowicki has explored another differentiation pathway, induced by butyric acid, that also leads to the reversion of HL-60 cells to a more normal cellular phenotype. Butyric acid is known to act as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases that cause changes in chromatin structure, which affect gene expression.

Term Funded:Year 2006
Professor: Michael Roberts


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Differential Gene Expression in Butyric Acid-Induced Differentiation of Human Leukemia Cells

Term Funded:Year 2006
Professor: Michael Roberts


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Differential Gene Expression in Butyric Acid-Induced Differentiation of Human Leukemia Cells

The Roberts laboratory is interested in understanding the molecular basis of cell differentiation and malignant transformation. To study these two distinct about interrelated events, we have chosen the human leukemia cell line, HL-60, as a model system. HL-60 cells are rapidly dividing, non-specialized cancer cells that can be induced to differentiate along normal myeloid lineages in culture. Previously, my laboratory has studied the phorbol ester-induced, macrophage differentiation pathway. Rapidly, after addition of the inducer, HL-60 cells exhibit properties of normal macrophage-like cells, exit the cell cycle and eventually undergo apoptosis. A cancer cell can literally be reverted into a "normal", non-dividing cell that ultimately self-destructs. Understanding the molecular events that mediate this dramatic reversion is the goal of our research. DNA Microarray Analysis has demonstrated changes in the global patterns of gene expression and it is this re-programming of the cell's genetics that underlies the process. Mr. Nowicki has explored another differentiation pathway, induced by butyric acid, that also leads to the reversion of HL-60 cells to a more normal cellular phenotype. Butyric acid is known to act as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases that cause changes in chromatin structure, which affect gene expression.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Michael Roberts


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Bioinformatics of Subcellular Localization and Changes due to Cancer

The main focus of recent experiments have been to generate computer-based comparisons of the subcellular localization patterns of GFP-tagged proteins in either normal or H-Ras-expressing NIH 3T3 cells. For this work GFP-tagged cell lines were transfected with H-Ras and then the control and Ras transformed lines examined using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Digital images of protein distribution patterns were analyzed by computer-based comparison programs and those proteins found to show significant changes were targeted for further examination. Dr. Henson's lab concentrated on the changes in localization of the tagged protein Tctex1 a light chain of the microtubule motor protein dynein.

Term Funded:Fall 2004
Professor: John Henson


Theodore Scott Nowicki (2006)

Differential Gene Expression in Butyric Acid-Induced Differentiation of Human Leukemia Cells

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Michael Roberts


Caitlyn Rose Nuger (2009)

NSF 0744261 RUI: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. The project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors n the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:Spring 2009
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Michael Joseph O'Malley (2005)

The role of a´1 specific opioid agonist in improving neurological outcome following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

Whole body cooling and brain metabolic depression increase survival time following ischemic brain injury. Recent molecular and integrative pharmacology research suggests that numerous vertebrates produce ´1-specific opioid agonists within their central nervous systems in response to severe environmental stressors. These opioids seemingly confer protection by lowering brain metabolic demand and thus increasing tolerance to reduced blood delivery states. We will test the hypothesis that the administration of a´1-specific opioid agonists within their central nervous systems in response to severe environmental stressors. These opioids seemingly confer protection by lowering brain metabolic demand and thus increasing tolerance to reduced blood delivery states. We will test the hypothesis that the administration of a ´1-specific opioid agonist, as a resuscitation adjuvant, will improve neurological recovery following nine minutes of cardiac arrest. We expect to find significant improvement in neurological outcome in animals receiving the opioid and that this will be mediated by decreases in metabolic demand and body core temperature.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Michael Joseph O'Malley (2005)

The role of a´1 specific opioid agonist in improving neurological outcome following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

Whole body cooling and brain metabolic depression increase survival time following ischemic brain injury. Recent molecular and integrative pharmacology research suggests that numerous vertebrates produce ´1-specific opioid agonists within their central nervous systems in response to severe environmental stressors. These opioids seemingly confer protection by lowering brain metabolic demand and thus increasing tolerance to reduced blood delivery states. We will test the hypothesis that the administration of a´1-specific opioid agonists within their central nervous systems in response to severe environmental stressors. These opioids seemingly confer protection by lowering brain metabolic demand and thus increasing tolerance to reduced blood delivery states. We will test the hypothesis that the administration of a ´1-specific opioid agonist, as a resuscitation adjuvant, will improve neurological recovery following nine minutes of cardiac arrest. We expect to find significant improvement in neurological outcome in animals receiving the opioid and that this will be mediated by decreases in metabolic demand and body core temperature.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Blake Thomas O'Shaughnessy (2006)

Heart S.C.O.R.E.

This Western Pennsylvania-based study will (1) improve cardiovascular risk stratification to identify high risk populations, (2) identify disparities in cardiovascular risk based on race, socioeconomic status, and geographic location, (3) evaluate mechanisms for populations difference in cardiovascular risk, and (4) implement a multi-disciplinary community-based intervention program (includes exercise, nutrition, smoking cessation, and behavioral interventions) to decrease cardiovascular risk in high-risk populations. These goals, which are designed to eliminate ethnic and racial health disparities, are closely tied to the National Initiative to Eliminate Racial and Ethnic Disparities in Health and the nation's health promotion and disease prevention agenda established in Healthy People 2010.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor:


Phoebe Ford Oldach (2013)

Genomics in The Differentiation of HL60 Cells

Term Funded:Fall 2011
Professor: Michael Roberts


Ruth Mary Oldham (2006)

NSF 0336717 Collaborative Research: Coordinate Induction of Sink Strength and Polyphenol Metabolism in Trees

Carbohydrates and secondary metabolism of forest trees, tomato

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Tom Arnold


Davia Marie Palmeri (2009)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

Under a previous award the PIs discovered that young, heterotrophic poplar leaves must import carbon resources to be able to respond to insects or jasmonate elicitation with increased phenolic defense synthesis. Increased import, or "Induced Sink Strength" (ISS), determines leaf responsiveness, and helps explain why some leaves are more "inducible" than others and why plant defenses are spatially and temporally heterogenous. This project would examine the generality of ISS by studying two additional plant species whose inducible defenses differ from those in poplar: alkaloids in tomato and glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Young (sink) leaves will be elicted by wounding + oral secretions from insects that stimulate defenses; changes in defense production, carbon and nitrogen import (using stable isotopes), and cell wall invertase then will be assessed. Transport will be blocked with non-damaging steam girdling in some plants to demonstrate the requirement for importation in induced defenses. In addition to alkaloids and glucosinolates in tomato and Arabidopsis, the dependence on ISS of induction of protein defenses (chitinases, polyphenoloxidases, peroxidases, proteinase inhibitors) will be examined in these species and poplar. Previous results suggested that competing sinks may alter leaf responses to elicitation by hampering material or signal transport. A series of experiments is proposed with combinations of the 3 study plants in which the number, size, proximity of and damage to potentially competing sinks (lateral branches, nearby leaves, fruits) is manipulated and the impact on the responsiveness of young target leaves is assessed. The ability of one herbivore to block or enhance responses to a second by feeding nearby on competing or cooperating sinks will be examined. These studies include both correlative m

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Tom Arnold


Davia Marie Palmeri (2009)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

Under a previous award the PIs discovered that young, heterotrophic poplar leaves must import carbon resources to be able to respond to insects or jasmonate elicitation with increased phenolic defense synthesis. Increased import, or "Induced Sink Strength" (ISS), determines leaf responsiveness, and helps explain why some leaves are more "inducible" than others and why plant defenses are spatially and temporally heterogenous. This project would examine the generality of ISS by studying two additional plant species whose inducible defenses differ from those in poplar: alkaloids in tomato and glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Young (sink) leaves will be elicted by wounding + oral secretions from insects that stimulate defenses; changes in defense production, carbon and nitrogen import (using stable isotopes), and cell wall invertase then will be assessed. Transport will be blocked with non-damaging steam girdling in some plants to demonstrate the requirement for importation in induced defenses. In addition to alkaloids and glucosinolates in tomato and Arabidopsis, the dependence on ISS of induction of protein defenses (chitinases, polyphenoloxidases, peroxidases, proteinase inhibitors) will be examined in these species and poplar. Previous results suggested that competing sinks may alter leaf responses to elicitation by hampering material or signal transport. A series of experiments is proposed with combinations of the 3 study plants in which the number, size, proximity of and damage to potentially competing sinks (lateral branches, nearby leaves, fruits) is manipulated and the impact on the responsiveness of young target leaves is assessed. The ability of one herbivore to block or enhance responses to a second by feeding nearby on competing or cooperating sinks will be examined. These studies include both correlative m

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: Tom Arnold


Davia Marie Palmeri (2009)

NSF 0614893 Collaborative Research: Competing Sinks as Constraints on Plant Defense Responses

Under a previous award the PIs discovered that young, heterotrophic poplar leaves must import carbon resources to be able to respond to insects or jasmonate elicitation with increased phenolic defense synthesis. Increased import, or "Induced Sink Strength" (ISS), determines leaf responsiveness, and helps explain why some leaves are more "inducible" than others and why plant defenses are spatially and temporally heterogenous. This project would examine the generality of ISS by studying two additional plant species whose inducible defenses differ from those in poplar: alkaloids in tomato and glucosinolates in Arabidopsis thaliana. Young (sink) leaves will be elicted by wounding + oral secretions from insects that stimulate defenses; changes in defense production, carbon and nitrogen import (using stable isotopes), and cell wall invertase then will be assessed. Transport will be blocked with non-damaging steam girdling in some plants to demonstrate the requirement for importation in induced defenses. In addition to alkaloids and glucosinolates in tomato and Arabidopsis, the dependence on ISS of induction of protein defenses (chitinases, polyphenoloxidases, peroxidases, proteinase inhibitors) will be examined in these species and poplar. Previous results suggested that competing sinks may alter leaf responses to elicitation by hampering material or signal transport. A series of experiments is proposed with combinations of the 3 study plants in which the number, size, proximity of and damage to potentially competing sinks (lateral branches, nearby leaves, fruits) is manipulated and the impact on the responsiveness of young target leaves is assessed. The ability of one herbivore to block or enhance responses to a second by feeding nearby on competing or cooperating sinks will be examined. These studies include both correlative m

Term Funded:Fall 2007
Professor: Tom Arnold


Linda Anne Mathew Panicker (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Fall 2008
Professor: David Kushner


Linda Anne Mathew Panicker (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Spring 2009
Professor: David Kushner


Linda Anne Mathew Panicker (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: David Kushner


Rebecca Lyn Patterson (2013)

Investigation of Actin Nucleation Factors and Cytoskeletal Structure in Mouse Melanoma Cells

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: John Henson


Laura Ann Pell (2004)

Radiotelemetry Study of Summer Movements in Allegheny Woodrat (Neotoma magister) Populations

The allegheny woodrat is a native mammal designated as threatened or endangered in all the states of its range in the northeastern US. Our previous studies suggest that its long-term existence may depend on effective dispersal between habitat patches, but so far there are no measurements of when, and how far, woodrats are capable of dispersing. I propose to use Whitaker funds to include a student collaborator in a radiotelemetry study already funded by the Pennsylvania Wild Resource Conservation Fund. My student collaborator and I will live-trap and radiocollar up to 12 woodrats in a local population and then will monitor their position during June and July. In a follow-up session, I will repeat the monitoring for three weeks in August-September. The data from this study, in conjunction with a parallel effort by collaborator Dr. John Peles of Penn State McKeesport, will allow us to quantify the density of woodrats on and around their primary rock outcrop habitat, their likelihood of shifting den sites, and the timing and distance of dispersal of juvenile woodrats, all key pieces of information for modeling the future of this species and for developing a general model for biodiversity of patchily distributed small mammals in Pennsylvania.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Janet Wright


Cheryl Jane Pendergrass (2000)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 2000
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Jacob Richard Penniman (2003)

Neural Control of Metamorphosis in a Gastropod Mollusc

This proposal seeks funding for Jacob Penniman '03 to work at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories for 8 weeks in the summer of 2002. He will investigate the neural control of metamorphosis in larvae of gastropod molluscs under the supervision of Prof. Anthony Pires. This project, currently funded by the National Science Foundation, uses electrophysiological, neurochemical and anatomical methods to study how the nervous system directs rapid and radical developmental changes in immature animals. While at Friday Harbor, Penniman and Pires will interact with a vigorous international community of scientists. In addition to working on Pires' NSF-funded project (see attached summary), Penniman and Pires will also pursue collaborations in progress with Dr. Michael G. Hadfield (University of Hawaii), Dr. Shaun Cain (University of Washington), and Dr. Stephen C. Kempf (Auburn University) on various aspects of neurochemistry, development and behavior of marine invertebrates.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor:


Jacob Richard Penniman (2003)

Neural Control of Metamorphosis in a Gastropod Mollusc

This proposal seeks funding for Jacob Penniman '03 to work at the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories for 8 weeks in the summer of 2002. He will investigate the neural control of metamorphosis in larvae of gastropod molluscs under the supervision of Prof. Anthony Pires. This project, currently funded by the National Science Foundation, uses electrophysiological, neurochemical and anatomical methods to study how the nervous system directs rapid and radical developmental changes in immature animals. While at Friday Harbor, Penniman and Pires will interact with a vigorous international community of scientists. In addition to working on Pires' NSF-funded project (see attached summary), Penniman and Pires will also pursue collaborations in progress with Dr. Michael G. Hadfield (University of Hawaii), Dr. Shaun Cain (University of Washington), and Dr. Stephen C. Kempf (Auburn University) on various aspects of neurochemistry, development and behavior of marine invertebrates.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Tony Pires


Jacob Richard Penniman (2003)

NSF 0110832 RUI: Neural Regulation of Metamorphosis in a Gastropod Mollusc

Development of many types of animals is marked by a dramatic structural transformation, or metamorphosis, between larval and adult forms. Although metamorphosis is gradual and driven by hormones in well-studied developmental systems such as frogs and fruit flies, in other animals it is sudden, rapid, and driven by the larval nervous system. This is especially true in the marine environment, where metamorphosis is triggered by a chemical signal associated with food or habitat required by the adult form. The role of the nervous system in the control of such metamorphoses is poorly understood and has been the focus of Prof. Pires' research for the last decade. Working with larvae of gastropod molluscs (snails), he has shown that one family of chemical signals within the nervous system, the catecholamines, are important regulators of metamorphosis. It is now important to determine if this is a general feature of gastropod metamorphosis or is peculiar to certain species. Differences between species can be considered "experiments of nature" to clarify neurochemical control mechanisms in metamorphosis. Pilot experiments last summer revealed surprising diversity among species, in responses to pharmacological manipulation of endogenous catecholamines. This summer Prof. Pires hopes to see if this diversity can be related to quantitative differences in catecholamine content, or qualitative differences in the distribution of catecholamine-containing cells in larval nervous systems. This project will bring a student into the dynamic research environment of the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories, a world-class center for research in neural and developmental marine biology.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Tony Pires


Jacob Richard Penniman (2003)

NSF 0110832 RUI: Neural Regulation of Metamorphosis in a Gastropod Mollusc

Development of many types of animals is marked by a dramatic structural transformation, or metamorphosis, between larval and adult forms. Although metamorphosis is gradual and driven by hormones in well-studied developmental systems such as frogs and fruit flies, in other animals it is sudden, rapid, and driven by the larval nervous system. This is especially true in the marine environment, where metamorphosis is triggered by a chemical signal associated with food or habitat required by the adult form. The role of the nervous system in the control of such metamorphoses is poorly understood and has been the focus of Prof. Pires' research for the last decade. Working with larvae of gastropod molluscs (snails), he has shown that one family of chemical signals within the nervous system, the catecholamines, are important regulators of metamorphosis. It is now important to determine if this is a general feature of gastropod metamorphosis or is peculiar to certain species. Differences between species can be considered "experiments of nature" to clarify neurochemical control mechanisms in metamorphosis. Pilot experiments last summer revealed surprising diversity among species, in responses to pharmacological manipulation of endogenous catecholamines. This summer Prof. Pires hopes to see if this diversity can be related to quantitative differences in catecholamine content, or qualitative differences in the distribution of catecholamine-containing cells in larval nervous systems. This project will bring a student into the dynamic research environment of the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories, a world-class center for research in neural and developmental marine biology.

Term Funded:Fall 2003
Professor: Tony Pires


Jacob Richard Penniman (2003)

NSF 0110832 RUI: Neural Regulation of Metamorphosis in a Gastropod Mollusc

Development of many types of animals is marked by a dramatic structural transformation, or metamorphosis, between larval and adult forms. Although metamorphosis is gradual and driven by hormones in well-studied developmental systems such as frogs and fruit flies, in other animals it is sudden, rapid, and driven by the larval nervous system. This is especially true in the marine environment, where metamorphosis is triggered by a chemical signal associated with food or habitat required by the adult form. The role of the nervous system in the control of such metamorphoses is poorly understood and has been the focus of Prof. Pires' research for the last decade. Working with larvae of gastropod molluscs (snails), he has shown that one family of chemical signals within the nervous system, the catecholamines, are important regulators of metamorphosis. It is now important to determine if this is a general feature of gastropod metamorphosis or is peculiar to certain species. Differences between species can be considered "experiments of nature" to clarify neurochemical control mechanisms in metamorphosis. Pilot experiments last summer revealed surprising diversity among species, in responses to pharmacological manipulation of endogenous catecholamines. This summer Prof. Pires hopes to see if this diversity can be related to quantitative differences in catecholamine content, or qualitative differences in the distribution of catecholamine-containing cells in larval nervous systems. This project will bring a student into the dynamic research environment of the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories, a world-class center for research in neural and developmental marine biology.

Term Funded:Spring 2003
Professor: Tony Pires


Nadine Marie Powell (2004)

The role of a´1 specific opioid agonist in improving neurological outcome following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

Whole body cooling and brain metabolic depression increase survival time following ischemic brain injury. Recent molecular and integrative pharmacology research suggests that numerous vertebrates produce ´1-specific opioid agonists within their central nervous systems in response to severe environmental stressors. These opioids seemingly confer protection by lowering brain metabolic demand and thus increasing tolerance to reduced blood delivery states. We will test the hypothesis that the administration of a´1-specific opioid agonists within their central nervous systems in response to severe environmental stressors. These opioids seemingly confer protection by lowering brain metabolic demand and thus increasing tolerance to reduced blood delivery states. We will test the hypothesis that the administration of a ´1-specific opioid agonist, as a resuscitation adjuvant, will improve neurological recovery following nine minutes of cardiac arrest. We expect to find significant improvement in neurological outcome in animals receiving the opioid and that this will be mediated by decreases in metabolic demand and body core temperature.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Nadine Marie Powell (2004)

The role of a´1 specific opioid agonist in improving neurological outcome following resuscitation from cardiac arrest

Whole body cooling and brain metabolic depression increase survival time following ischemic brain injury. Recent molecular and integrative pharmacology research suggests that numerous vertebrates produce ´1-specific opioid agonists within their central nervous systems in response to severe environmental stressors. These opioids seemingly confer protection by lowering brain metabolic demand and thus increasing tolerance to reduced blood delivery states. We will test the hypothesis that the administration of a´1-specific opioid agonists within their central nervous systems in response to severe environmental stressors. These opioids seemingly confer protection by lowering brain metabolic demand and thus increasing tolerance to reduced blood delivery states. We will test the hypothesis that the administration of a ´1-specific opioid agonist, as a resuscitation adjuvant, will improve neurological recovery following nine minutes of cardiac arrest. We expect to find significant improvement in neurological outcome in animals receiving the opioid and that this will be mediated by decreases in metabolic demand and body core temperature.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Matthew Francis Pye (2006)

NSF 0336717 Collaborative Research: Coordinate Induction of Sink Strength and Polyphenol Metabolism in Trees

Carbohydrates and secondary metabolism of forest trees

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Tom Arnold


Matthew Francis Pye (2006)

Enhancing the Efficacy of bioherbicides

There are many plant pathogens that will attack weeds, but only a few have proven virulent enough to control invasive weed species and compete with chemical herbicides. In nature, there is strong selection against highly virulent pathogens, as survival of the pathogen depends upon survival of the host. Total eradication of the host would be evolutionary suicide. However, this deficiency of kamikaze agents does not imply that effective biocontrol is beyond our means. Rather, it challenges biocontrol researchers to develop innovative strategies using formulation, genetics, and synergy to enhance the effectiveness of their biocontrol pathogens. It has been discovered that the virulence and efficacy of bioberbicides can be greatly enhanced by selecting variants of the weed pathogen that overproduce and excrete amino acids that are inhibitory to the target plant. If funded, I plan to continue Professor David Sands work with enhancing the efficacy of bioherbicides.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor:


John L Pyott (1996)

Cell Regulation of Gene Expression

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Michael Roberts


Amanda Cynthia Reynolds (2002)

Neurochemical Diversity in Gastropod Metamorphosis

Development of many types of animals is marked by a dramatic structural transformation, or metamorphosis, between larval and adult forms. Although metamorphosis is gradual and driven by hormones in well-studied developmental systems such as frogs and fruit flies, in other animals it is sudden, rapid, and driven by the larval nervous system. This is especially true in the marine environment, where metamorphosis is triggered by a chemical signal associated with food or habitat required by the adult form. The role of the nervous system in the control of such metamorphoses is poorly understood and has been the focus of Prof. Pires' research for the last decade. Working with larvae of gastropod molluscs (snails), he has shown that one family of chemical signals within the nervous system, the catecholamines, are important regulators of metamorphosis. It is now important to determine if this is a general feature of gastropod metamorphosis or is peculiar to certain species. Differences between species can be considered "experiments of nature" to clarify neurochemical control mechanisms in metamorphosis. Pilot experiments last summer revealed surprising diversity among species, in responses to pharmacological manipulation of endogenous catecholamines. This summer Prof. Pires hopes to see if this diversity can be related to quantitative differences in catecholamine content, or qualitative differences in the distribution of catecholamine-containing cells in larval nervous systems. This project will bring a student into the dynamic research environment of the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories, a world-class center for research in neural and developmental marine biology.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Tony Pires


Amanda Cynthia Reynolds (2002)

NSF 0110832 RUI: Neural Regulation of Metamorphosis in a Gastropod Mollusc

Development of many types of animals is marked by a dramatic structural transformation, or metamorphosis, between larval and adult forms. Although metamorphosis is gradual and driven by hormones in well-studied developmental systems such as frogs and fruit flies, in other animals it is sudden, rapid, and driven by the larval nervous system. This is especially true in the marine environment, where metamorphosis is triggered by a chemical signal associated with food or habitat required by the adult form. The role of the nervous system in the control of such metamorphoses is poorly understood and has been the focus of Prof. Pires' research for the last decade. Working with larvae of gastropod molluscs (snails), he has shown that one family of chemical signals within the nervous system, the catecholamines, are important regulators of metamorphosis. It is now important to determine if this is a general feature of gastropod metamorphosis or is peculiar to certain species. Differences between species can be considered "experiments of nature" to clarify neurochemical control mechanisms in metamorphosis. Pilot experiments last summer revealed surprising diversity among species, in responses to pharmacological manipulation of endogenous catecholamines. This summer Prof. Pires hopes to see if this diversity can be related to quantitative differences in catecholamine content, or qualitative differences in the distribution of catecholamine-containing cells in larval nervous systems. This project will bring a student into the dynamic research environment of the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories, a world-class center for research in neural and developmental marine biology.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Tony Pires


Amanda Cynthia Reynolds (2002)

NSF 0110832 RUI: Neural Regulation of Metamorphosis in a Gastropod Mollusc

Development of many types of animals is marked by a dramatic structural transformation, or metamorphosis, between larval and adult forms. Although metamorphosis is gradual and driven by hormones in well-studied developmental systems such as frogs and fruit flies, in other animals it is sudden, rapid, and driven by the larval nervous system. This is especially true in the marine environment, where metamorphosis is triggered by a chemical signal associated with food or habitat required by the adult form. The role of the nervous system in the control of such metamorphoses is poorly understood and has been the focus of Prof. Pires' research for the last decade. Working with larvae of gastropod molluscs (snails), he has shown that one family of chemical signals within the nervous system, the catecholamines, are important regulators of metamorphosis. It is now important to determine if this is a general feature of gastropod metamorphosis or is peculiar to certain species. Differences between species can be considered "experiments of nature" to clarify neurochemical control mechanisms in metamorphosis. Pilot experiments last summer revealed surprising diversity among species, in responses to pharmacological manipulation of endogenous catecholamines. This summer Prof. Pires hopes to see if this diversity can be related to quantitative differences in catecholamine content, or qualitative differences in the distribution of catecholamine-containing cells in larval nervous systems. This project will bring a student into the dynamic research environment of the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories, a world-class center for research in neural and developmental marine biology.

Term Funded:Spring 2002
Professor: Tony Pires


Emily Elizabeth Rhode (2004)

NSF 0336716 RUI Collaborative Research: Mechanisms of induced pathogen resistance in seagrasses

Nutrient enrichment and seagrass phenolic metabolism

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Tom Arnold


Courtney Lynn Ritchie (2001)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 2001
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Courtney Lynn Ritchie (2001)

Neurophysiological Analysis of Metamorphosis in a Gastropod Mollusc

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Tony Pires


Jacey Ann Roberts (2003)

A DNA Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression during Human Cell Differentiation

The human leukemia cell line HL-60 can be induced to differentiate into macrophage-like cells. This transformation from a rapidly dividing, cancer cell into a non-dividing "normal" cell is the result of a re-programming of the cell's genetic machinery. DNA microarray analysis allows for the global inspection of gene expression in cells at various times. These experiments will identify genes that are activated, repressed or unchanged during the differentiation process.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Michael Roberts


Jacey Ann Roberts (2003)

A DNA Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression during Human Cell Differentiation

The human leukemia cell line HL-60 can be induced to differentiate into macrophage-like cells. This transformation from a rapidly dividing, cancer cell into a non-dividing "normal" cell is the result of a re-programming of the cell's genetic machinery. DNA microarray analysis allows for the global inspection of gene expression in cells at various times. These experiments will identify genes that are activated, repressed or unchanged during the differentiation process.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Michael Roberts


Anita Diana Lee Robin (2012)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Mary Alles Robinson (2001)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 2000
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Norah Elizabeth Roderick (2005)

NSF 0336717 Collaborative Research: Coordinate Induction of Sink Strength and Polyphenol Metabolism in Trees

Carbohydrates and secondary metabolism of forest trees, tomato

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Tom Arnold


Megan Samantha Rosenberg (2013)

Physiological Performance of Snakes During Constriction

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: Scott Boback


Patrick James Rowsey (1990)

Biology of Barnacles on genus Octolasmis Epizoic on Crustacea in the Gulf of Mexico

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1988
Professor: William Jeffries


Christian Charles William Ruhl (2014)

Mechanisms of CD14 Expression

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: Tiffany Frey


Michael John Sakatos (1998)

Experimental Recolonization of Woodrats (Neotoma Magister) at an Extirpated Site)

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: Janet Wright


Michael David Salvatore (2003)

Ecology, demography, and recovery of a rare wildflower Euphorbia Purpurea

Long-term studies that students and I have carried out on Pennsylvania populations of glade spurge, Euphorbia purpurea, indicate that this globally rare and scientifically interesting wildflower is declining locally. Sexual reproduction is necessary for the maintenance of the population size. However, seedlings are rare and survival of young plants is poor, even after five or six years of growth. This summer I hope to 1) continue long-term monitoring at all five sites, 2) assess the effects of new deer fences and removal of competing vegetation on performance of the plants at three locations, 3) complete initial location of plants in two more recently located populations, with particular attention to small plants such as seedlings that may have been overlooked, 4) experiment to determine the best conditions for rearing seedlings, and 5) work up certain portions of our long-term data set that have remained unanalyzed until now because of time constraints.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Carol Loeffler


Jennifer Ann Sanders (1999)

NIH-Roberts

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: Michael Roberts


Laura Sappelsa (1990)

An Investigation of the Synthesis and Metabolism of Hydrogen Peroxide in Higher Plants

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1988
Professor: Thomas Brennan


Laura Sappelsa (1990)

An Investigation of the Synthesis and Metabolism of Hydrogen Peroxide in Higher Plants

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1989
Professor: Thomas Brennan


Andrew Robert Sas (2003)

NSF 0110832 RUI: Neural Regulation of Metamorphosis in a Gastropod Mollusc

Development of many types of animals is marked by a dramatic structural transformation, or metamorphosis, between larval and adult forms. Although metamorphosis is gradual and driven by hormones in well-studied developmental systems such as frogs and fruit flies, in other animals it is sudden, rapid, and driven by the larval nervous system. This is especially true in the marine environment, where metamorphosis is triggered by a chemical signal associated with food or habitat required by the adult form. The role of the nervous system in the control of such metamorphoses is poorly understood and has been the focus of Prof. Pires' research for the last decade. Working with larvae of gastropod molluscs (snails), he has shown that one family of chemical signals within the nervous system, the catecholamines, are important regulators of metamorphosis. It is now important to determine if this is a general feature of gastropod metamorphosis or is peculiar to certain species. Differences between species can be considered "experiments of nature" to clarify neurochemical control mechanisms in metamorphosis. Pilot experiments last summer revealed surprising diversity among species, in responses to pharmacological manipulation of endogenous catecholamines. This summer Prof. Pires hopes to see if this diversity can be related to quantitative differences in catecholamine content, or qualitative differences in the distribution of catecholamine-containing cells in larval nervous systems. This project will bring a student into the dynamic research environment of the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories, a world-class center for research in neural and developmental marine biology.

Term Funded:Spring 2003
Professor: Tony Pires


Lauren Carel Saunders (2010)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Katrina Louise Schulberg (2001)

Actin-Based Retrograde Flow in Sea Urchin Coelomocytes: Development of a Permeabilized Cell Model

The mechanisms underlying how cells move and change shape have puzzled cell biologists for over a hundred years. Although a great deal of detailed molecular knowledge has been generated, many fundamental questions remain unanswered. My lab employs cells isolated from the coelomic fluid of sea urchins (coelomocytes) as an experimental system for studying an aspect of cell motility termed retrograde flow. This process consists of the centripetal movement of the cell surface membrane and underlying protein scaffold (the cytoskeleton) from the cell periphery to the center. The sea urchin coelomocyte has a number of attributes, including ease of isolation, geometry, and optical clarity, which makes it an excellent system for studying this form of motility. However the types of experiments that can be performed with these cells has been limited by the fact that they are not amenable to microinjection. In this proposal we plan to develop a permeabilized cell model of the coelomocyte. In order to do this my students and I will have to test a wide array of permeabilizing agents (detergents and membrane toxins) as well as intracellular buffers. Permeabilized cell models have been instrumental in studying a number of cellular processes including cell division, secretion and intracellular transport. The development of the coelomocyte permeabilized model will allow for us to use membrane impermeant reagents (fluorescent proteins, function blocking antibodies, toxins, etc.) as tools in experiments aimed at gaining a better understanding of the mechanisms mediating the flow process.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: John Henson


Katrina Louise Schulberg (2001)

NIH 1R15GM60925-01 Mechanism and Regulation of Actin-based Retrograde Flow

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: John Henson


Nicholas Milan Schwab (2014)

Ecological and Environmental Influences on Nest-Site Selection of the Painted Turtle

In Painted turtles, the temperature of the nest determines the gender of the hatchlings: warm temps result in female hatchlings while cooler temps result in male hatchlings. As a result, painted turtles are susceptible to climate change. We aim to understand how increases in average daily temperature may affect how females choose suitable sites to lay their eggs and whether these nests are successful in producing hatchlings. In this study, we investigate the patterns of nest-site selection in a local population of Painted turtles in an attempt to discover the interaction between local (roads, railroad tracks, buildings) and global (climate change) anthropogenic factors in determining the behavior of turtles and the survival of their offspring. By recording and analyzing basic parameters such as temperature, location, and exposure we will begin to understand how organisms respond to changes in temperature and therefore the biological consequences of global climate change.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Scott Boback


Heather Blumberg Schwartzbauer (1991)

Construction of Recombinant Strains of Aspergillus Nidulans

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1990
Professor: Craig Jurgensen


Abir Adnan Senz (2004)

Glucocorticoid Receptor Fundtion in a Conditionally Immortalized Hippocampal Cell Line

Glucocorticoid hormones exert wide-ranging effects in nearly all tissues in the body and act through a soluble receptor protein, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). Although widely distributed throughout the brain, the GR is particularly enriched in the hippocampus where it appears to mediate many of the actions of glucocorticoid hormones in central control of stress responses. In recent years, there has been considerable interest in understanding the roles of glucocorticoid hormones in prenatal development, particularly as it relates to the effects of prenatal stress. As a model for assessing the function of GRs in developing hippocampus we will use the HiB-5 hippocampal cell line. HiB-5 cells were derived from the infection of embryonic rat hippocampal neurons with a temperature-sensitive Simian Virus 40 (SV40). Due to the temperature sensitive properties of the transforming SV40 virus, the HiB-5 cells have become conditionally immortalized. In other words, these cells grow continuously when cultured at 33ºC, the permissive temperature of the SV40 virus, and do not express a neuronal phenotype under these conditions However, when shifted to the restrictive temperature of 39ºC, which inactivates the transforming and immortalizing functions of the SV40 virus, the HiB-5 cells undergo a form of differentiation that culminates in their growth arrest, extension of long neuronal processes and expression of various neuronal markers. We plan to study GR function in immortalized and undifferentiated HiB-5 cells (i.e. grown at 33ºC) and in differentiated HiB-5 cells (i.e. grown at 39ºC). In particular, we will use Western blot analysis to study the turnover of GR and various transfection assays to study the transcriptional regulatory properties of the receptor. The ultimate goal of the project will be to establish conditions%

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor:


Kristen Eileen Severi (2004)

NSF 0110832 RUI: Neural Regulation of Metamorphosis in a Gastropod Mollusc

Development of many types of animals is marked by a dramatic structural transformation, or metamorphosis, between larval and adult forms. Although metamorphosis is gradual and driven by hormones in well-studied developmental systems such as frogs and fruit flies, in other animals it is sudden, rapid, and driven by the larval nervous system. This is especially true in the marine environment, where metamorphosis is triggered by a chemical signal associated with food or habitat required by the adult form. The role of the nervous system in the control of such metamorphoses is poorly understood and has been the focus of Prof. Pires' research for the last decade. Working with larvae of gastropod molluscs (snails), he has shown that one family of chemical signals within the nervous system, the catecholamines, are important regulators of metamorphosis. It is now important to determine if this is a general feature of gastropod metamorphosis or is peculiar to certain species. Differences between species can be considered "experiments of nature" to clarify neurochemical control mechanisms in metamorphosis. Pilot experiments last summer revealed surprising diversity among species, in responses to pharmacological manipulation of endogenous catecholamines. This summer Prof. Pires hopes to see if this diversity can be related to quantitative differences in catecholamine content, or qualitative differences in the distribution of catecholamine-containing cells in larval nervous systems. This project will bring a student into the dynamic research environment of the University of Washington's Friday Harbor Laboratories, a world-class center for research in neural and developmental marine biology.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Tony Pires


Scott Adam Sheeder (1997)

Experimental Recolonization of Woodrats (Neotoma Magister) at an Extirpated Site)

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: Janet Wright


James L Shoemaker (1997)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 1998
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Stephanie Eckenrode Shreiner (1996)

Second-year study of population ecology of the rare glade spurge Euphorbia Purpurea

Euphorbia purpurea or glade spurge is a rare swamp wildflower still known to exist at only about 30 sites, from North Carolina to Pennsylvania. Over the last seven years we have monitored populations at three of the six PA sites: at Lambs Gap in Perry Co., at Mt. Holly Marsh Preserve, and at Hunters Run (map on next page). Whitaker students and I conducted surveys of two additional PA sites (Goat Hill and Cowans Gap) in 1999 and 2000, in conjunction with State Parks and Bureau of Forestry personnel and with Nature Conservancy botanists. Because both populations appear to have declined alarmingly, we worked with these groups to erect fences to exclude deer at both sites and have obtained permission to intensify our population monitoring and our attempts to rear seedlings from these two sites. This summer I hope to 1) continue long-term monitoring at all five sites, 2) conduct a thorough search to locate additional plants that we think exist at Goat Hill, 3) obtain and analyze soil samples from all five sites to help us better understand the species' requirements, and 4) experiment to determine the best conditions for rearing seedlings, not only of this species but of two rare goldenrod species. We have begun using our long-term data set to document effects of deer on the plants, and I would like to expand the data analysis this year to assess the effects of early senescence in some plants on their growth and reproduction in the following season.

Term Funded:Summer 1995
Professor: Carol Loeffler


Stephanie Eckenrode Shreiner (1996)

Second-year study of population ecology of the rare glade spurge Euphorbia Purpurea

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1995
Professor: Carol Loeffler


James W Sierotko (2004)

Population and propagation studies of three rare wildflowers, Euphorbia purpurea, Solidago speciosa, and Aster radula

Over the last nine years, students and I have been monitoring populations of several rare wildflower species and investigating various aspects of their reproduction in hopes of 1) gaining a thorough understanding of their population ecology, and the ecology of rare plants in general, which is poorly studied, and 2) devising management plans which can ensure the continued existence of these species. Our strategy with our most studied species, glade spurge (Euphorbia purpurea), has been to determine through monitoring if these plants' populations are stable, increasing, or declining, and to use measurement, careful observation, and where possible experimental manipulations to identify the factors that affect their reproduction and survival. This summer, we hope to continue monitoring five Pennsylvania populations of glade spurge with special attention to the relative reproductive success and survival of plants given protection from deer and plant competition in the last one to five years. We will initiate some new analyses of the impact of deer browsing on plant size and reproduction that will add important refinements to our previous analyses. We also want to continue ongoing searches for new populations of glade spurge and to initiate searches for two other species, showy goldenrod (Solidago speciosa) and rough-leaved aster (Aster radula). Finally, in the laboratory, we would like to study the effects of fertilization and watering treatments on the early growth of glade spurge and showy goldenrod, and we are planning a germination experiment that should refine our understanding of cold dormancy in showy goldenrod seeds.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Carol Loeffler


Jessica Kristine Sinchi (2014)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Emily Elizabeth Souder (2005)

Induction of HAART-Persistent HIV-1 Expression

We are trying to solve the problem of HIV-1 latency. HIV-1 latency is defined as those viruses, in individuals infected with the AIDS virus that are "dormant" and persist in patient cells despite their use of anti-viral medications, collectively referred to as HAART. We are investigating novel compounds such as prostratin that are able to force the latent viruses to emerge from cells so that the immune system will recognize these infected cells and eliminate them or eradicate them. The use of compounds to force the expression of latent virus is called immune activation therapy or IAT. I will be treating cells of patients on HAART that retain latent virus with compounds such as prostratin to get virus produced from the treated cells. I will also be isolating and characterizing the virus to try to determine why they remain latent as also to determine if the compounds are able to force the release of only some or many of the latent viruses that remain in patient's cells despite their use of HAART.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor:


Natalie Mary Stanley (2013)

Mathematical Techniques for the Analysis of Human Leukemia

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Michael Roberts


Natalie Mary Stanley (2013)

NASA GCCE Grant: Ecological and Environmental Influences on Nest Site Selection in the Painted Turtle

Ecological and Environmental Influences on Nest Site Selection in the Painted Turtle

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Scott Boback


Natalie Mary Stanley (2013)

Molecular Analysis of Human Leukemia

Term Funded:Fall 2011
Professor: Michael Roberts


Cory Michael Staub (1999)

NIH-Roberts

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Michael Roberts


Cory Michael Staub (1999)

The Role of AP-1 in Macrophage Differentiation of HL-60 Cells

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Michael Roberts


Danielle Leigh Staunton (2013)

Ecological and environmental influences on nest-site selection in the Painted turtle

In contrast to most vertebrates which possess sex chromosomes, the gender of many reptile species is determined by the temperature experienced during the middle third of embryonic development. Painted turtles exhibit this strategy known as temperature-dependent sex determination (TSD); warm temperatures produce females, cool temps produce males, and intermediate temps produce both sexes. As average global temperatures increase over the next decade, an increasing number of female Painted turtles may be produced unless females adjust nest parameters to reduce their internal temperatures. In this study, we investigate the patterns of nest-site selection in a local population of Painted turtles in an attempt to discover the influence of local (roads, railroad tracks, buildings) and global (climate change) anthropogenic factors on the plasticity of this behavior. By recording and analyzing these variables, we will begin to understand how organisms respond to changes in temperature and therefore the biological consequences of global climate change.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Scott Boback


Mary Caitlin Strahota (2008)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Suleiman Yousef Sudah (2015)

Ventilatory Changes in Male and Female Mice in Response to Whole Animal Exposure to Carbon Dioxide

My lab recently discovered a sex difference in the activation of the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN) in mice in response to 5% crbon dioxide (CO2). There are more than three times as many RTN cells that respond to 5% C2 in males than in females. Our data are intriguing given that the RTN regulates breathing in response to changes in blood carbon dioxide and is defective in several conditions that disproportionately affect males, including the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The proposed study will address an important follow-up question: do females increase their breathing in response to 5% C2 even though the RTN isn't activated? We will collect ventilatory data and correlate numbers of CO2-activated RTN cells with changes in ventilation in mice of each sex. These data will further our understanding of the sex difference in the mouse RTN and also may explain why females are less susceptible to SIDS.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Missy Niblock


Katelyn Maria Swade (2015)

Mechanisms of CD14 Expression

CD14 is an immune system cellular receptor that plays a critical role in host defense against invading pathogens. It binds primarily to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of the outer wall of Gram-negative bacteria. CD14 is found as two protein isoforms: a membrane protein (mCD14) and a soluble serum protein (sCD14). Aberrant expression of sCD14 has been associated with a number of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, a deeper mechanistic understanding of CD14 expression and release from the cell is critical to understand its contribution to inflammatory diseases. Previous work has shown that treatment of immune cells with lovastatin, a drug primarily prescribed for cardiovascular disease that has anti-inflammatory properties, increases the expression of mCD14 while decreasing the release of sCD14 following LPS stimulation. Since lovastatin modulates CD14 expression, this project aims to use this drug as a tool to uncover novel mechanisms of this process.

Term Funded:summer 2013
Professor: Tiffany Frey


Amelia Linger Szabat (2013)

Molecular Analysis of Human Leukemia

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: Michael Roberts


Holleh Fatima Tajalli (2012)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Zafar Subhani Tariq (1999)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 1999
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Jason William Tarpley (1999)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 1999
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Jason William Tarpley (1999)

Electrophysiological Study of Metamorphosis in Gastropod Molluscs

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: Tony Pires


Natalie Rizzo Taylor (2000)

Merck Scholars Program: Students engage in integrative physiology, anatomy and microanatomy training and research on-campus;and participate in summer internships at Merck Research Labs, Rahway, NJ

This cooperative agreement has provided funds for the development of a world class physiology research and teaching facility at Dickinson while also providing for the on-site training (at MRL) of three highly qualified undergraduates per year. Additionally, the program provided all students taking physiology, anatomy and microanatomy with an unsurpassed experience with instrumentation they would normally not encounter until graduate or medical school.

Term Funded:Year 2000
Professor: Chuck Zwemer


Christopher Aristos Theodorou (2013)

Biomechanics of Ventilation in Boa Constrictor

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Scott Boback


Jason Christopher Theriault (1995)

The Function of Kinesin in Organelle Movements in Sea Urchin Cells

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: John Henson


Elizabeth Carney Thorsteinson (2009)

Characterization of Central Chemoreceptors in the Mouse Cerebellum

The goals of this project are to identify and characterize chemosensitive cells in the mouse cerebellum. These specialized neurons, called central chemoreceptors, are able to sense changes in blood levels of carbon dioxide and respond to those changes by increasing breathing. A defect in central chemoreception is thought to be one of the causes of the sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). The proposed experiments will take advantage of a unique transgenic mouse model that allows cells activated by exposure of the whole animal to carbon dioxide to be identified and characterized in tissue sections of the post-mortem brain. This project uses an entirely novel approach to identify and characterize central chemoreceptors in the cerebellum. Knowledge of the number, location, and morphology of these important cells in the mouse not only will further our understanding of central chemoreceptor neuroanatomy, but also will lay the groundwork necessary for future studies to take advantage of the numerous transgenic mouse models specifically suited for studying SIDS.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Mary Niblock


Benjamin James Tiede (2005)

Antibody Isolation and Characterization

This project will be in the Antibody Phage Display Group at Centocor Pharmaceuticals, one of the leaders in monoclonal antibody drug development. Previous research on the development of monoclonal antbodies has been done with the use of hybridomas and screening for particular properties. The Phage Display Group is able to use bacterial systems to develop the antibodies of choice rather than screening fro particular antibodies. A specific property of an antibody will be chosen and then antibodies with this property will be isolated. Antibodies in this experiment will be amplified, cloned and purified and sequenced to study their properties.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor:


Benjamin James Tiede (2005)

Host gene expression induced by the brome mosaic virus la protein

By studying virus-host interactions one can learn how viruses manipulate host-cell machinery to propogate their genetic material, yet also gain a better understanding of biological processes within cells. Positive-strand RNA viruses include many pathogens such as hepatitis C virus, West Nile virus, and the SARS coronavirus. Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a mild plant pathogen, is a representative positive-strand RNA virus whose life cycle processes have been reproduced in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast is a powerful genetic system and is currently the organism of choice for whole genome studies (genomics). This study will use microarray technology to identify yeast (host) genes that are expressed, and therefore may contribute to, establishment of the membrane-associated complex within the yeast cell where viral genome replication occurs. Such results may indicate anti-viral targets but will also complement previous work that identified over one hundred yeast genes with roles in BMV RNA replication.

Term Funded:Winter 2004
Professor: David Kushner


Benjamin James Tiede (2005)

Host Gene Expression Induced by the Brome Mosaic

By studying virus-host interactions one can learn how viruses manipulate host-cell machinery to propagate their genetic material, yet also gain a better understanding of biological processes within cells. Positive-strand RNA viruses include many pathogens such as hepatitis C virus, West Nile virus, and the SARS coronavirus. Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a mild plant pathogen, is a representative positive-strand RNA virus whose life cycle processes have been reproduced in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast is a powerful genetic system and is currently the organism of choice for whole genome studies (genomics). This study will use microarray technology to identify yeast (host) genes that are expressed, and therefore may contribute to, establishment of the membrane-associated complex within the yeast cell where viral genome replication occurs. Such results may indicate anti-viral targets but will also complement previous work that identified over one hundred yeast genes with roles in BMV RNA replication.

Term Funded:Winter 2005
Professor: David Kushner


Benjamin James Tiede (2005)

Host gene expression induced by the brome mosaic virus la protein

By studying virus-host interactions one can learn how viruses manipulate host-cell machinery to propogate their genetic material, yet also gain a better understanding of biological processes within cells. Positive-strand RNA viruses include many pathogens such as hepatitis C virus, West Nile virus, and the SARS coronavirus. Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a mild plant pathogen, is a representative positive-strand RNA virus whose life cycle processes have been reproduced in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast is a powerful genetic system and is currently the organism of choice for whole genome studies (genomics). This study will use microarray technology to identify yeast (host) genes that are expressed, and therefore may contribute to, establishment of the membrane-associated complex within the yeast cell where viral genome replication occurs. Such results may indicate anti-viral targets but will also complement previous work that identified over one hundred yeast genes with roles in BMV RNA replication.

Term Funded:Winter 2004
Professor: David Kushner


Benjamin James Tiede (2005)

Host Gene Expression Induced by the Brome Mosaic

By studying virus-host interactions one can learn how viruses manipulate host-cell machinery to propagate their genetic material, yet also gain a better understanding of biological processes within cells. Positive-strand RNA viruses include many pathogens such as hepatitis C virus, West Nile virus, and the SARS coronavirus. Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a mild plant pathogen, is a representative positive-strand RNA virus whose life cycle processes have been reproduced in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast is a powerful genetic system and is currently the organism of choice for whole genome studies (genomics). This study will use microarray technology to identify yeast (host) genes that are expressed, and therefore may contribute to, establishment of the membrane-associated complex within the yeast cell where viral genome replication occurs. Such results may indicate anti-viral targets but will also complement previous work that identified over one hundred yeast genes with roles in BMV RNA replication.

Term Funded:Winter 2005
Professor: David Kushner


Valerie Anne Trabosh (2003)

Molecular Mechanism of Actin-based Retrograde Flow in Sea Urchin Ceolomocytes

Cell motility, which plays a fundamental role in a number of crucial cell processes including migration, cell division, and secretion, is mediated by a host of motor and structural proteins know collectively as "the cytoskeleton." In this proposal we plan to extend our studies on the cytoskeletal mechanisms underlying a specific form of motility termed retrograde flow. This flow process involves the movement of the cell's membrane and underlying cytoskeletal scaffold from the cell periphery towards the cell center and it is present in the majority of nucleated cells. The sea urchin coelomocyte offers a number of distinct advantages as a model experimental system for studying retrograde flow, including ease of isolation, lack of cytoskeletal complexity and optical clarity. We plan to use coelomocytes combined with pharmacological treatments, digitally-enhanced video microscopy, and immunofluorescent localization microscopy to extend our understanding of the molecular mechanisms which mediate retrograde flow.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: John Henson


Valerie Anne Trabosh (2003)

Molecular Mechanism of Actin-based Retrograde Flow in Sea Urchin Ceolomocytes

Cell motility, which plays a fundamental role in a number of crucial cell processes including migration, cell division, and secretion, is mediated by a host of motor and structural proteins know collectively as "the cytoskeleton." In this proposal we plan to extend our studies on the cytoskeletal mechanisms underlying a specific form of motility termed retrograde flow. This flow process involves the movement of the cell's membrane and underlying cytoskeletal scaffold from the cell periphery towards the cell center and it is present in the majority of nucleated cells. The sea urchin coelomocyte offers a number of distinct advantages as a model experimental system for studying retrograde flow, including ease of isolation, lack of cytoskeletal complexity and optical clarity. We plan to use coelomocytes combined with pharmacological treatments, digitally-enhanced video microscopy, and immunofluorescent localization microscopy to extend our understanding of the molecular mechanisms which mediate retrograde flow.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: John Henson


Valerie Anne Trabosh (2003)

Molecular Mechanisms of Muscular Dystrophy

During the 2002 summer, I would be working in Dr. Yiumo Chan's laboratory at the Weis Center for Research in Danville, PA. The projects that I would be involved in would focus on the molecular mechanisms of muscular dystrophy, specifically the structure and function of the proteins mutated in the disease. These proteins, which are commonly called the dystrophin-associated protein complex (DAPC), are thought to play an important role in maintaining muscle membrane integrity by providing "a physical connection between the actin cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix." (Chan) Mutated sarcoglycans, transmembrane proteins, are responsible for certain cases of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Sarcoglycans stabilize the DAPC connection between the actin cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix. During the summer, we would also be looking at the role of sarcoglycans in signal transduction and their role in maintaining the integrity of the muscle membrane. Using cultured myotubes, the role of post-translational modifications in the transport and assembly of the sarcoglycans to the muscle membrane would be investigated. From the molecular perspective, we would be looking for novel genes involved in muscular dystrophy as well as the role of sarcoglycans.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor:


Robin Jill Turin (1993)

Genetic Structure of Allegheny Woodchucks

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1990
Professor: Janet Wright


Courtney Jean Ullrich (2001)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Michael Roberts


Andrew Jacobovitz Veselka (2015)

NSF 085670 STEP Program at Dickinson College

Through this program, Dickinson intends to recruit and matriculate a "science posse" cohort in each of three years beginning in the fall of 2009. The science posse program will have three major components: 1) a four-week summer pre-matriculation program in which students will participate in lab research and a series of enrichment workshops in chemistry and mathematics; 2) a second eight-week summer of research with Dickinson faculty members using our successful model of student/faculty research; and 3) a capstone eight-week summer research experience at off-campus laboratories in major research universities. The program will provide a strong mentoring experience for underrepresented students to support their pursuit of a science major. The successful implementation of this plan will result in the establishment of a cohort of science major role models for future students among our underrepresented minority groups. Results of the program will be disseminated widely within the broader scientific education community so that they may serve as a model for other institutions.

Term Funded:summer 2012
Professor: David Kushner


Meagen Kathleen Voss (2007)

NIH 1R15GM60925-02 Mechanism and Regulation of Actin-based Retrograde Flow

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: John Henson


Heather Grace Ward (2002)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Michael Roberts


Matthew Julius Weddig (2013)

Scalloped Expression During Larval Development

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Richard Matthew Weeks (2013)

NASA GCCE Grant: Impact of Near Future Climate Change Scenarios on Sea Urchin Embryogenesis

Impact of Near Future Climate Change Scenarios on Sea Urchin Embryogenesis

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: John Henson


Brett Cameron Wegner (1999)

Optimization of Gene Transfer into Human Myeloid Cell Lines by Electroporation

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: Michael Roberts


Brett Cameron Wegner (1999)

Population Ecology of Euphorbia Purpurea (Glade Spurge), a Rare Plant Species

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Carol Loeffler


Eleonore P Werner (2006)

DNA Microarray Analysis of Retinoic Acid-Induced Granulocyte Differentiation of Human Leukemia Cells

The human promyelocytic cell line, HL-60, can be induced to differentiate in culture into several different white blood cell types. Retinoic acid is an inducer that directs differentiation along the granulocyte pathway. Rapidly dividing HL-60 leukemia cells take on granulocyte structure and function and stop dividing as they are genetically reprogrammed by the signalling system that is activated by the inducer. These changes in genetic program are not well understood but the system is amenable to DNA microarray analysis which is capable of elucidating changes in the expression of thousands of genes in a single experiment. This study proposes to utilize microarray technology and bioinformatics tools to define the new genetic program that transforms cancer cells into non-dividing granulocytes.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Michael Roberts


Eleonore P Werner (2006)

DNA Microarray Analysis of Retinoic Acid-Induced Granulocyte Differentiation of Human Leukemia Cells

The human promyelocytic cell line, HL-60, can be induced to differentiate in culture into several different white blood cell types. Retinoic acid is an inducer that directs differentiation along the granulocyte pathway. Rapidly dividing HL-60 leukemia cells take on granulocyte structure and function and stop dividing as they are genetically reprogrammed by the signalling system that is activated by the inducer. These changes in genetic program are not well understood but the system is amenable to DNA microarray analysis which is capable of elucidating changes in the expression of thousands of genes in a single experiment. This study proposes to utilize microarray technology and bioinformatics tools to define the new genetic program that transforms cancer cells into non-dividing granulocytes.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Michael Roberts


Max Evan Widawski (2014)

NSF 0918624: Collaborative Research/RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3' portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5' portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny ( )-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:summer 2013
Professor: David Kushner


Lindsay Michelle Wieland (2004)

Isolation of Subpopulation of in a Woodrat (Neotoma Magister) Metapopulation

The Allegheny woodrat is a native mammal designated as threatened or endangered in all the states of its range in the northeastern US. Our previous studies suggest that its long-term existence may depend on effective dispersal between habitat patches, and that without such recolonization small population units would decline to extinction, so determining the degree of isolation of population units is important. Our most recent data implicate young males as the most likely dispersers between units. To test this proposal and as part of a continuing investigation of woodrat dispersal, my student collaborator and I will live-trap and radiocollar up to 8 woodrats in a local population and then will monitor their position from spring through summer (8 weeks for student). In a related study, we will collect tissue samples and initiate a genetic analysis with microsatellite markers to quantify population isolation along the current eastern edge of the woodrat's diminishing range.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Janet Wright


Kevin Andrew Wood (2011)

Population Ecology of Central Pennsylvania Snake Communities

Snakes are secretive animals and under most circumstances are not readily observed in the field. This is particularly true of smaller species that spend most of their time under leaf litter or underground. Consequently little is known about the basic biology of these snakes despite the fact that they are an important component of mixed hardwood forest ecosystems in Pennsylvania. This project aims to determine population and life-history parameters for Pennsylvania snake communities at the Reineman Wildlife Sanctuary and the Dickinson College Farm using artificial shelters that facilitate their detection. In spring 2009 we established three coverboard arrays in forest and grassland habitats at the two sites. Data from summer 2009 indicates that these boards are effective in attracting snakes. In this proposal I am seeking support for one Dickinson student to monitor the snake communities in these habitats.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Scott Boback


Daniel Allerton Wright (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Fall 2006
Professor: David Kushner


Daniel Allerton Wright (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Fall 2006
Professor: David Kushner


Daniel Allerton Wright (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Spring 2007
Professor: David Kushner


Daniel Allerton Wright (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Fall 2007
Professor: David Kushner


Daniel Allerton Wright (2009)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: David Kushner


Jacob Clifton Wright (2005)

Population and propagation studies of three rare wildflowers, Euphorbia purpurea, Solidago speciosa, and Aster radula

Over the last nine years, students and I have been monitoring populations of several rare wildflower species and investigating various aspects of their reproduction in hopes of 1) gaining a thorough understanding of their population ecology, and the ecology of rare plants in general, which is poorly studied, and 2) devising management plans which can ensure the continued existence of these species. Our strategy with our most studied species, glade spurge (Euphorbia purpurea), has been to determine through monitoring if these plants' populations are stable, increasing, or declining, and to use measurement, careful observation, and where possible experimental manipulations to identify the factors that affect their reproduction and survival. This summer, we hope to continue monitoring five Pennsylvania populations of glade spurge with special attention to the relative reproductive success and survival of plants given protection from deer and plant competition in the last one to five years. We will initiate some new analyses of the impact of deer browsing on plant size and reproduction that will add important refinements to our previous analyses. We also want to continue ongoing searches for new populations of glade spurge and to initiate searches for two other species, showy goldenrod (Solidago speciosa) and rough-leaved aster (Aster radula). Finally, in the laboratory, we would like to study the effects of fertilization and watering treatments on the early growth of glade spurge and showy goldenrod, and we are planning a germination experiment that should refine our understanding of cold dormancy in showy goldenrod seeds.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Carol Loeffler


Jacob Clifton Wright (2005)

Population ecology and management of rare plant species, especially Euphorbia purpurea, glade spurge

The ecology of long-lived, slowly-reproducing wildflowers is poorly understood, because of the scarcity of long-term studies. We will census five populations of a globally rare wildflower, glade spurge (Euphorbia purpurea), in a multi-year attempt to understand why these populations are declining. This year we will evaluate the light environment and soil conditions near plants that have grown to large size over the last several years, versus conditions around plants that have grown smaller. The light measurements will help us to assess how shading by trees and lower vegetation affects glade spurge growth and to develop management recommendations for the Game Commission and other agencies overseeing the sites. We will also continue experiments to evaluate the effects of deer browsing on glade spurge growth and reproduction. To develop appreciation of plant species differences, we will also briefly investigate two other rare species of wildflowers.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Carol Loeffler


Sarah E Yeskel (2005)

Assessment of Cenomic Instability in Breast Cancer Patients

In this study, I will be putting together the early data for The Breast Cancer Genomic Instability project for a grant proposal. It will involve chart review, abstraction and exploratory analysis on the case and control subjects gathered thus far. The study, involving 275 women, deals with collecting information about health, diet, and exposure history of these women and collecting blood for DNA and tumor tissue. We will be studying the organization of the demographic, health history, and tumor characteristic data on these subjects. I will also be involved in interim data analysis that will need to be completed by the end of the summer, for the grant proposal due in the early fall. This will be wonderful research experience for me, as I will be studying in a UNC oncology laboratory examining DNA repair genes and functional assays of DNA stability and repair to determine whether the ability to repair DNA predisposes women to breast cancer.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor:


Mesrob Yeterian (2014)

The Mechanism of Motility at the Cell Edge

The cytoskeleton is the system of structural and motor proteins that mediates a wide range of crucial cellular processes, including cell division, migration, immune defense and adhesion. My laboratory has long used the sea urchin coelomocyte as a model experimental system for the study of the cytoskeletal basis of cellular movement and process/protrusion formation. In the past we have used structural and pharmacological approaches to infer the mechanisms underlying motility, however our studies have been hindered by the lack of specificity of the drugs we have used. This summer we plan to employ two newly discovered and highly specific small molecule inhibitors of the actin cytoskeleton along with RNA interference-based approaches. These new tools will allow us to address a significant current debate in the field about the relative contributions of two regualtory proteins that help mediate actin cytoskeletal structure and dynamics at the cell edge. We are confident that this new research will help corroborate and extend our previous work and contribute important new insights into the molecular basis for cell movement.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: John Henson


Rachel A Yonker (2011)

NSF 0744261: Transcriptional control of neural differentiation in drosophila

A research aim of the project is to characterize the expression patterns of biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system. Biogenic amine receptors are in a class of G-protein coupled receptors that function in communication via neurotransmitters in the central nervous system. The project for the summer was to characterize the nine members of our "short list" of putative or published biogenic amine receptors in the Drosophila embryonic central nervous system.

Term Funded:Spring 2011
Professor: Kirsten Guss


Ashley Serwah Young (2014)

NSF 0918624 RUI: Identification of cis-acting sequence and structural elements required for replication of a viral RNA

This grant provides funds for Professor Kushner to conduct a collaborative research project in conjunction with Professor Anne Simon of the University of Maryland. Identification and characterization of all structure-function relationships in non-coding sequences required for replication of an infectious RNA is a fundamental question in virology. However, many viral RNAs are simply too large in size to be used to generate such a functional map. The 356 nucleotide subviral RNA of Turnip crinkle virus known as satC is one of the smallest known infectious agents and therefore is highly suited for sequence-structure-function studies. Furthermore, satC sequence-structure-function relationships can be studied using a novel approach termed in vivo functional selection, in which an evolution-based approach allows for functional satC to be selected from an initial pool where specific regions of this viral RNA have been differentially randomized. This has allowed for detailed characterization of the 3´ portion of satC. This project aims to use in vivo functional selection to begin to characterize the 5´ portion of satC, specifically examining sequences and structures that regulate synthesis of progeny (+)-sense viral RNA from (-)-sense replication intermediates. A critical element of this project is that the experiments will be initiated during semester-long experiments in the PI's RNA biology (Bio 419) courses in Spring 2010 and Spring 2012, in order to expand opportunities for student-faculty research.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: David Kushner


Songhui Zhao (2013)

Sensory Regulation of Metamorphosis

Term Funded:
Professor: Anthony Pires


Biology, Mathematics & Computer Science

Christina Elizabeth Baum (2014)

The transcription factor PRDM8 and its target gene EOMES are up-regulated in human leukemia cells induced to differentiate by PMA

Acute myeloid leukemia is diagnosed in 20,600 adults and children per year in the United States and is the most commonly diagnosed type of leukemia. HL-60 cells were used in this experiment as modeling system for AML because they constitutively divide without maturing. The cells were induced to differentiate into macrophages through treatment with PMA, ultimately leading to apoptosis within 24 hours. By analyzing the cDNA with qRT-PCR at various time points after exposure to PMA, the expression of two genes, PRDM8 and EOMES, was observed. PRDM8 is a transcription factor, which regulates the expression of its downstream effector, EOMES. It was found that both genes are up regulated, with EOMES peaking at an earlier time point than PRDM8. BLAST sequence searching was then used to find the binding site sequence in the promoter region of EOMES, the target gene of PRDM8. This research may be useful in understanding cell signaling pathways that cause the maturation and apoptosis of cells in relation to AML.

Term Funded:
Professor:


David Charles Bittner (2011)

NSF 0827262 UBM: Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The project involves the linkage of a course in Biology, The Biology of Cancer, and a course in Mathematics, Mathematical Techniques in the Biological Sciences. A cohort of 6-10 students from these programs will co-enroll in the courses in the spring semester of their Junior Year. The instructors to maximize areas of intersection and complementation will carefully coordinate the courses. The Biology of Cancer will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling networks involved in malignant transformation, with a strong emphasis on the experimental approaches to cancer study. Mathematical Techniques in the Biological sciences will survey biostatistical methods with a focus on network modeling. The project mentors will meet with the student cohort throughout the semester to further underscore the course connections and begin developing research questions that exploit the genomic approaches used to understand cancer coupled with the mathematical tools used to analyze large datasets and construct mathematical models. The students will form teams of 2-4 student researchers who will return to campus for an eight-week summer research experience. The projects will all utilized the human leukemia cell line, HL-60. HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate in culture into one of several non-dividing specialized myeloid cell types. Differentiation results in the conversion of cells exhibiting a cancer cell phenotype to a normal cell phenotype through genetic reprogramming mediated by changes in gene expression. These changes will be monitored over time using DNA microarray analysis and the mathematical approaches for analyzing these data, including normalization, tests of significance and clustering will be employed. As data are obtained, students will begin modeling the expression responses in the context of signaling networks. These models w

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Michael Roberts


Sarah Elisabeth Brnich (2011)

NSF 0827262 UBM: Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The project involves the linkage of a course in Biology, The Biology of Cancer, and a course in Mathematics, Mathematical Techniques in the Biological Sciences. A cohort of 6-10 students from these programs will co-enroll in the courses in the spring semester of their Junior Year. The instructors to maximize areas of intersection and complementation will carefully coordinate the courses. The Biology of Cancer will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling networks involved in malignant transformation, with a strong emphasis on the experimental approaches to cancer study. Mathematical Techniques in the Biological sciences will survey biostatistical methods with a focus on network modeling. The project mentors will meet with the student cohort throughout the semester to further underscore the course connections and begin developing research questions that exploit the genomic approaches used to understand cancer coupled with the mathematical tools used to analyze large datasets and construct mathematical models. The students will form teams of 2-4 student researchers who will return to campus for an eight-week summer research experience. The projects will all utilized the human leukemia cell line, HL-60. HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate in culture into one of several non-dividing specialized myeloid cell types. Differentiation results in the conversion of cells exhibiting a cancer cell phenotype to a normal cell phenotype through genetic reprogramming mediated by changes in gene expression. These changes will be monitored over time using DNA microarray analysis and the mathematical approaches for analyzing these data, including normalization, tests of significance and clustering will be employed. As data are obtained, students will begin modeling the expression responses in the context of signaling networks. These models w

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Michael Roberts


Amy Louise Conner (2010)

NSF 0827262 UBM: Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The project involves the linkage of a course in Biology, The Biology of Cancer, and a course in Mathematics, Mathematical Techniques in the Biological Sciences. A cohort of 6-10 students from these programs will co-enroll in the courses in the spring semester of their Junior Year. The instructors to maximize areas of intersection and complementation will carefully coordinate the courses. The Biology of Cancer will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling networks involved in malignant transformation, with a strong emphasis on the experimental approaches to cancer study. Mathematical Techniques in the Biological sciences will survey biostatistical methods with a focus on network modeling. The project mentors will meet with the student cohort throughout the semester to further underscore the course connections and begin developing research questions that exploit the genomic approaches used to understand cancer coupled with the mathematical tools used to analyze large datasets and construct mathematical models. The students will form teams of 2-4 student researchers who will return to campus for an eight-week summer research experience. The projects will all utilized the human leukemia cell line, HL-60. HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate in culture into one of several non-dividing specialized myeloid cell types. Differentiation results in the conversion of cells exhibiting a cancer cell phenotype to a normal cell phenotype through genetic reprogramming mediated by changes in gene expression. These changes will be monitored over time using DNA microarray analysis and the mathematical approaches for analyzing these data, including normalization, tests of significance and clustering will be employed. As data are obtained, students will begin modeling the expression responses in the context of signaling networks. These models w

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Michael Roberts


Amy Louise Conner (2010)

Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The research project will address the question: What are the molecular differences between human leukemia cells and differentiated human blood cells? Profs. Roberts and Forrester will direct the team of 6 students in research combining molecular biological and computational methods to elucidate the differences between the "cancer" genetic program and the "normal cell" genetic program utilizing the human leukemia cell line HL-60. Changes in genetic programs will be determined using DNA microarray analysis as the leukemia cells are induced to assume normal cell properties in culture. A variety of bioinformatics tools will then be applied to the large data sets generated to uncover the molecular mechanisms in play and to model and predict changes in gene activity that mediate the cancer to normal cell conversion. The ultimate goal of this project is to more fully understand the genetic differences between normal and cancer cells and, in the process, identify new targets for chemotherapy.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Jeffrey Forrester


Bryan William Conner (2011)

NSF 0827262 UBM: Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The project involves the linkage of a course in Biology, The Biology of Cancer, and a course in Mathematics, Mathematical Techniques in the Biological Sciences. A cohort of 6-10 students from these programs will co-enroll in the courses in the spring semester of their Junior Year. The instructors to maximize areas of intersection and complementation will carefully coordinate the courses. The Biology of Cancer will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling networks involved in malignant transformation, with a strong emphasis on the experimental approaches to cancer study. Mathematical Techniques in the Biological sciences will survey biostatistical methods with a focus on network modeling. The project mentors will meet with the student cohort throughout the semester to further underscore the course connections and begin developing research questions that exploit the genomic approaches used to understand cancer coupled with the mathematical tools used to analyze large datasets and construct mathematical models. The students will form teams of 2-4 student researchers who will return to campus for an eight-week summer research experience. The projects will all utilized the human leukemia cell line, HL-60. HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate in culture into one of several non-dividing specialized myeloid cell types. Differentiation results in the conversion of cells exhibiting a cancer cell phenotype to a normal cell phenotype through genetic reprogramming mediated by changes in gene expression. These changes will be monitored over time using DNA microarray analysis and the mathematical approaches for analyzing these data, including normalization, tests of significance and clustering will be employed. As data are obtained, students will begin modeling the expression responses in the context of signaling networks. These models w

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Michael Roberts


Carla Elise Cox (2011)

NSF 0827262 UBM: Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The project involves the linkage of a course in Biology, The Biology of Cancer, and a course in Mathematics, Mathematical Techniques in the Biological Sciences. A cohort of 6-10 students from these programs will co-enroll in the courses in the spring semester of their Junior Year. The instructors to maximize areas of intersection and complementation will carefully coordinate the courses. The Biology of Cancer will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling networks involved in malignant transformation, with a strong emphasis on the experimental approaches to cancer study. Mathematical Techniques in the Biological sciences will survey biostatistical methods with a focus on network modeling. The project mentors will meet with the student cohort throughout the semester to further underscore the course connections and begin developing research questions that exploit the genomic approaches used to understand cancer coupled with the mathematical tools used to analyze large datasets and construct mathematical models. The students will form teams of 2-4 student researchers who will return to campus for an eight-week summer research experience. The projects will all utilized the human leukemia cell line, HL-60. HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate in culture into one of several non-dividing specialized myeloid cell types. Differentiation results in the conversion of cells exhibiting a cancer cell phenotype to a normal cell phenotype through genetic reprogramming mediated by changes in gene expression. These changes will be monitored over time using DNA microarray analysis and the mathematical approaches for analyzing these data, including normalization, tests of significance and clustering will be employed. As data are obtained, students will begin modeling the expression responses in the context of signaling networks. These models w

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Michael Roberts


Ryan David Deeds (2010)

NSF 0827262 UBM: Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The project involves the linkage of a course in Biology, The Biology of Cancer, and a course in Mathematics, Mathematical Techniques in the Biological Sciences. A cohort of 6-10 students from these programs will co-enroll in the courses in the spring semester of their Junior Year. The instructors to maximize areas of intersection and complementation will carefully coordinate the courses. The Biology of Cancer will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling networks involved in malignant transformation, with a strong emphasis on the experimental approaches to cancer study. Mathematical Techniques in the Biological sciences will survey biostatistical methods with a focus on network modeling. The project mentors will meet with the student cohort throughout the semester to further underscore the course connections and begin developing research questions that exploit the genomic approaches used to understand cancer coupled with the mathematical tools used to analyze large datasets and construct mathematical models. The students will form teams of 2-4 student researchers who will return to campus for an eight-week summer research experience. The projects will all utilized the human leukemia cell line, HL-60. HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate in culture into one of several non-dividing specialized myeloid cell types. Differentiation results in the conversion of cells exhibiting a cancer cell phenotype to a normal cell phenotype through genetic reprogramming mediated by changes in gene expression. These changes will be monitored over time using DNA microarray analysis and the mathematical approaches for analyzing these data, including normalization, tests of significance and clustering will be employed. As data are obtained, students will begin modeling the expression responses in the context of signaling networks. These models w

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Michael Roberts


Ryan David Deeds (2010)

Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The research project will address the question: What are the molecular differences between human leukemia cells and differentiated human blood cells? Profs. Roberts and Forrester will direct the team of 6 students in research combining molecular biological and computational methods to elucidate the differences between the "cancer" genetic program and the "normal cell" genetic program utilizing the human leukemia cell line HL-60. Changes in genetic programs will be determined using DNA microarray analysis as the leukemia cells are induced to assume normal cell properties in culture. A variety of bioinformatics tools will then be applied to the large data sets generated to uncover the molecular mechanisms in play and to model and predict changes in gene activity that mediate the cancer to normal cell conversion. The ultimate goal of this project is to more fully understand the genetic differences between normal and cancer cells and, in the process, identify new targets for chemotherapy.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Jeffrey Forrester


Julia Elizabeth Filiberti (2012)

NSF 0827262 UBM: Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The project involves the linkage of a course in Biology, The Biology of Cancer, and a course in Mathematics, Mathematical Techniques in the Biological Sciences. A cohort of 6-10 students from these programs will co-enroll in the courses in the spring semester of their Junior Year. The instructors to maximize areas of intersection and complementation will carefully coordinate the courses. The Biology of Cancer will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling networks involved in malignant transformation, with a strong emphasis on the experimental approaches to cancer study. Mathematical Techniques in the Biological sciences will survey biostatistical methods with a focus on network modeling. The project mentors will meet with the student cohort throughout the semester to further underscore the course connections and begin developing research questions that exploit the genomic approaches used to understand cancer coupled with the mathematical tools used to analyze large datasets and construct mathematical models. The students will form teams of 2-4 student researchers who will return to campus for an eight-week summer research experience. The projects will all utilized the human leukemia cell line, HL-60. HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate in culture into one of several non-dividing specialized myeloid cell types. Differentiation results in the conversion of cells exhibiting a cancer cell phenotype to a normal cell phenotype through genetic reprogramming mediated by changes in gene expression. These changes will be monitored over time using DNA microarray analysis and the mathematical approaches for analyzing these data, including normalization, tests of significance and clustering will be employed. As data are obtained, students will begin modeling the expression responses in the context of signaling networks. These models w

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Michael Roberts


Michael Jude Grant (2011)

NSF 0827262 UBM: Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The project involves the linkage of a course in Biology, The Biology of Cancer, and a course in Mathematics, Mathematical Techniques in the Biological Sciences. A cohort of 6-10 students from these programs will co-enroll in the courses in the spring semester of their Junior Year. The instructors to maximize areas of intersection and complementation will carefully coordinate the courses. The Biology of Cancer will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling networks involved in malignant transformation, with a strong emphasis on the experimental approaches to cancer study. Mathematical Techniques in the Biological sciences will survey biostatistical methods with a focus on network modeling. The project mentors will meet with the student cohort throughout the semester to further underscore the course connections and begin developing research questions that exploit the genomic approaches used to understand cancer coupled with the mathematical tools used to analyze large datasets and construct mathematical models. The students will form teams of 2-4 student researchers who will return to campus for an eight-week summer research experience. The projects will all utilized the human leukemia cell line, HL-60. HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate in culture into one of several non-dividing specialized myeloid cell types. Differentiation results in the conversion of cells exhibiting a cancer cell phenotype to a normal cell phenotype through genetic reprogramming mediated by changes in gene expression. These changes will be monitored over time using DNA microarray analysis and the mathematical approaches for analyzing these data, including normalization, tests of significance and clustering will be employed. As data are obtained, students will begin modeling the expression responses in the context of signaling networks. These models w

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Michael Roberts


Abby Christine Larson (2010)

Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The research project will address the question: What are the molecular differences between human leukemia cells and differentiated human blood cells? Profs. Roberts and Forrester will direct the team of 6 students in research combining molecular biological and computational methods to elucidate the differences between the "cancer" genetic program and the "normal cell" genetic program utilizing the human leukemia cell line HL-60. Changes in genetic programs will be determined using DNA microarray analysis as the leukemia cells are induced to assume normal cell properties in culture. A variety of bioinformatics tools will then be applied to the large data sets generated to uncover the molecular mechanisms in play and to model and predict changes in gene activity that mediate the cancer to normal cell conversion. The ultimate goal of this project is to more fully understand the genetic differences between normal and cancer cells and, in the process, identify new targets for chemotherapy.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Jeffrey Forrester


Abby Christine Larson (2010)

NSF 0827262 UBM: Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The project involves the linkage of a course in Biology, The Biology of Cancer, and a course in Mathematics, Mathematical Techniques in the Biological Sciences. A cohort of 6-10 students from these programs will co-enroll in the courses in the spring semester of their Junior Year. The instructors to maximize areas of intersection and complementation will carefully coordinate the courses. The Biology of Cancer will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling networks involved in malignant transformation, with a strong emphasis on the experimental approaches to cancer study. Mathematical Techniques in the Biological sciences will survey biostatistical methods with a focus on network modeling. The project mentors will meet with the student cohort throughout the semester to further underscore the course connections and begin developing research questions that exploit the genomic approaches used to understand cancer coupled with the mathematical tools used to analyze large datasets and construct mathematical models. The students will form teams of 2-4 student researchers who will return to campus for an eight-week summer research experience. The projects will all utilized the human leukemia cell line, HL-60. HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate in culture into one of several non-dividing specialized myeloid cell types. Differentiation results in the conversion of cells exhibiting a cancer cell phenotype to a normal cell phenotype through genetic reprogramming mediated by changes in gene expression. These changes will be monitored over time using DNA microarray analysis and the mathematical approaches for analyzing these data, including normalization, tests of significance and clustering will be employed. As data are obtained, students will begin modeling the expression responses in the context of signaling networks. These models w

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Michael Roberts


Michael Webster Mansuy (2012)

NSF 0827262 UBM: Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The project involves the linkage of a course in Biology, The Biology of Cancer, and a course in Mathematics, Mathematical Techniques in the Biological Sciences. A cohort of 6-10 students from these programs will co-enroll in the courses in the spring semester of their Junior Year. The instructors to maximize areas of intersection and complementation will carefully coordinate the courses. The Biology of Cancer will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling networks involved in malignant transformation, with a strong emphasis on the experimental approaches to cancer study. Mathematical Techniques in the Biological sciences will survey biostatistical methods with a focus on network modeling. The project mentors will meet with the student cohort throughout the semester to further underscore the course connections and begin developing research questions that exploit the genomic approaches used to understand cancer coupled with the mathematical tools used to analyze large datasets and construct mathematical models. The students will form teams of 2-4 student researchers who will return to campus for an eight-week summer research experience. The projects will all utilized the human leukemia cell line, HL-60. HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate in culture into one of several non-dividing specialized myeloid cell types. Differentiation results in the conversion of cells exhibiting a cancer cell phenotype to a normal cell phenotype through genetic reprogramming mediated by changes in gene expression. These changes will be monitored over time using DNA microarray analysis and the mathematical approaches for analyzing these data, including normalization, tests of significance and clustering will be employed. As data are obtained, students will begin modeling the expression responses in the context of signaling networks. These models w

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Michael Roberts


Senaka Yoshio Ratnayake (2010)

Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The research project will address the question: What are the molecular differences between human leukemia cells and differentiated human blood cells? Profs. Roberts and Forrester will direct the team of 6 students in research combining molecular biological and computational methods to elucidate the differences between the "cancer" genetic program and the "normal cell" genetic program utilizing the human leukemia cell line HL-60. Changes in genetic programs will be determined using DNA microarray analysis as the leukemia cells are induced to assume normal cell properties in culture. A variety of bioinformatics tools will then be applied to the large data sets generated to uncover the molecular mechanisms in play and to model and predict changes in gene activity that mediate the cancer to normal cell conversion. The ultimate goal of this project is to more fully understand the genetic differences between normal and cancer cells and, in the process, identify new targets for chemotherapy.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Jeffrey Forrester


Senaka Yoshio Ratnayake (2010)

NSF 0827262 UBM: Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The project involves the linkage of a course in Biology, The Biology of Cancer, and a course in Mathematics, Mathematical Techniques in the Biological Sciences. A cohort of 6-10 students from these programs will co-enroll in the courses in the spring semester of their Junior Year. The instructors to maximize areas of intersection and complementation will carefully coordinate the courses. The Biology of Cancer will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling networks involved in malignant transformation, with a strong emphasis on the experimental approaches to cancer study. Mathematical Techniques in the Biological sciences will survey biostatistical methods with a focus on network modeling. The project mentors will meet with the student cohort throughout the semester to further underscore the course connections and begin developing research questions that exploit the genomic approaches used to understand cancer coupled with the mathematical tools used to analyze large datasets and construct mathematical models. The students will form teams of 2-4 student researchers who will return to campus for an eight-week summer research experience. The projects will all utilized the human leukemia cell line, HL-60. HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate in culture into one of several non-dividing specialized myeloid cell types. Differentiation results in the conversion of cells exhibiting a cancer cell phenotype to a normal cell phenotype through genetic reprogramming mediated by changes in gene expression. These changes will be monitored over time using DNA microarray analysis and the mathematical approaches for analyzing these data, including normalization, tests of significance and clustering will be employed. As data are obtained, students will begin modeling the expression responses in the context of signaling networks. These models w

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Michael Roberts


Adnan Zahir Solaiman (2010)

NSF 0827262 UBM: Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The project involves the linkage of a course in Biology, The Biology of Cancer, and a course in Mathematics, Mathematical Techniques in the Biological Sciences. A cohort of 6-10 students from these programs will co-enroll in the courses in the spring semester of their Junior Year. The instructors to maximize areas of intersection and complementation will carefully coordinate the courses. The Biology of Cancer will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling networks involved in malignant transformation, with a strong emphasis on the experimental approaches to cancer study. Mathematical Techniques in the Biological sciences will survey biostatistical methods with a focus on network modeling. The project mentors will meet with the student cohort throughout the semester to further underscore the course connections and begin developing research questions that exploit the genomic approaches used to understand cancer coupled with the mathematical tools used to analyze large datasets and construct mathematical models. The students will form teams of 2-4 student researchers who will return to campus for an eight-week summer research experience. The projects will all utilized the human leukemia cell line, HL-60. HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate in culture into one of several non-dividing specialized myeloid cell types. Differentiation results in the conversion of cells exhibiting a cancer cell phenotype to a normal cell phenotype through genetic reprogramming mediated by changes in gene expression. These changes will be monitored over time using DNA microarray analysis and the mathematical approaches for analyzing these data, including normalization, tests of significance and clustering will be employed. As data are obtained, students will begin modeling the expression responses in the context of signaling networks. These models w

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Michael Roberts


Adnan Zahir Solaiman (2010)

Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The research project will address the question: What are the molecular differences between human leukemia cells and differentiated human blood cells? Profs. Roberts and Forrester will direct the team of 6 students in research combining molecular biological and computational methods to elucidate the differences between the "cancer" genetic program and the "normal cell" genetic program utilizing the human leukemia cell line HL-60. Changes in genetic programs will be determined using DNA microarray analysis as the leukemia cells are induced to assume normal cell properties in culture. A variety of bioinformatics tools will then be applied to the large data sets generated to uncover the molecular mechanisms in play and to model and predict changes in gene activity that mediate the cancer to normal cell conversion. The ultimate goal of this project is to more fully understand the genetic differences between normal and cancer cells and, in the process, identify new targets for chemotherapy.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Jeffrey Forrester


Emily Marie Swain (2010)

NSF 0827262 UBM: Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The project involves the linkage of a course in Biology, The Biology of Cancer, and a course in Mathematics, Mathematical Techniques in the Biological Sciences. A cohort of 6-10 students from these programs will co-enroll in the courses in the spring semester of their Junior Year. The instructors to maximize areas of intersection and complementation will carefully coordinate the courses. The Biology of Cancer will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling networks involved in malignant transformation, with a strong emphasis on the experimental approaches to cancer study. Mathematical Techniques in the Biological sciences will survey biostatistical methods with a focus on network modeling. The project mentors will meet with the student cohort throughout the semester to further underscore the course connections and begin developing research questions that exploit the genomic approaches used to understand cancer coupled with the mathematical tools used to analyze large datasets and construct mathematical models. The students will form teams of 2-4 student researchers who will return to campus for an eight-week summer research experience. The projects will all utilized the human leukemia cell line, HL-60. HL-60 cells can be induced to differentiate in culture into one of several non-dividing specialized myeloid cell types. Differentiation results in the conversion of cells exhibiting a cancer cell phenotype to a normal cell phenotype through genetic reprogramming mediated by changes in gene expression. These changes will be monitored over time using DNA microarray analysis and the mathematical approaches for analyzing these data, including normalization, tests of significance and clustering will be employed. As data are obtained, students will begin modeling the expression responses in the context of signaling networks. These models w

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Michael Roberts


Emily Marie Swain (2010)

Exploiting the Synergy of Mathematical and Molecular Biological Approaches in Studying a Complex Problem

The research project will address the question: What are the molecular differences between human leukemia cells and differentiated human blood cells? Profs. Roberts and Forrester will direct the team of 6 students in research combining molecular biological and computational methods to elucidate the differences between the "cancer" genetic program and the "normal cell" genetic program utilizing the human leukemia cell line HL-60. Changes in genetic programs will be determined using DNA microarray analysis as the leukemia cells are induced to assume normal cell properties in culture. A variety of bioinformatics tools will then be applied to the large data sets generated to uncover the molecular mechanisms in play and to model and predict changes in gene activity that mediate the cancer to normal cell conversion. The ultimate goal of this project is to more fully understand the genetic differences between normal and cancer cells and, in the process, identify new targets for chemotherapy.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Jeffrey Forrester


Campus Life

Grace Hemphill Lange (2012)

Sustainable Communities Eco-Reps

Sustainable Communities Eco-Reps

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Elizabeth Farner


Center for Sustainability Education

Jordan Emily Haferbier (2013)

Playing for Keeps Along the Susquehanna: A Community-Integrated GIS of Land and Water Uses and Rights in Rural Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Play

The sabbatical project will result in two conference presentations and one publication in peer reviewed journal (three different, but related topics).

Term Funded:Spring 2011
Professor: Simona Perry


Grace Hemphill Lange (2012)

NASA GCCE Grant: Climate Change Mosaic

Climate Change Mosaic

Term Funded:Fall 2011
Professor: Neil Leary


Rizwan Mohamed Saffie (2014)

Taking Aim at Climate Change

Taking Aim at Climate Change

Term Funded:Spring 2011
Professor: Neil Leary


Tomas Sanguinetti (2014)

Playing for Keeps Along the Susquehanna: A Community-Integrated GIS of Land and Water Uses and Rights in Rural Pennsylvania's Marcellus Shale Natural Gas Play

This community-based project will use a participatory process to create a Geographic Information System (GIS) that describes the local socio-cultural interpretations attached to one or more sub-basins of the Susquehanna River within the extent of the Marcellus Shale natural gas play in rural Pennsylvania. The project seeks to ask the question: What are the different meanings local rural landowners attach to the Susquehanna River, and how do those meanings relate spatially to negotiations over competing uses and rights to surface water and groundwater in light of natural gas exploration and development? Using focus groups, local landowners will cognitively and spatially explore their "sense of place" within the Susquehanna River watershed, share experiences related to environmental and social changes, cognitively and spatially map relationships to social, political, and economic factors, and access their roles in on-going negotiations over the river's development and management related to natural gas exploration and development.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: Simona Perry


Brett Andrew Shollenberger (2011)

NASA GCCE Grant: Climate Education & Media

Climate Education & Media

Term Funded:Fall 2010
Professor: Sarah Brylinsky


Laura Claiborne Stone (2012)

NASA GCCE Grant:Taking Aim at Climate Change

Taking Aim at Climate Change

Term Funded:Spring 2011
Professor: Neil Leary


Chemistry

Caroline Aurore Allison (2004)

Synthesis of TFIIIA uising in vitro reactions

In order for a cell to encode and transmit genetic information, specific proteins must interact and bind to certain nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) molecules. These interactions can be investigated using various biochemical and physical in vitro ("outside of the cell") techniques. Currently, the use of chemical nucleases have proven extremely useful in determining the nature of how proteins use their amino acids to identify and contact a nucleic acid. The chemical nuclease is first attached onto the protein which then interacts with nucleic acid molecules. When the nuclease cuts the nucleic acid molecule at a specific point, then a possible contact between the amino acid of the protein and the nucleic acid can be identified. The use of chemical nucleases requires the production of a protein using in vitro extract reactions while maintaining the protein's ability to interact with nucleic acids. In the proposed project, we will determine optimal conditions for producing TFIIIA (protein capable of binding DNA and RNA) during in vitro reactions and then investigate the ability of this TFIIIA to interact with nucleic acid molecules.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Pamela Higgins


Caroline Aurore Allison (2004)

Synthesis of TFIIIA uising in vitro reactions

In order for a cell to encode and transmit genetic information, specific proteins must interact and bind to certain nucleic acid (DNA/RNA) molecules. These interactions can be investigated using various biochemical and physical in vitro ("outside of the cell") techniques. Currently, the use of chemical nucleases have proven extremely useful in determining the nature of how proteins use their amino acids to identify and contact a nucleic acid. The chemical nuclease is first attached onto the protein which then interacts with nucleic acid molecules. When the nuclease cuts the nucleic acid molecule at a specific point, then a possible contact between the amino acid of the protein and the nucleic acid can be identified. The use of chemical nucleases requires the production of a protein using in vitro extract reactions while maintaining the protein's ability to interact with nucleic acids. In the proposed project, we will determine optimal conditions for producing TFIIIA (protein capable of binding DNA and RNA) during in vitro reactions and then investigate the ability of this TFIIIA to interact with nucleic acid molecules.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Pamela Higgins


Kimberly C Anderman (1992)

Matrix-isolation of two Hydrocarbon Complexes Characterized by Infrared Spectroscopy

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1991
Professor: Cindy Samet


Kimberly C Anderman (1992)

Matrix Isolation and ab Initio Study fo the 1:1 complexes of Bromocyclopropane with NH3 and (CH3)3N: evidens for a novel C-H---N Hydrogen Bond

Hydrocarbon-base matrix FTIR studies

Term Funded:Year 1992
Professor: Cindy Samet


Kimberly C Anderman (1992)

Matrix Isolation and ab Initio Study fo the 1:1 complexes of Bromocyclopropane with NH3 and (CH3)3N: evidens for a novel C-H---N Hydrogen Bond

Hydrocarbon-base matrix FTIR studies

Term Funded:Summer 1991
Professor: Cindy Samet


Laura Ashley Bahorich (2007)

The Transition Metal-Arene Bond: A Laxer Flash Photolysis Study

I am requesting supplemental funding for this project that is primarily supported through a grant from the American Chemical Society (PRF). As indicated on the PRF budget sheet, I will be hiring two students to conduct research with me this summer. Both will be responsible for setting up the experiment, acquiring and then analyzing the data. I will expect them to prepare a poster detailing the results and with the budgeted travel funds, we will present the results at a national American Chemical Society meeting. In the past, students have found that the projects they have worked on have been beneficial to their growth as scientists. The students are exposed to experiments that involve the use of equipment and techniques that are not formally introduced in the classroom and associated labs.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Laura Ashley Bahorich (2007)

Investigating the n2 bonding interactions between aromatic molecules and transition metal centers

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Sunil Baidar (2009)

High Performance Liquid Chromatograph with fluorescence detection studies

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Amy Witter


Sunil Baidar (2009)

SACP--Investigating sources of contamination to the Conodoguinet Creek Watershed

Many secreted and cell-surface proteins in mammals and bacteria are glycoproteins. Glycoproteins are proteins in which multiple sugar residues are covalently attached to the protein backbone through an asparagine or serine residue. Because sugar attachment often occurs through a nitrogen atom, the sugars are referred to as N-linked glycans. The structures of N-linked glycans are complex and as a result, their biological functions were largely ignored until recently. This project involves teaching two undergraduates the analytical methods for characterizing N-linked glycans in a model organism, marine bacteria. Marine bacteria are chosen because they grow quickly, and because I have an on-going collaboration with a colleague who is an expert in marine microbiology. Additionally, their genomes have recently been sequenced, allowing us to ask broader questions based on preliminary results from these studies.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Amy Witter


Alexander Bernard Dante Baker (2004)

NSF 0107777 RUI: Infrared Matrix Isolation Studies of Cyclic Hydrocarbons with Nitrogen and Oxygen bases, II

Funding from NSF would support an in-depth study of the hydrogen bonding in hydrocarbon base complexes. The binary complexes proposed involve a hydrocarbon that acts as a weak acid and a nitrogen or oxygen base that is likely to interact with the hydrocarbon acid via the lone pair of electrons on its electronegative nitrogen (N) or oxygen (0) atom. The hydrocarbons to be studied are cyclopropane, cyclopentadiene, and benzene, all of which are cyclic hydrocarbons. Several substituted analogs of each hydrocarbon will be studied. The bases that will be used to form the hydrocarbon acid-base binary complex are ammonia, trimethylamine, and dimethyl ether. The technique of matrix isolation combined with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy will be employed to probe the interaction between the hydrocarbon and base. The "parent" hydrocarbons and bases will be matrix-isolated in argon separately and then codeposited in the same matrix. The product or complex spectrum will then be compared to parent or "blank" spectra. Preliminary work done in the laboratory of the Principal Investigator demonstrates that the hydrogen bonding in the proposed binary complexes is extremely weak, resulting in frequency shifts (from parent to complex spectrum) on the order of 1-3 cm-1. Such weak hydrogen bonding in hydrocarbon-base complexes containing it-bonding electrons has received little attention, and it is not known whether the base will interact with the pi system of the hydrocarbon ring or with the acidic proton on the ring. A primary goal of the project is to investigate C-H hydrogen bonding and its dependence on the hybridization of the s and p orbitals of the C and on the presence of electron withdrawing substituents. The behavior of the proposed binary acid-base complexes will serve as a model for hydro

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Cindy Samet


Alexander Bernard Dante Baker (2004)

NSF 0107777 RUI: Infrared Matrix Isolation Studies of Cyclic Hydrocarbons with Nitrogen and Oxygen bases, II

Funding from NSF would support an in-depth study of the hydrogen bonding in hydrocarbon base complexes. The binary complexes proposed involve a hydrocarbon that acts as a weak acid and a nitrogen or oxygen base that is likely to interact with the hydrocarbon acid via the lone pair of electrons on its electronegative nitrogen (N) or oxygen (0) atom. The hydrocarbons to be studied are cyclopropane, cyclopentadiene, and benzene, all of which are cyclic hydrocarbons. Several substituted analogs of each hydrocarbon will be studied. The bases that will be used to form the hydrocarbon acid-base binary complex are ammonia, trimethylamine, and dimethyl ether. The technique of matrix isolation combined with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy will be employed to probe the interaction between the hydrocarbon and base. The "parent" hydrocarbons and bases will be matrix-isolated in argon separately and then codeposited in the same matrix. The product or complex spectrum will then be compared to parent or "blank" spectra. Preliminary work done in the laboratory of the Principal Investigator demonstrates that the hydrogen bonding in the proposed binary complexes is extremely weak, resulting in frequency shifts (from parent to complex spectrum) on the order of 1-3 cm-1. Such weak hydrogen bonding in hydrocarbon-base complexes containing it-bonding electrons has received little attention, and it is not known whether the base will interact with the pi system of the hydrocarbon ring or with the acidic proton on the ring. A primary goal of the project is to investigate C-H hydrogen bonding and its dependence on the hybridization of the s and p orbitals of the C and on the presence of electron withdrawing substituents. The behavior of the proposed binary acid-base complexes will serve as a model for hydro

Term Funded:Fall 2004
Professor: Cindy Samet


Alexander Bernard Dante Baker (2004)

NSF 0107777 RUI: Infrared Matrix Isolation Studies of Cyclic Hydrocarbons with Nitrogen and Oxygen bases, II

Funding from NSF would support an in-depth study of the hydrogen bonding in hydrocarbon base complexes. The binary complexes proposed involve a hydrocarbon that acts as a weak acid and a nitrogen or oxygen base that is likely to interact with the hydrocarbon acid via the lone pair of electrons on its electronegative nitrogen (N) or oxygen (0) atom. The hydrocarbons to be studied are cyclopropane, cyclopentadiene, and benzene, all of which are cyclic hydrocarbons. Several substituted analogs of each hydrocarbon will be studied. The bases that will be used to form the hydrocarbon acid-base binary complex are ammonia, trimethylamine, and dimethyl ether. The technique of matrix isolation combined with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy will be employed to probe the interaction between the hydrocarbon and base. The "parent" hydrocarbons and bases will be matrix-isolated in argon separately and then codeposited in the same matrix. The product or complex spectrum will then be compared to parent or "blank" spectra. Preliminary work done in the laboratory of the Principal Investigator demonstrates that the hydrogen bonding in the proposed binary complexes is extremely weak, resulting in frequency shifts (from parent to complex spectrum) on the order of 1-3 cm-1. Such weak hydrogen bonding in hydrocarbon-base complexes containing it-bonding electrons has received little attention, and it is not known whether the base will interact with the pi system of the hydrocarbon ring or with the acidic proton on the ring. A primary goal of the project is to investigate C-H hydrogen bonding and its dependence on the hybridization of the s and p orbitals of the C and on the presence of electron withdrawing substituents. The behavior of the proposed binary acid-base complexes will serve as a model for hydro

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Cindy Samet


Alexander Bernard Dante Baker (2004)

NSF 0107777 RUI: Infrared Matrix Isolation Studies of Cyclic Hydrocarbons with Nitrogen and Oxygen bases, II

Funding from NSF would support an in-depth study of the hydrogen bonding in hydrocarbon base complexes. The binary complexes proposed involve a hydrocarbon that acts as a weak acid and a nitrogen or oxygen base that is likely to interact with the hydrocarbon acid via the lone pair of electrons on its electronegative nitrogen (N) or oxygen (0) atom. The hydrocarbons to be studied are cyclopropane, cyclopentadiene, and benzene, all of which are cyclic hydrocarbons. Several substituted analogs of each hydrocarbon will be studied. The bases that will be used to form the hydrocarbon acid-base binary complex are ammonia, trimethylamine, and dimethyl ether. The technique of matrix isolation combined with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy will be employed to probe the interaction between the hydrocarbon and base. The "parent" hydrocarbons and bases will be matrix-isolated in argon separately and then codeposited in the same matrix. The product or complex spectrum will then be compared to parent or "blank" spectra. Preliminary work done in the laboratory of the Principal Investigator demonstrates that the hydrogen bonding in the proposed binary complexes is extremely weak, resulting in frequency shifts (from parent to complex spectrum) on the order of 1-3 cm-1. Such weak hydrogen bonding in hydrocarbon-base complexes containing it-bonding electrons has received little attention, and it is not known whether the base will interact with the pi system of the hydrocarbon ring or with the acidic proton on the ring. A primary goal of the project is to investigate C-H hydrogen bonding and its dependence on the hybridization of the s and p orbitals of the C and on the presence of electron withdrawing substituents. The behavior of the proposed binary acid-base complexes will serve as a model for hydro

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Cindy Samet


Alexander Bernard Dante Baker (2004)

Infrared Matrix Isolation Studies of Cyclic Hydrocarbons

Funding from NSF would support the continuation of studies involving C-H---N(O) hydrogen bonding in hydrocarbon-base complexes. The technique of matrix isolation combined with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy will be employed to probe the interaction between the hydrocarbon and base. In the short term, this work will serve to elucidate the conditions necessary for hydrogen bond formation to occur and will allow a correlation between hydrogen bond strength and extent of substitution of the hydrocarbon. In the long term the behavior of the proposed binary acid-base complexes will serve as a model for hydrogen bonding in more complicated systems such as organic liquid crystals and large biomolecules.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Cindy Samet


Stephen Brennan Barone (1990)

An Application of the Multiple Time-Dependent Calibration Curve

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1989
Professor: Robert Leyon


Eric Larson Barth (2007)

Design, synthesis and assay ofcyclopropane-containing agonists of a-adrenergic agents

In our previous report, we described work toward the coupling of aromatic rings, formation of the cyclopropyl group from an cz4S-unsaturated nitrile and the conversion of the nitrile into an imidazoline ring. During the summer of 2006, our work on this project focused on two primary areas: completing the study of the microwave-mediated Suzuki couplings with aryltrifluoroborate salts and bringing the individual transformations together into a complete synthetic pathway leading to the target molecules.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: David Crouch


Eric Larson Barth (2007)

Design, synthesis and assay ofcyclopropane-containing agonists of a-adrenergic agents

In our previous report, we described work toward the coupling of aromatic rings, formation of the cyclopropyl group from an cz4S-unsaturated nitrile and the conversion of the nitrile into an imidazoline ring. During the summer of 2006, our work on this project focused on two primary areas: completing the study of the microwave-mediated Suzuki couplings with aryltrifluoroborate salts and bringing the individual transformations together into a complete synthetic pathway leading to the target molecules.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: David Crouch


Megan Christine Blair (2002)

Purification and Analysis of Phytochelatins

This research project focuses on the environmental problem of metal pollution and addresses understanding environmental cleanup efforts of these metals through the use of plants. Phytochelatins are intracellular peptides in plants that are produced in response to sub-lethal metal concentrations. These peptides vary in length from five amino acids to twenty-three amino acids and contain alternating glutamic acid and cysteine residues with a terminal glycine residue. Phytochelatins bind to and sequester the metal ions, rendering them non-toxic to the plant. The study of phytochelatin production and the metal binding properties should be explored in order to expand our understanding of plant response to metal stress. To investigate this process, we plan to use yeast as a model system because they possess the same ability as plants to produce phytochelatins. Initial work in my lab has shown that we can obtain partial purification through bulk methods. The final purification step will utilize high pressure liquid chromatography, and it is this method that we will continue to develop. Preliminary results from this semester using the copper-phytochelatin complex show that this method should purify the phytochelatins to homogeneity. This summer we will utilize a metal with a different ionic radius and determine the length of the phytochelatin produced. By doing a systematic study where only the size of the metal ion used is varied, we can learn more about the production of these short peptides. Additionally, we would like to explore the oxidation-reduction chemistry of these systems. An increase in our knowledge of natural response to metal toxicity can be extended toward enhancing environmental cleanup efforts through processes such as rhizofiltration.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Joyce Whitehead


Erin Gramm Boyd (2000)

The Role of Metals in the Cytotoxic Activity of the Anthracycline Drugs

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Joyce Whitehead


Erin Gramm Boyd (2000)

The Effect of the First Row Transition Metals on the Metal Uptake, Culture Health and Phytochelatin Production in Yeast

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Joyce Whitehead


Allyson Jane Boyington (2015)

An Investigation of Microwave-acceleration of Sliyl Deprotection Reactions

This project will investigate the use of microwave irradiation to accelerate the removal of silyl protecting groups from phenolic oxygens. Silyl groups contain a silicon atom and are often used to temporarily render an alcohol or phenol unreactive. This allows another reaction with which the alcohol might interfere to proceed. Recently, the use of catalytic amounts of lithium acetate have been reported to allow such deprotection reactions to occur. Although this method uses an especially mild reagent, the reactions times are quite lengthy. We wish to investigate the use of modern laboratory microwave ovens to accelerate this reaction. Preliminary experiments show that high yields of deprotected product can be achieved using microwave irradiation over a 30 - 60 minute period, considerably less than the 8 - 24 hours reported. But we need to establish the optimal conditions for the microwave version of this reaction and then test its generality on other silyl protected alcohols and phenols.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: David Crouch


Aaron Dale Brumbaugh (2014)

Synthesis and Analysis of Bioreduced Nanoparticles

This project will involve the synthesis and characterization of metal and metal oxide nanoparticles. The nanoparticles used in this study range in size from spheres of less than 5 nm in diameter to hexagonal or triangular platelets that are several hundred nanometers per side. All particles will be synthesized with leaf teas as chemical reducing agents. Lemongrass and ginkgo leaves can be boiled (separately), and the resulting teas aid in the formation of gold, silver, mixed gold and silver, and copper oxide particles. We will use a variety of analytical techniques, including electron microscopy, to help us understand the sizes and compositions of our nanoparticles. With more knowledge about the reactions and the particles, we can look forward to finding applications-in catalysis or spectroscopy-for our nanoparticles.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Sarah St. Angelo


Amy Beth Cadwallader (2001)

Study of the ZnCl2-H20 Mediated Removal of Silyl Protecting Groups

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: David Crouch


Tianyi Cai (2013)

Synthesis of Alpha-Methylene Butyrolactones

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Catherine Bridget Campbell (2012)

Microwave Acceleration of the Orthoester Claisen Rearrangement

This project will investigate the use of microwave irradiation to accelerate the orthoester Claisen reaction, allowing chemists to complete the reaction more quickly than the typical 1 to 12 hours that is typical of this reaction. In the last 20 years, microwave ovens have been developed for laboratory use. Reactions can safely be heated rapidly to high temperatures not attainable in a regular flask and, as a result, reactions can be completed in minutes instead of hours. Despite the utility of the orthoester Claisen rearrangement, to date, no reports of modern microwave techniques - in which temperature and pressure are monitored and controlled - to accelerate this reaction have been reported. If this project is successful, we anticipate publishing the results in a mainline organic chemistry journal.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: David Crouch


Thanprakorn Chiramanewong (2013)

Investigation of the contribution of structure and reactivity to the selective cytotoxicity of germacranolide natural products

The natural product parthenolide has been shown to selectively ablate leukemia stem cells, and its derivative, dimethylaminoparthenolide, is currently in clinical trials for treatment of acute myelogenous leukemia. Parthenolide is a member of the sesquiterpene lactone family of natural products, which bear an ±-methylene-³-butyrolactone reactive group that can modify proteins through Michael addition of biological nucleophiles, such as thiols. In order to determine the effect of structure on the reactivity of ±-methylene-³-butyrolactone-containing natural products with cellular proteins, we will synthesize alkynylated derivatives of the parthenolide, as well as two model compounds. These lactones will be evaluated for toxicity and cellular response in the human acute myelogenous leukemia cell line, THP-1, in comparison to the natural products themselves using cell viability assays, Western blotting, and cell-based apoptosis assays.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Thanprakorn Chiramanewong (2013)

Cellular Effects of Parthenolide Derivatives

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Rebecca Anne Cleiman (2002)

Selective Removal of Triphenylsilyl Protecting Groups

This proposal describes a study of the use of a basic, non-aqueous system to selectively remove the triphenylsilyl group from alcohols without affecting other silyl protecting groups. Such selective desilylation reactions have become increasingly important in synthetic organic chemistry as targets for synthesis have become more intricate and challenging. Preliminary work last summer and during the current academic year indicates that our previously-developed system of NaOH in 1,4-dioxane might be effective in this process. We have already demonstrated that most silyl groups are largely inert to these conditions while the more base-sensitive triphenylsilyl group appears to be susceptible to removal.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: David Crouch


Rebecca Anne Cleiman (2002)

Selective Removal of Triphenylsilyl Protecting Groups

This proposal describes a study of the use of a basic, non-aqueous system to selectively remove the triphenylsilyl group from alcohols without affecting other silyl protecting groups. Such selective desilylation reactions have become increasingly important in synthetic organic chemistry as targets for synthesis have become more intricate and challenging. Preliminary work last summer and during the current academic year indicates that our previously-developed system of NaOH in 1,4-dioxane might be effective in this process. We have already demonstrated that most silyl groups are largely inert to these conditions while the more base-sensitive triphenylsilyl group appears to be susceptible to removal.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: David Crouch


Andrew Geoffrey Cohen (1999)

Selective Removal of Silyl Protecting Groups

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: David Crouch


Katelyn Ann Cohen (2012)

Electron Microscopy of Nanoparticles Synthesized via Green Chemistry

Electron Microscopy of Nanoparticles Synthesized via Green Chemistry

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Sarah St. Angelo


Kristina Ann Cole (1992)

Synthesis of Molecules usingO-arylhydroxylamines

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1991
Professor: Michael Holden


Francis Furst Daily (2013)

Matrix Isolation Studies

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: Cindy Samet


Francis Furst Daily (2013)

Matrix Isolation Studies

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Cindy Samet


Gabriel J DiNatale (2014)

Exploring the mechanism of action of the anti-leukemic drug, parthenolide

Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) occurs in about 1 out of 250,000 people and long-term survival with AML is poor. This project will study how a potential anti-leukemia therapeutic, parthenolide, interacts with cells and proteins. We will use compounds derived from parthenolide to identify the components of the original molecule that are required to maintain anti-leukemia activity. We will also identify the patterns of proteins within leukemia cells that are modified by parthenolide and our synthesized derivatives using activity-based protein profiling. Understanding how the component parts of parthenolide affect its anti-leukemic properties and interact with proteins in cancer cells can guide the development of new cancer therapeutics.

Term Funded: 2011
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Gabriel J DiNatale (2014)

Investigation of the cellular action of the natural product, parthenolide.

Parthenolide, a natural product from the plant feverfew, has well documented chemotherapeutic properties. Water-soluble derivatives of parthenolide are currently undergoing clinical trials for treatment of leukemia. Despite these successes, the mechanism by which parthenolide and its derivatives interfere with celular processes in cancer cells is not well understood. Using derivatives of parthenolide synthesized in the lab, we plan to identify the action of parthenolide that contributes to its efficacy as a chemotherapeutic. We will use a chemoselective ligation reaction to label cellular targets of the drug with an affinity tag, biotin for subsequent detection and purification. Further understanding of the mecahnism of parthenolide action will pave the way for development of similar chemotherapeutic agents.

Term Funded:Fall 2011
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Rebecca Jaye Driesen (2009)

Synthesis and stability of 1,2-diazetidine derivatives

1,2-Diazetidine derivatives have anti-bacterial activity and serve as active ingredients in ointments. Due to the enormous ring strain in the four-membered dinitrogen molecule; it is prone to facile ring opening and subsequent loss in reaction yields. Methods used to prepare this compound include the [2+2] cycloaddition and intramolecular ring closure. While some of these procedures suffer from poor yields, successful ones are plagued with separation problems and the use of methylene chlwide - a known carcinogen. Therefore the goal of this project shall be to prepare 1,2-diazetidine derivatives employing the intramolecular ring closure of azine derivatives, with loss of unsaturation promoted by vanadium (I) reagent in tetrahydrofruan. It is expected that this method be high yielding and attract the attention of pharmoceutical companies.

Term Funded:Spring 2007
Professor: Paul Fregene


Alice Ann Duchon (2011)

Synthesis of a Copper-Distamycin Conjugate and its Reactivity with DNA

The goal of this project is to synthesize an artificial nuclease that will selectively bind to and cleave DNA for use as an anticancer drug. This will be accomplished by tethering a DNA binding domain to a copper(II)-containing catalytic domain to generate a copper-distamycin conjugate. Once the compound has been thoroughly characterized, its reactivity with DNA will be evaluated. Analysis of this type will ideally lead to a greater understanding of the factors responsible for oxidative damage to DNA by copper and should aid in the design of new compounds with pharmaceutical potential.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Kristi Humphreys


Rebecca Lynn Duttry (2007)

Design, synthesis and assay ofcyclopropane-containing agonists of a-adrenergic agents

In our previous report, we described work toward the coupling of aromatic rings, formation of the cyclopropyl group from an cz4S-unsaturated nitrile and the conversion of the nitrile into an imidazoline ring. During the summer of 2006, our work on this project focused on two primary areas: completing the study of the microwave-mediated Suzuki couplings with aryltrifluoroborate salts and bringing the individual transformations together into a complete synthetic pathway leading to the target molecules.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: David Crouch


Rebecca Lynn Duttry (2007)

Design, synthesis and assay ofcyclopropane-containing agonists of a-adrenergic agents

In our previous report, we described work toward the coupling of aromatic rings, formation of the cyclopropyl group from an cz4S-unsaturated nitrile and the conversion of the nitrile into an imidazoline ring. During the summer of 2006, our work on this project focused on two primary areas: completing the study of the microwave-mediated Suzuki couplings with aryltrifluoroborate salts and bringing the individual transformations together into a complete synthetic pathway leading to the target molecules.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: David Crouch


Rebecca Lynn Duttry (2007)

Design, Synthesis and Assay of Cyclopropane-Containing Analogs of ±-Adrenergic Agents

This is an expedited proposal seeking room and board for a summer research student who will be working on a Research Corporation-funded project. This request includes $500 in matching funds for the purchase of lab supplies and reagents. The student will assist in the development of synthetic protocols aimed at preparing a series of compounds that are analogs of a-adrenergic agents. Specifically, we hope to develop solid-phase procedures that will allow us to efficiently prepare a series of compounds for testing on a1 receptors by a collaborator at the University of New Mexico School of Medicine. The student will perform reactions to bond the starting material to the solid support and carry out studies to determine the optimum conditions for subsequent reactions. The student will purify and characterize reaction products using techniques such as column chromatography and high field NMR spectroscopy.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: David Crouch


Brian Richard Elford (1994)

Carbonylation of Organoiron Systems

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: Michael Holden


Robert Raymond Fehnel (2005)

Investigating the n2 bonding interactions between aromatic molecules and transition metal centers

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Robert Raymond Fehnel (2005)

Investigating the reactivity of metal-arene bonds

My expectation is that the students will be involved in every aspect of the proposed research effort, from obtaining data to analyzing and then presenting it at regional and national conferences. Because successful completion of the project will require setting up a laser flash photolysis apparatus, the students will be able to learn skills that have not been formally introduced in the classroom. From a pedagogical perspective a further benefit of the proposed research is that it will allow students to learn about the application of lasers in chemistry. Lasers have become an important tool in chemistry and their widespread use has made it necessary to introduce laser based experiments into the undergraduate chemistry curriculum. The proposed experiments are therefore part of a vision that aims to provide undergraduates with an opportunity to familiarize themselves with the use of modern instrumentation employed in the study of chemistry.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Nicholas Philip Ferenz (2003)

Effects of Nutrient limitation on phytoplankton-derived organic matter and consequences for bacterial community structure

We have a reasonable understanding of how Fe and N availability influence the production of particulate organic carbon by phytoplankton and the resulting consequences for carbon export and storage in the ocean. However, we know very little about how Fe and N limitation affects the production and composition of the largest reservoir of marine fixed carbon, the dissolved organic pool. Our preliminary data make a compelling case that both Fe and N limitation cause large changes in the monosaccharide composition of extracellular carbohydrates produced by phytoplankton. Qualitative changes in labile DOM in turn have large implications for bacterial growth and community composition, and thus for the remineralization of fixed carbon in the sea. This project will take the first important steps toward exploring the linkage between phytoplankton Fe and N limitation and the quantity and quality of labile DOM, and begin to examine the consequences for the marine microbial community.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Amy Witter


Nicholas Philip Ferenz (2003)

Effects of Nutrient limitation on phytoplankton-derived organic matter and consequences for bacterial community structure

We have a reasonable understanding of how Fe and N availability influence the production of particulate organic carbon by phytoplankton and the resulting consequences for carbon export and storage in the ocean. However, we know very little about how Fe and N limitation affects the production and composition of the largest reservoir of marine fixed carbon, the dissolved organic pool. Our preliminary data make a compelling case that both Fe and N limitation cause large changes in the monosaccharide composition of extracellular carbohydrates produced by phytoplankton. Qualitative changes in labile DOM in turn have large implications for bacterial growth and community composition, and thus for the remineralization of fixed carbon in the sea. This project will take the first important steps toward exploring the linkage between phytoplankton Fe and N limitation and the quantity and quality of labile DOM, and begin to examine the consequences for the marine microbial community.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Amy Witter


Joshua Foong (2011)

Synthesis and Characterization of an Iron-Salen-Glutamic Acid Molecule

A synthetic scheme has been devised to produce a potential chemical nuclease compound (an iron-salen-glutamic acid) that may be instrumental in probing how DNA interacts with proteins in a cell. The multiple reactions required to construct this new nuclease compound must be optimized so that proper analysis of the compound's structure can be conducted. In addition, the ability of the iron-salen-glutamic acid to cut DNA will be assessed in nicking assays to determine if this compound can serve as an effective chemical nuclease molecule.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Pamela Higgins


Nicole V Fultz (2010)

Incorporation of Nanoscience into the Chemistry Curriculum at the Introductory Level

This is an expedited proposal that requests room and board for a student participating in a National Science Foundation funded project to develop nanoscience activities for Chem 111, 141, 241 and 242. The student will adapt and modify published lab activities for these courses and devise new experiments using examples in the nanoscience literature. We hope to have the Scanning Tunneling Microscopes and Atomic Force Microscopes operating by summer and, if this occurs, a large effort will involve developing experiments in which Chem 241 and 242 students can observe the nanoscale behavior of molecules synthesized in the lab.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: David Crouch


Nicole V Fultz (2010)

NSF 0406837 NUE: Incorporation of Nanoscience into the Chemistry Curriculum at the Introductory Level

This is an expedited proposal that requests room and board for a student participating in a National Science Foundation funded project to develop nanoscience activities for Chem 111, 141, 241 and 242. The student will adapt and modify published lab activities for these courses and devise new experiments using examples in the nanoscience literature. We hope to have the Scanning Tunneling Microscopes and Atomic Force Microscopes operating by summer and, if this occurs, a large effort will involve developing experiments in which Chem 241 and 242 students can observe the nanoscale behavior of molecules synthesized in the lab.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: David Crouch


Nicole V Fultz (2010)

Incorporation of Nanoscience into the Chemistry Curriculum at the Introductory Level

This is an expedited proposal that requests room and board for a student participating in a National Science Foundation funded project to develop nanoscience activities for Chem 111, 141, 241 and 242. The student will adapt and modify published lab activities for these courses and devise new experiments using examples in the nanoscience literature. We hope to have the Scanning Tunneling Microscopes and Atomic Force Microscopes operating by summer and, if this occurs, a large effort will involve developing experiments in which Chem 241 and 242 students can observe the nanoscale behavior of molecules synthesized in the lab.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: David Crouch


Amanda M Gellett (2006)

Synthesis and Characterization of Nuclease Activity of Amino Acid Containing Compounds

Chemical nucleases (molecules that damage/cleave DNA) have become a frequently used tool for investigation of the interactions that occur when a nucleic acid binding protein forms a complex with DNA or RNA. Common chemical nucleases incorporated into nucleic acid binding proteins can help elucidate the specific contacts formed in the complex. However, inherent limitations in current chemical nucleases have led to the development of new nuclease compounds. Salen [N, N' bis (salicylidene)-1,2-ethylenediamine] complexes have recently emerged as possible nucleases due to their ability to self-induce DNA damage upon binding. A lysine-ferrocene compound derived in my laboratory has also exhibited some unique abilities in cleaving DNA as well. The current project seeks to synthesize a salen-metal ion complex attached onto an amino acid and investigate subsequent ability of the new compound to cleave DNA molecules. The nuclease activity of this new compound will be compared to that of the lysine-ferrocene compound and common chemical nucleases. These studies will allow determination of whether either/both of these new nuclease compounds are suitable for incorporation into nucleic acid binding proteins and for subsequent use as probes of interaction in protein-nucleic acid complexes.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Pamela Higgins


Amanda M Gellett (2006)

Synthesis and Characterization of Nuclease Activity of Amino Acid Containing Compounds

Chemical nucleases (molecules that damage/cleave DNA) have become a frequently used tool for investigation of the interactions that occur when a nucleic acid binding protein forms a complex with DNA or RNA. Common chemical nucleases incorporated into nucleic acid binding proteins can help elucidate the specific contacts formed in the complex. However, inherent limitations in current chemical nucleases have led to the development of new nuclease compounds. Salen [N, N' bis (salicylidene)-1,2-ethylenediamine] complexes have recently emerged as possible nucleases due to their ability to self-induce DNA damage upon binding. A lysine-ferrocene compound derived in my laboratory has also exhibited some unique abilities in cleaving DNA as well. The current project seeks to synthesize a salen-metal ion complex attached onto an amino acid and investigate subsequent ability of the new compound to cleave DNA molecules. The nuclease activity of this new compound will be compared to that of the lysine-ferrocene compound and common chemical nucleases. These studies will allow determination of whether either/both of these new nuclease compounds are suitable for incorporation into nucleic acid binding proteins and for subsequent use as probes of interaction in protein-nucleic acid complexes.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Pamela Higgins


Christopher Ernest Gentchos (1993)

Infrared Matrix Isolation Studies of Hydrogen Bonds involving C-H bonds: Hydrocarbons with Nitrogen Bases

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: Cindy Samet


Christopher Ernest Gentchos (1993)

Matrix Isolation and ab Initio Study of the 1:1 complexes of Bromocyclopropane with NH3 and (CH3)3N: evidence for a novel C-H---N Hydrogen Bond

Hydrocarbon-base matrix FTIR studies

Term Funded:Fall 1992
Professor: Cindy Samet


Christopher Ernest Gentchos (1993)

Matrix Isolation and ab Initio Study of the 1:1 complexes of Bromocyclopropane with NH3 and (CH3)3N: evidence for a novel C-H---N Hydrogen Bond

Hydrocarbon-base matrix FTIR studies

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: Cindy Samet


Leah Goldfarb (1991)

Matrix Isolation Fourier-Transform Infrared Studies of Hydrocarbon-Ammonia Complexes

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1989
Professor: Cindy Samet


Leah Goldfarb (1991)

Study of hydro-carbon-ammonia bonding

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1990
Professor: Cindy Samet


Leah Goldfarb (1991)

Matrix Isolation and ab Initio Study of the 1:1 complexes of Bromocyclopropane with NH3 and (CH3)3N: evidence for a novel C-H---N Hydrogen Bond

Hydrocarbon-base matrix FTIR studies

Term Funded:Fall 1990
Professor: Cindy Samet


Leah Goldfarb (1991)

Matrix Isolation and ab Initio Study of the 1:1 complexes of Bromocyclopropane with NH3 and (CH3)3N: evidence for a novel C-H---N Hydrogen Bond

Hydrocarbon-base matrix FTIR studies

Term Funded:Spring 1991
Professor: Cindy Samet


Breanna Sophie Goldner (2014)

Analysis of the Effect of BAG5 Truncation Mutants on Chaperone and Ubiquitin Ligase Activity

Neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's are estimated to affect over 5.9 million U.S. adults (NINDS, Alzheimer's Association). Both diseases are characterized by protein aggregation leading to neuronal malfunction and eventually neuronal death. Molecular chaperone proteins have been shown to ameliorate some of the protein aggregation observed in the disease states. We are studying the effects of a newly identified molecular chaperone protein, BAG5 on aspects of protein regulation in cells to identify its role in normal cellular processes as well as in neurodegenerative disease. We will also be studying the effects of small domain structures within BAG5 for their effects on protein regulation individually and in combination.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Michael James Gortakowski (2007)

Investigating the n2 bonding interactions between aromatic molecules and transition metal centers

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Zev Joshua Greenberg (2016)

NSF 0942579 A natural approach to problem-based learning in the undergraduate curriculum: development of an interdisciplinary course, Chemical Analysis in Chemical Ecology.

This funding will support the creation of a new interdisciplinary course. The focus of the course will be to bring together students from the departments of chemistry and biology to learn about modern chemical methods of analysis used to study naturally-occurring chemicals with bioactive properties, including dietary compounds, toxins, pollutants, and chemical cues.

Term Funded:summer 2013
Professor: Amy Witter


Zev Joshua Greenberg (2016)

Determination of Nicotine in Cigars Wing RP-HPLC SPME GC/MS

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: Amy Witter


Jie Gu (2008)

Investigating the n2 bonding interactions between aromatic molecules and transition metal centers

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Christine Lynn Hannon (1990)

Hydrocarbon-base matrix FTIR studies

n/a

Term Funded:summer 1989
Professor: Cindy Samet


Christine Lynn Hannon (1990)

Hydrocarbon-base matrix FTIR studies

n/a

Term Funded:fall 1989
Professor: Cindy Samet


Christine Lynn Hannon (1990)

Hydrocarbon-base matrix FTIR studies

n/a

Term Funded:spring 1990
Professor: Cindy Samet


Erica Lynn Hartz (2011)

Synthesis via Green Chemistry and Characterization of Metal and Mixed Metal Anisotropic Nanoparticles for Assembly into SERS Substrates

Very small metallic particles with dimensions that can be measured in nanometers (1 nm = 1 x 10-9 m) can be synthesized by reacting metal ions with extracts of lemongrass and ginkgo leaves. We have produced nanoparticles composed of Au, Ag, and Cu (gold, silver, and copper) with interesting shapes and optical properties, and we will continue research into controlling synthetic conditions and nanoparticle properties. Anisotropic nanoparticles (non-spherical) of Au and Ag have potential applications with a very sensitive spectroscopy called Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). We wish to investigate the production of anisotripic Au and Ag nanoparticles via reduction with lemongrass and ginkgo for SERS applications. We have also found that reducing Cu ions with lemongrass produces fluorescent copper-containing particles. These particles are extremely small--only a few nanometers in diameter (SFR report Summer 2009)--and are difficult to thoroughly characterize. We will attempt more thorough characterization of these particles in terms of crystal structure, composition, and fluorescence.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Sarah St. Angelo


Erica Lynn Hartz (2011)

Synthesis of Bimetallic Collidal Triangles for Surface Enhanced Raman

The work proposed herein will investigate the possibility of using colloidal triangles with varying ratios and conformations of Au and Ag as substrates for surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). Over the course of the summer research term, my student and I will work closely to develop and refine colloidal synthesis strategies in order to produce particles with narrow distributions in size and shape. We will also manipulate the composition of our particles-primarily the relative amounts of gold and silver-by altering starting conditions and by investigating multistep or sequential reduction of the metals. The particles will be characterized by optical spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, electron microscopy, atomic absorption spectroscopy, and will be evaluated for surface enhancement of Raman scatter.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Sarah St. Angelo


Denise Raab Hess (1990)

Matrix Isolation Fourier-Transform Infrared Studies of Hydrocarbon-Ammonia Complexes

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1989
Professor: Cindy Samet


Denise Raab Hess (1990)

Matrix Isolation Fourier-Transform Infrared Studies of Hydrocarbon-Ammonia Complexes

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1989
Professor: Cindy Samet


Kyle R Hess (2008)

Infrared Matrix Isolation Studies of Meldrum's Acid with Nitrogen and Oxygen Bases

Fuding from R&D would support the continuation of hydrogen bonding studies that have been ongoing in my research laboratory for 19 years. In particular, I propose to study the hydrogen-bonded complex formed between Meldrum's Acid and nitrogen and oxygen bases using the matrix isolation technique combined with Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. In addition, molecular modeling will be used to support the experimental evidence for complex formation. Meldrum's Acid is interesting in its own right in that its unusually high acidity has puzzled researchers for years. The proposed work aims to understand how this unusual acidity correlates with the strength of the C-H---N(O) hydrogen bond. Most important, however, Meldrum's Acid will serve as a model for understanding hydrogen bonding in more complicated systems such as proteins and biomolecules, thereby moving my research into the realm of modeling complex biological systems.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Cindy Samet


Mark Alan Hilfiker (1995)

Infrared Matrix Isolations Studies of Hydrogen bonds Involving C-H bonds: Cyclopentadiene with Selected Bases

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1994
Professor: Cindy Samet


Mark Alan Hilfiker (1995)

Infrared Matrix Isolations Studies of Hydrogen bonds Involving C-H bonds: Cyclopentadiene with Selected Bases

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Cindy Samet


Russell Christopher Holz (2013)

Characterization and selection for association of the binding of BAG5 domains to potential molecular chemotherapeutic target, Hsp70

Targeted molecular therapies for cancer have revolutionized cancer treatment in the last twenty years. Potential molecular therapy target, Hsp70, has proved recalcitrant to small molecule inhibition. We propose to study the binding of Bcl-2 athanogene (BAG) domains to Hsp70 as a route to the development of a biological Hsp70 inhibitor. We plan to select through mutagenesis variants of BAG domains that bind more effectively to Hsp70 for the future design of multivalent Hsp70 inhibitor protein therapeutics.

Term Funded: 2011
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Erik Jonathan Humbert (1994)

New Methods for Generating Organometallic Species

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Michael Holden


Tomoko Virginia Jensen-Otsu (1999)

NSF Summer Seminar

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: Michael Holden


Tomoko Virginia Jensen-Otsu (1999)

NSF Summer Seminar

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: Michael Holden


Tomoko Virginia Jensen-Otsu (1999)

DOE - F&M Holden

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: Michael Holden


Jun Jiang (2012)

Electron Microscopy of Nanoparticles Synthesized via Green Chemistry

Electron Microscopy of Nanoparticles Synthesized via Green Chemistry

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Sarah St. Angelo


Philip Edward Joyce (1998)

An Organorhenium Approach to Amino Acids

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: Michael Holden


Matoli Vifansi Keely (2007)

Size-controlled synthesis of silver and gold nanoparticles using biomatter

The primary goal of this project was the development of methods to prepare nanoparticles of gold, silver and gold-silver alloys of predictable size and shape using plant matter as the reducing and capping agent in an environmentally-friendly or green process. A longer term goal was to grow these nanoparticles on glass in order to take advantage of their optical properties in sensor technology. Although this latter goal remains to be completed, we have been able to prepare nanoparticles of varying size and shape using extracts of the Asian herb, lemon grass, and the more common herb, basil.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: David Crouch


Richard Thomas Keiser (1990)

Kinetic and Equilibrium Studies of Isotope Exchange on the Hypophosphite Anion Using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1988
Professor: Gerald Roper


Margaret Mintz Kelly (2000)

Formal Synthesis of O-Methyljoubertiamine

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Michael Holden


Danielle Marie Klinger (2002)

Electrochemical Investigations of Polysaccharide Metal Interactions in Aqueous Solutions

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Amy Witter


Douglas Allan Klinger (1990)

Kinetic and Equilibrium Studies of Base-catalyzed Deuterium Exchange on the Hypophosphite Anion

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1989
Professor: Gerald Roper


Susan LaRusse Eckert (1994)

The Role of Thrombospondin in Proteglycan Processing

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Nancy Devino


Amanda Elizabeth Leicht (2002)

Desolvation Kinetics of the CpRe(CO)3(THF) (THF=tetrahydrofuran) Complex

When UV light interacts with the CpRe (CO)3 (Cp = C5H5) molecule in solution, one Re-CO bond is broken resulting in the generation of the CpRe (CO)2 complex. This complex is extremely reactive and the site vacated by the CO ligand is rapidly taken up by the solvent molecule. Before the resulting CpRe (CO)2S (S=solvent) species can participate in a chemical reaction, it is necessary to displace the solvent molecule from the E center. We will investigate the mechanism by which the solvent molecule is replaced by an incoming two electron donor ligand. In addition to determining the mechanism of this reaction, we will also attempt to obtain an estimate of the Re-solvent bond energy by studying the reaction at several temperatires.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Yike Li (2014)

Matrix Isolation Studies

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: Cindy Samet


Yike Li (2014)

Matrix and Polymer Soft-Landing Isolation Studies

This summer, we will continue the hydrogen-bonding studies involving C-H---N and C-H---O linkages (the dashed line represents a hydrogen bond) that have been ongoing in my laboratory for the past 25 years. This work, however, represents a new direction in my research, one that began when we moved into Rector. In particular, the proposed studies, which involve hydrogen-bonding "matrix-isolated" molecules onto a polymer surface, provide a key link between my field of matrix isolation and the world of nanotechnology. The work I have completed over these past few years resulted in a very exciting publication (January 2012), which describes this new technique, titled "polymer soft-landing," that my students and I have pioneered. As stated in the paper, this work is "an exciting first step into using the matrix isolation laboratory to probe the building of nanostructures."

Term Funded:summer 2013
Professor: Cindy Samet


Jennifer Lynn Majchrzak (2004)

Application of Ionic Liquids to the Deprotection of Silyl Ethers.

That project which Jenn will focus on for the remainder of her time as a Beckman Scholar is the synthesis of cyclopropane-containing adrenergic agents. Although the synthetic scheme is relatively straightforward, the sequence of steps and the precise conditions for each of those steps needed to be worked out. Jenn focused on three specific steps: the Suzuki coupling needed to build the biaryl fragment of the target, the cyclopropanation reaction needed to convert an alkene into the desired cyclopropyl group and the formation of the imidazoline ring required for binding to the adrenergic receptor. By the end of the summer, Jenn had determined that cyclopropanation was best achieved through a "cycling" of the reaction mixture through multiple reactions. Since the reaction does not go to completion and the reactant alkene is nearly impossible to separate from the cyclopropanated product, the best result was gained by exposing the a quantity of alkene to diazomethane and Pd(II) catalyst three times. She also found conditions that will allow the coupling of arylboronic acid to bromobenzaldehyde in high yield. The imidazoline formation is the last piece of the puzzle and when that reaction is developed, Jenn should be able to begin preparing some of the analogs. At this stage of the project, it is difficult to determine how her lab experience as a Beckman Scholar will impact Jenn's future. Clearly, she is already thinking like a scientist, asking questions and beginning to come up with her own ideas about reactions such as why they sometimes fail and developing possible solutions to make them work. She is performing her own literature searches. Jenn has also grown considerably in the lab. She has become quite adept at separating the components of complex mixtures and handling relatively sensitive reagents.

Term Funded:Year 2003
Professor: David Crouch


Gerard Steven Mattei (2012)

Reactivity of a Distamycin-Copper Conjugate with DNA

The goal of this project is to evaluate the chemical reactivity of an artificial nuclease designed to selectively bind to and cleave DNA. The compound of interest contains a distamycin DNA binding domain tethered to a copper(II)-containing catalytic domain. Preliminary reactivity studies with plasmid DNA will allow for evaluation of the DNA binding and cleavage abilities of the distamycin-copper conjugate. These studies will be followed by cleavage assays using 32P-radiolabeled oligonucleotides to determine the actual site of cleavage and possible mechanisms for the reaction. Finally, the compound will undergo cytoxicity assays with bacterial and mammalian cells. These tests will assess cellular uptake of the compound as well as its degree of interaction with DNA inside cells. Analyses of this type will ideally lead to a greater understanding of the factors responsible oxidative damage to DNA by copper and should aid in the design of new compounds with pharmaceutical potential.

Term Funded: 2011
Professor: Kristi Humphreys


Benjamin Kyle Mezick (2005)

Investigating the Strangth and Reactivity of the Re-MenTHF Bond

This proposal is centered around a study of the factors that influence the strength and reactivity of weak metal-solvent bonds. The LnRe-MenTHF complexes will be generated photochemically and the strength of the resulting Re-MenTHF bond will be investigated by substitution kinetics. The weakly bound MenTHF solvent molecule will be displaced from the Re center by acetonitrile and the energetics of this substitution reaction is expected to yield insights into the strength of the Re-MenTHF interaction. The effect of systematically varying the donor and steric properties of the MenTHF ligand (by increasing n) on the strength of the Re-MenTHF bond will be studied. The influence of the steric and electronic properties of the metal on the strength of this interaction will be investigated by varying the ligands bound to the Re center. It is expected that the results of this experiment will allow us to better understand the role of the metal-solvent bond in important chemical reactions.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Benjamin Kyle Mezick (2005)

Investigating the Strangth and Reactivity of the Re-MenTHF Bond

This proposal is centered around a study of the factors that influence the strength and reactivity of weak metal-solvent bonds. The LnRe-MenTHF complexes will be generated photochemically and the strength of the resulting Re-MenTHF bond will be investigated by substitution kinetics. The weakly bound MenTHF solvent molecule will be displaced from the Re center by acetonitrile and the energetics of this substitution reaction is expected to yield insights into the strength of the Re-MenTHF interaction. The effect of systematically varying the donor and steric properties of the MenTHF ligand (by increasing n) on the strength of the Re-MenTHF bond will be studied. The influence of the steric and electronic properties of the metal on the strength of this interaction will be investigated by varying the ligands bound to the Re center. It is expected that the results of this experiment will allow us to better understand the role of the metal-solvent bond in important chemical reactions.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Kim E Mooney (1999)

A Mechanistic Investigation of the Reaction between Metal Carbonyls and Diazoesters

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Erin Ross Mysak (2001)

NSF 9501428 Infrared Matrix Isolation Studies of Cyclic Hydrocarbons with Nitrogen and Oxygen Bases

Hydrocarbon-base matrix FTIR studies

Term Funded:Fall 1998
Professor: Cindy Samet


Erin Ross Mysak (2001)

Infrared Matrix Isolation Studies of Hydrogen Bonds involving C-H Bonds

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Cindy Samet


Erin Ross Mysak (2001)

NSF 9501428 Infrared Matrix Isolation Studies of Cyclic Hydrocarbons with Nitrogen and Oxygen Bases

Hydrocarbon-base matrix FTIR studies

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Cindy Samet


Minh Huu Nguyen (2011)

Conodoguinet Creek and Diesel Exhaust Markers

Conodoguinet Creek and Diesel Exhaust Markers

Term Funded:Spring 2011
Professor: Amy Witter


Minh Huu Nguyen (2011)

Investigating the utility of nitro-PAHs and diesel exhaust markers in sediments from the Conodoguinet Creek, Cumberland County, PA

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Amy Witter


Minh Huu Nguyen (2011)

Assembling CHEM 131, 132, and 141 Labs for the 09-10 Academic Year

Work with three professors in Chemistry to develop laboratory courses in Chemistry 131, 132, and 141. Witter: Chemistry 141 (Accelerated General Chemistry) during Fall 2009; Crouch: develop some new experiments for the organic chemistry sequence; Humphreys: development of laboratory experiments for the new general chemistry sequence, CHEM 131 and CHEM 132

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Amy Witter


Amy Grunbeck Perea (2007)

The Transition Metal-Arene Bond: A Laxer Flash Photolysis Study

I am requesting supplemental funding for this project that is primarily supported through a grant from the American Chemical Society (PRF). As indicated on the PRF budget sheet, I will be hiring two students to conduct research with me this summer. Both will be responsible for setting up the experiment, acquiring and then analyzing the data. I will expect them to prepare a poster detailing the results and with the budgeted travel funds, we will present the results at a national American Chemical Society meeting. In the past, students have found that the projects they have worked on have been beneficial to their growth as scientists. The students are exposed to experiments that involve the use of equipment and techniques that are not formally introduced in the classroom and associated labs.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Amy Grunbeck Perea (2007)

Investigating the n2 bonding interactions between aromatic molecules and transition metal centers

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Emily Ann Peterpaul (2013)

Synthesis and Reactivity of Copper Nucleases

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Kristi Humphreys


Emily Ann Peterpaul (2013)

Reactivity of a Distamycin-Copper Conjugate with DNA

The goal of this project is to evaluate the chemical reactivity of an artificial nuclease designed to selectively bind to and cleave DNA. The compound of interest contains a distamycin DNA binding domain tethered to a copper(II)-containing catalytic domain. Preliminary reactivity studies with plasmid DNA will allow for evaluation of the DNA binding and cleavage abilities of the distamycin-copper conjugate. These studies will be followed by cleavage assays using 32P-radiolabeled oligonucleotides to determine the actual site of cleavage and possible mechanisms for the reaction. Finally, the compound will undergo cytoxicity assays with bacterial and mammalian cells. These tests will assess cellular uptake of the compound as well as its degree of interaction with DNA inside cells. Analyses of this type will ideally lead to a greater understanding of the factors responsible oxidative damage to DNA by copper and should aid in the design of new compounds with pharmaceutical potential.

Term Funded: 2011
Professor: Kristi Humphreys


Andrew John Piefer (1995)

New Oxidations Leading to Enantiomerically Pure Products

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Scott Miller


Jamie McNeil Rausch (1989)

Computer Interfacing for Improved Laboratory Instrumentation

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1988
Professor: Robert Leyon


Karina Menconi Reed (2004)

Application of Ionic Liquids to the Deprotection of Silyl Ethers.

Deprotection of silyl ethers remains an important reaction in synthetic chemistry. One problem with protection/deprotection protocols is the addition of two steps to any reaction sequence. In industrial settings, this represents a problem in terms of expense and the handling of waste streams. Thus, the development of reagents that are non-toxic and reusable is highly desired. One possible solution is the use of ionic liquids. Ionic liquids are organic compounds which consist of a positive and negative ion and possess an unusual capacity for dissolving normally incompatible reactants. In recent years, this property has been used increasingly in organic synthesis with the added advantage that the ionic liquid can be easily separated from the reaction mixture, purified and reused. Thus, ionic liquids are growing in popularity in the chemical industry. Recently, a pair of ionic liquids that contain an acidic residue was described. These "combination" compounds can serve as both reagent and solvent. And, like other ionic liquids, they are reusable. This project proposes an examination of the potential application of acidic ionic liquids to the problem of desilylation of silyl-protected alcohols. We will investigate whether these acids can effect desilylation, whether selectivity is possible and whether the ionic liquids can be reused and, if so, the effectiveness of the recycled reagent.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: David Crouch


Karina Menconi Reed (2004)

Application of Ionic Liquids to the Deprotection of Silyl Ethers.

Deprotection of silyl ethers remains an important reaction in synthetic chemistry. One problem with protection/deprotection protocols is the addition of two steps to any reaction sequence. In industrial settings, this represents a problem in terms of expense and the handling of waste streams. Thus, the development of reagents that are non-toxic and reusable is highly desired. One possible solution is the use of ionic liquids. Ionic liquids are organic compounds which consist of a positive and negative ion and possess an unusual capacity for dissolving normally incompatible reactants. In recent years, this property has been used increasingly in organic synthesis with the added advantage that the ionic liquid can be easily separated from the reaction mixture, purified and reused. Thus, ionic liquids are growing in popularity in the chemical industry. Recently, a pair of ionic liquids that contain an acidic residue was described. These "combination" compounds can serve as both reagent and solvent. And, like other ionic liquids, they are reusable. This project proposes an examination of the potential application of acidic ionic liquids to the problem of desilylation of silyl-protected alcohols. We will investigate whether these acids can effect desilylation, whether selectivity is possible and whether the ionic liquids can be reused and, if so, the effectiveness of the recycled reagent.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: David Crouch


Nathaniel Marc Rickles (1991)

The Interaction between Theophylline and Antipyrine

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1989
Professor: Cheryl Perrota


James August Ridenour (2014)

Assessing the Sonolytic Denaturation of the Enzyme Pepsin A

Medical procedures such as endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) use high frequency sound waves to produce images. To understand potential molecular effects of ultrasound, aqueous pepsin A (from porcine gastric mucosa) aqueous solutions will be sonicated in an ultrasonic bath. The data obtained will be used to assess pepsin degradation and to determine reactions with radicals (generated by the thermally breakdown of water during sonication) and/or hydrodynamic sheer stress resulting from acoustic cavitation are the principal causes of degradation. Calorimetry, biochemical, and spectroscopic techniques will be used to assess the protein structure and function changes as a function of sonication time.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Keith Krise


Jeffrey M Rodgers (2010)

Infrared Matrix Isolation Studies of the Hydrogen Bonding Involved in Layer-by-Layer Assembly of Nanoparticles: Pyridine as a Hydrogen Bond Acceptor

Funding from R&D would support the continuation of hydrogen bonding studies that have been ongoing in my research laboratory for 20 years. In particular, I propose to study hydrogen- bonding interactions that are becoming important in the field of nanotechnology. In particular, the hydrogen bond formed between an organic acid (called a carboxylic acid) and an organic base (pyridine) is currently being used in the layer-by-layer assembly of monolayers containing nanoparticles. Such hydrogen bonding interactions are not well characterized, and thus scientists in the field of nanotechnology can learn much from the wealth of information that the matrix isolation technique can yield about the nature and strength of this important hydrogen bond.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Cindy Samet


Jeffrey M Rodgers (2010)

SACP--Investigating the diversity of glycosylation in marine bacteria

Many secreted and cell-surface proteins in mammals and bacteria are glycoproteins. Glycoproteins are proteins in which multiple sugar residues are covalently attached to the protein backbone through an asparagine or serine residue. Because sugar attachment often occurs through a nitrogen atom, the sugars are referred to as N-linked glycans. The structures of N-linked glycans are complex and as a result, their biological functions were largely ignored until recently. This project involves teaching two undergraduates the analytical methods for characterizing N-linked glycans in a model organism, marine bacteria. Marine bacteria are chosen because they grow quickly, and because I have an on-going collaboration with a colleague who is an expert in marine microbiology. Additionally, their genomes have recently been sequenced, allowing us to ask broader questions based on preliminary results from these studies.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Amy Witter


Jeffrey M Rodgers (2010)

High Performance Liquid Chromatograph with fluorescence detection studies

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Amy Witter


Robert Michael Sansevere (2014)

Microwave Organic Synthesis

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: R. David Crouch


Michael Joseph Scanish (2001)

Desolvation Kinetics of the CpRe(CO)2S(S=Solvent) complex: A Laser Flash Photolysis Study

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Michael Joseph Scanish (2001)

Determination of the nature of the oxidizing species generated by the Fenton reaction and its rate and mechanism of formation in aqueous and non-aqueous media.

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Katrina Louise Schulberg (2001)

The Rate of Methoxide Addition of Substituted (cyclopentadienyliron)arenes

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Michael Holden


Andrew Ford Schwerin (2004)

Studies Towards the Synthesis of Metal-based Anti-malarial agents

Over the course of the last decade, a new subdiscipline of chemistry has emerged. This new field, given the name bioorganometallic chemistry, deals with the study of the biological chemistry of compounds containing metal carbon bonds. A number of systems have been studied, including an iron-containing tamoxifen derivative, envisioned as a possible treatment for breast cancer; a triosmium carbonyl-based cluster that has shown to be a useful telomerase inhibitor and technicium carbonyl-based compounds that are useful in biological imaging processes. Another interesting observation has been the discovery of ferrocenyl-based anti-malarial agents. Several different anti-malarial compounds have been subjected to conditions in which a fragment of the carbon backbone has been replaced by a ferrocene (organoiron) moiety. A number of these organometallic species have demonstrated an enhanced anti-malarial activity. The proposal details a project in which studies will be undertaken to move towards the synthesis of a metal-based derivative of the anti-malarial agent isoprophyl[(4-chlorophenyl)amino]iminomethylcarbamimidate.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Michael Holden


Andrew Ford Schwerin (2004)

Studies Towards the Synthesis of Metal-based Anti-malarial agents

Over the course of the last decade, a new subdiscipline of chemistry has emerged. This new field, given the name bioorganometallic chemistry, deals with the study of the biological chemistry of compounds containing metal carbon bonds. A number of systems have been studied, including an iron-containing tamoxifen derivative, envisioned as a possible treatment for breast cancer; a triosmium carbonyl-based cluster that has shown to be a useful telomerase inhibitor and technicium carbonyl-based compounds that are useful in biological imaging processes. Another interesting observation has been the discovery of ferrocenyl-based anti-malarial agents. Several different anti-malarial compounds have been subjected to conditions in which a fragment of the carbon backbone has been replaced by a ferrocene (organoiron) moiety. A number of these organometallic species have demonstrated an enhanced anti-malarial activity. The proposal details a project in which studies will be undertaken to move towards the synthesis of a metal-based derivative of the anti-malarial agent isoprophyl[(4-chlorophenyl)amino]iminomethylcarbamimidate.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Michael Holden


Denise Marie Sharbaugh (2003)

Effects of Nutrient limitation on phytoplankton-derived organic matter and consequences for bacterial community structure (Nutrient limitation effects on phytoplankton-derived organic carbon composition in the ocean)

Iron and/or nitrogen limitation constrains the amount of carbon fixed by phytoplankton over most of the surface ocean. A large fraction of this carbon is released into the dissolved organic pool, where it can either be quickly utilized by the microbial community, or stored in the vast oceanic reservoir of refractory dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Consequently, both nutrient limitation and DOC production are critically important components of marine carbon cycles. However, little is known about the relationship between these processes-that is, how iron and nitrogen limitation affect the composition and fate of phytoplankton-derived DOC. This proposal describes research that will explore the linkage between Fe and N limitation, and the composition of extracellular organic carbon released by phytoplankton. Our preliminary data demonstrate that Fe- and N-limited phytoplankton release dissolved carbohydrates with different monosaccharide compositions from those produced by nutrient-replete cells. These changes in phytoplankton exudate composition with Fe and N limitation have potentially large implications for bacterial growth and diversity. This project will be a collaborative partnership between the undergraduate analytical chemistry group of PI Witter, and the graduate biogeochemical and biological oceanography lab of PI Hutchins. The aim of this project is to begin to understand how phytoplankton iron and nitrogen limitation influence the flux and quality of labile DOM entering the microbial food web. This is a research area that remains virtually unexplored, despite the obvious potential consequences for biological production and community structure in coastal and oligotrophic regimes, and for carbon biogeochemistry throughout the world's oceans.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Amy Witter


Denise Marie Sharbaugh (2003)

Electrochemical Investigations of polysaccharide-metal interactions in aqueous systems

The influence of the trace nutrient iron on bacterial growth and metabolism will be studied using high performance liquid chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPLC-PAD). Metabolic products and their concentrations will be measured and should allow for a qualitative and quantitative assessment of nutrient availability on carbon production in aquatic systems.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Amy Witter


Denise Marie Sharbaugh (2003)

Electrochemical Investigations of polysaccharide-metal interactions in aqueous systems

The influence of the trace nutrient iron on bacterial growth and metabolism will be studied using high performance liquid chromatography with pulsed amperometric detection (HPLC-PAD). Metabolic products and their concentrations will be measured and should allow for a qualitative and quantitative assessment of nutrient availability on carbon production in aquatic systems.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Amy Witter


Denise Marie Sharbaugh (2003)

Effects of Nutrient limitation on phytoplankton-derived organic matter and consequences for bacterial community structure (Nutrient limitation effects on phytoplankton-derived organic carbon composition in the ocean)

Iron and/or nitrogen limitation constrains the amount of carbon fixed by phytoplankton over most of the surface ocean. A large fraction of this carbon is released into the dissolved organic pool, where it can either be quickly utilized by the microbial community, or stored in the vast oceanic reservoir of refractory dissolved organic carbon (DOC). Consequently, both nutrient limitation and DOC production are critically important components of marine carbon cycles. However, little is known about the relationship between these processes-that is, how iron and nitrogen limitation affect the composition and fate of phytoplankton-derived DOC. This proposal describes research that will explore the linkage between Fe and N limitation, and the composition of extracellular organic carbon released by phytoplankton. Our preliminary data demonstrate that Fe- and N-limited phytoplankton release dissolved carbohydrates with different monosaccharide compositions from those produced by nutrient-replete cells. These changes in phytoplankton exudate composition with Fe and N limitation have potentially large implications for bacterial growth and diversity. This project will be a collaborative partnership between the undergraduate analytical chemistry group of PI Witter, and the graduate biogeochemical and biological oceanography lab of PI Hutchins. The aim of this project is to begin to understand how phytoplankton iron and nitrogen limitation influence the flux and quality of labile DOM entering the microbial food web. This is a research area that remains virtually unexplored, despite the obvious potential consequences for biological production and community structure in coastal and oligotrophic regimes, and for carbon biogeochemistry throughout the world's oceans.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Amy Witter


Denise Marie Sharbaugh (2003)

Electrochemical Investigations of Polysaccharide Metal Interactions in Aqueous Solutions

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Amy Witter


Denise Marie Sharbaugh (2003)

Electrochemical Investigations of Polysaccharide Metal Interactions in Aqueous Solutions

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Amy Witter


Amelia Rose Shillingsburg (1996)

A New Approach to the Asymmetric Baylis-Hillman Reaction

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1995
Professor: David Crouch


Yurina Shim (2009)

Investigating the Interactions of Mononuclear Copper Compounds with Biomolecules

Several platinum and ruthenium metal complexes are in use clinically or undergoing testing as anticancer agents. The development of new compounds incorporating metals such as copper will increase treatment options and mitigate the effects of tumor cell resistance to current drugs. Two copper complexes have been identified that could advance this goal, but additional research is necessary to elucidate and capitalize on the source of their unique activities. Both complexes possess a critical, but poorly understood, ability to recognize and bind to specific regions on DNA. This proposal aims to investigate the interactions of small copper complexes with biomolecules such as DNA and serum proteins to gain an understanding of the fate of copper-based anticancer drugs during transport in the blood and at their final destination within tumor cells.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Kristi Humphreys


Myungsun Shin (2014)

Identification of Proteins Modified by Parthenolide Derivatives in Leukemia Cells

Some chemotherapeutic drugs are natural products of plants or microorganisms, such as taxol from the yew tree. Parthenolide is a molecule made by the plant, feverfew that has been shown to selectively kill leukemia stem cells; however, its mode of action is not fully understood. We have synthesized derivatives of parthenolide and we will use these derivatives to identify the proteins in leukemia cells targeted by this molecule. Through these experiments, we will gain an understanding of the action of parthenolide in biological systems and its potential targets in leukemic stem cells. It is the interaction with potential targets that gives rise to the potency of parthenolide and parthenolide derivatives as anti-cancer agents.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Myungsun Shin (2014)

Investigation of the cellular action of the natural product, parthenolide.

Parthenolide, a natural product from the plant feverfew, has well documented chemotherapeutic properties. Water-soluble derivatives of parthenolide are currently undergoing clinical trials for treatment of leukemia. Despite these successes, the mechanism by which parthenolide and its derivatives interfere with celular processes in cancer cells is not well understood. Using derivatives of parthenolide synthesized in the lab, we plan to identify the action of parthenolide that contributes to its efficacy as a chemotherapeutic. We will use a chemoselective ligation reaction to label cellular targets of the drug with an affinity tag, biotin for subsequent detection and purification. Further understanding of the mecahnism of parthenolide action will pave the way for development of similar chemotherapeutic agents.

Term Funded:Fall 2011
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Myungsun Shin (2014)

Protein Modification by Parthenolide Derivatives

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Myungsun Shin (2014)

Exploring the mechanism of action of the anti-leukemic drug, parthenolide

Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) occurs in about 1 out of 250,000 people and long-term survival with AML is poor. This project will study how a potential anti-leukemia therapeutic, parthenolide, interacts with cells and proteins. We will use compounds derived from parthenolide to identify the components of the original molecule that are required to maintain anti-leukemia activity. We will also identify the patterns of proteins within leukemia cells that are modified by parthenolide and our synthesized derivatives using activity-based protein profiling. Understanding how the component parts of parthenolide affect its anti-leukemic properties and interact with proteins in cancer cells can guide the development of new cancer therapeutics.

Term Funded: 2011
Professor: Rebecca Connor


Natalie Sue Shwaish (2006)

Ferrocenyl Analogs of Biologically Active Compounds

The proposed research encompasses a rather wide spectrum of chemistry with a goal of discovering one or several practical syntheses of biologically interesting compounds incorporating a ferrocenyl fragment. A primary area of interest is the synthesis of a ferrocenyl analogue of the anti-malarial agent proguanil. Recently, an emerging area of malaria research has been spawned by the discovery of ferrocenyl-based anti-malarial agents. Several different anti-malarial compounds have been subjected to conditions in which a fragment of the carbon backbone has been replaced by a ferrocene moiety. A number of these organometallic species have demonstrated an enhanced anti-malarial activity.

Term Funded:Year 2006
Professor: Michael Holden


Natalie Sue Shwaish (2006)

Ferrocenyl Analogs of Biologically Active Compounds

The proposed research encompasses a rather wide spectrum of chemistry with a goal of discovering one or several practical syntheses of biologically interesting compounds incorporating a ferrocenyl fragment. A primary area of interest is the synthesis of a ferrocenyl analogue of the anti-malarial agent proguanil. Recently, an emerging area of malaria research has been spawned by the discovery of ferrocenyl-based anti-malarial agents. Several different anti-malarial compounds have been subjected to conditions in which a fragment of the carbon backbone has been replaced by a ferrocene moiety. A number of these organometallic species have demonstrated an enhanced anti-malarial activity.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Michael Holden


Natalie Sue Shwaish (2006)

Ferrocenyl Analogs of Biologically Active Compounds

The proposed research encompasses a rather wide spectrum of chemistry with a goal of discovering one or several practical syntheses of biologically interesting compounds incorporating a ferrocenyl fragment. A primary area of interest is the synthesis of a ferrocenyl analogue of the anti-malarial agent proguanil. Recently, an emerging area of malaria research has been spawned by the discovery of ferrocenyl-based anti-malarial agents. Several different anti-malarial compounds have been subjected to conditions in which a fragment of the carbon backbone has been replaced by a ferrocene moiety. A number of these organometallic species have demonstrated an enhanced anti-malarial activity.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Michael Holden


Natalie Sue Shwaish (2006)

Ferrocenyl Analogs of Biologically Active Compounds

The proposed research encompasses a rather wide spectrum of chemistry with a goal of discovering one or several practical syntheses of biologically interesting compounds incorporating a ferrocenyl fragment. A primary area of interest is the synthesis of a ferrocenyl analogue of the anti-malarial agent proguanil. Recently, an emerging area of malaria research has been spawned by the discovery of ferrocenyl-based anti-malarial agents. Several different anti-malarial compounds have been subjected to conditions in which a fragment of the carbon backbone has been replaced by a ferrocene moiety. A number of these organometallic species have demonstrated an enhanced anti-malarial activity.

Term Funded:Year 2006
Professor: Michael Holden


Natalie Sue Shwaish (2006)

Ferrocenyl Analogs of Biologically Active Compounds

The proposed research encompasses a rather wide spectrum of chemistry with a goal of discovering one or several practical syntheses of biologically interesting compounds incorporating a ferrocenyl fragment. A primary area of interest is the synthesis of a ferrocenyl analogue of the anti-malarial agent proguanil. Recently, an emerging area of malaria research has been spawned by the discovery of ferrocenyl-based anti-malarial agents. Several different anti-malarial compounds have been subjected to conditions in which a fragment of the carbon backbone has been replaced by a ferrocene moiety. A number of these organometallic species have demonstrated an enhanced anti-malarial activity.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Michael Holden


Natalie Sue Shwaish (2006)

Studies Towards the Synthesis of Metal-based Anti-malarial agents

Over the course of the last decade, a new subdiscipline of chemistry has emerged. This new field, given the name bioorganometallic chemistry, deals with the study of the biological chemistry of compounds containing metal carbon bonds. A number of systems have been studied, including an iron-containing tamoxifen derivative, envisioned as a possible treatment for breast cancer; a triosmium carbonyl-based cluster that has shown to be a useful telomerase inhibitor and technicium carbonyl-based compounds that are useful in biological imaging processes. Another interesting observation has been the discovery of ferrocenyl-based anti-malarial agents. Several different anti-malarial compounds have been subjected to conditions in which a fragment of the carbon backbone has been replaced by a ferrocene (organoiron) moiety. A number of these organometallic species have demonstrated an enhanced anti-malarial activity. The proposal details a project in which studies will be undertaken to continue towards the synthesis of a metal-based derivative of the anti-malarial agent isopropyl [(4-chlorophenyl)amino]iminomethylcarbamimidate. To further our knowledge in this new field, a new direction of bioorganometallic chemistry will be investigated, namely the synthesis of ferrocenyl analogs of the biologically active dihydropyridines.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Michael Holden


Natalie Sue Shwaish (2006)

Ferrocenyl Analogs of Biologically Active Compounds

The proposed research encompasses a rather wide spectrum of chemistry with a goal of discovering one or several practical syntheses of biologically interesting compounds incorporating a ferrocenyl fragment. A primary area of interest is the synthesis of a ferrocenyl analogue of the anti-malarial agent proguanil. Recently, an emerging area of malaria research has been spawned by the discovery of ferrocenyl-based anti-malarial agents. Several different anti-malarial compounds have been subjected to conditions in which a fragment of the carbon backbone has been replaced by a ferrocene moiety. A number of these organometallic species have demonstrated an enhanced anti-malarial activity.

Term Funded:Year 2006
Professor: Michael Holden


Natalie Sue Shwaish (2006)

Ferrocenyl Analogs of Biologically Active Compounds

The proposed research encompasses a rather wide spectrum of chemistry with a goal of discovering one or several practical syntheses of biologically interesting compounds incorporating a ferrocenyl fragment. A primary area of interest is the synthesis of a ferrocenyl analogue of the anti-malarial agent proguanil. Recently, an emerging area of malaria research has been spawned by the discovery of ferrocenyl-based anti-malarial agents. Several different anti-malarial compounds have been subjected to conditions in which a fragment of the carbon backbone has been replaced by a ferrocene moiety. A number of these organometallic species have demonstrated an enhanced anti-malarial activity.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Michael Holden


Natalie Sue Shwaish (2006)

Ferrocenyl Analogs of Biologically Active Compounds

The proposed research encompasses a rather wide spectrum of chemistry with a goal of discovering one or several practical syntheses of biologically interesting compounds incorporating a ferrocenyl fragment. A primary area of interest is the synthesis of a ferrocenyl analogue of the anti-malarial agent proguanil. Recently, an emerging area of malaria research has been spawned by the discovery of ferrocenyl-based anti-malarial agents. Several different anti-malarial compounds have been subjected to conditions in which a fragment of the carbon backbone has been replaced by a ferrocene moiety. A number of these organometallic species have demonstrated an enhanced anti-malarial activity.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Michael Holden


Natalie Sue Shwaish (2006)

Ferrocenyl Analogs of Biologically Active Compounds

The proposed research encompasses a rather wide spectrum of chemistry with a goal of discovering one or several practical syntheses of biologically interesting compounds incorporating a ferrocenyl fragment. A primary area of interest is the synthesis of a ferrocenyl analogue of the anti-malarial agent proguanil. Recently, an emerging area of malaria research has been spawned by the discovery of ferrocenyl-based anti-malarial agents. Several different anti-malarial compounds have been subjected to conditions in which a fragment of the carbon backbone has been replaced by a ferrocene moiety. A number of these organometallic species have demonstrated an enhanced anti-malarial activity.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Michael Holden


Natalie Sue Shwaish (2006)

Studies Towards the Synthesis of Metal-based Anti-malarial agents

Over the course of the last decade, a new subdiscipline of chemistry has emerged. This new field, given the name bioorganometallic chemistry, deals with the study of the biological chemistry of compounds containing metal carbon bonds. A number of systems have been studied, including an iron-containing tamoxifen derivative, envisioned as a possible treatment for breast cancer; a triosmium carbonyl-based cluster that has shown to be a useful telomerase inhibitor and technicium carbonyl-based compounds that are useful in biological imaging processes. Another interesting observation has been the discovery of ferrocenyl-based anti-malarial agents. Several different anti-malarial compounds have been subjected to conditions in which a fragment of the carbon backbone has been replaced by a ferrocene (organoiron) moiety. A number of these organometallic species have demonstrated an enhanced anti-malarial activity. The proposal details a project in which studies will be undertaken to continue towards the synthesis of a metal-based derivative of the anti-malarial agent isopropyl [(4-chlorophenyl)amino]iminomethylcarbamimidate. To further our knowledge in this new field, a new direction of bioorganometallic chemistry will be investigated, namely the synthesis of ferrocenyl analogs of the biologically active dihydropyridines.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Michael Holden


Samuel Robert Silvershein (2014)

Mechanisms of CD14 Expression

CD14 is an immune system cellular receptor that plays a critical role in the defense against invading pathogens. It binds primarily to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), a component of the outer wall of Gram negative bacteria. CD14 is found as two protein isoforms: a membrane protein (mCD14) and a soluble serum protein (sCD14). Aberrant expression of sCD14 has been associated with a number of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Therefore, a deeper mechanistic understanding of CD14 expression and release from the cell is critical to understand its contribution to inflammatory diseases. Previous work has shown that treatment of immune cells with lovastatin, a drug primarily prescribed for cardiovascular disease that has anti-inflammatory properties, increases the expression of mCD14 while decreasing the release of sCD14 following LPS stimulation. Since lovastatin modulates CD14 expression, this project aims to use this drug as a tool to uncover novel mechanisms of this process.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Tiffany Frey


Jessica Kristine Sinchi (2014)

NSF 085670 STEP Program at Dickinson College

Through this program, Dickinson intends to recruit and matriculate a "science posse" cohort in each of three years beginning in the fall of 2009. The science posse program will have three major components: 1) a four-week summer pre-matriculation program in which students will participate in lab research and a series of enrichment workshops in chemistry and mathematics; 2) a second eight-week summer of research with Dickinson faculty members using our successful model of student/faculty research; and 3) a capstone eight-week summer research experience at off-campus laboratories in major research universities. The program will provide a strong mentoring experience for underrepresented students to support their pursuit of a science major. The successful implementation of this plan will result in the establishment of a cohort of science major role models for future students among our underrepresented minority groups. Results of the program will be disseminated widely within the broader scientific education community so that they may serve as a model for other institutions.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor:


Brooke Leigh Slaton (1998)

DOE - F&M Holden

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1995
Professor: Michael Holden


Rachel Whitehead Spector (1997)

Synthetic Organometallic Chemistry

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1995
Professor: Michael Holden


Rachel Whitehead Spector (1997)

Synthetic Organometallic Chemistry

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1995
Professor: Michael Holden


Matthew John Stachowiak (2005)

Molecular characterization of phytoplankton-derived extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) produced under nutrient-limited conditions

Phytoplankton nutrient limitation has been a major focus of oceanographic research for many years. Recent evidence suggests that macronutrients such as nitrate and phosphate, and micronutrients such as iron, may limit CO2 fixation over large areas of the world's oceans. Nutrients exert both direct and indirect effects in marine systems. Direct effects include lower growth rates, lower photosynthetic efficiencies, and smaller cell sizes. Indirect effects may include biochemically-induced changes to the organic carbon byproducts of CO2 fixation. For example, nutrient limitation may affect the composition and quantity of phytoplankton-derived exudates, called extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which may change its physical-chemical behavior. Because marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is one of the largest storage reservoirs of carbon on earth, and EPS is a major component of the DOC pool, these results have important implications for the field of marine geochemistry. We propose to test this hypothesis by growing phytoplankton under nutrient-replete and nutrient-limited conditions, and characterizing the physical and chemical properties of the resulting EPS. Extracellular polymers will be chemically characterized using both bulk (i.e. colorimetric) and molecular (i.e. anion-exhange HPLC-IPAD) methods. Physical-chemical properties of phytoplankton-derived organic matter grown under these two nutrient regimes will then be examined using three techniques: 1) size-exclusion chromatography; 2) metal binding assays; and 3) bioassays with marine bacteria. A broader implication of this work is to examine the "molecular packaging" of atmospheric CO2 that is sequestered in marine systems.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Amy Witter


Matthew John Stachowiak (2005)

Flame atomic absorption spectrometer studies

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Amy Witter


Megan Ann Stekla (2015)

Characterization of a Mitochondrial-Associated Novel Myosin (MYO19)

Mitochondria are organelles that play a critical role in cellular energy metabolism. They are often referred to as "cellular power plants" because they generate adenosine triphosphate (ATP), which is used as a source of chemical energy. In addition to ATP production, mitochondria are also involved in cell signaling, differentiation, cell death, and the cell cycle. Because mitochondria have an essential ole in cellular energy metabolism, mitochondrial dysfunction plays a prominent role in human diseases including neurodegenerative diseases, metabolic disorders, and cancer. Proper distribution of mitochondria within the cell is critical for proper function and it is therefore essential to understand how mitochondria are localized in the cell in both normal and disease states. Myosins are a family of ATP-dependent motor proteins involved in cellular processes such as muscle contraction and organelle transport through the production of force. Most myosin molecules are composed of a head (motor), neck, and tail domain. In particular, the motor domain binds to actin (a component of the cellular skeleton) and uses ATP hydrolysis to generate force and "walk" along the actin. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the founding member of a novel myosin class, myosin- XIX (MYO19), localizes to mitochondria and plays a role in mitochondrial movement (Quintero, 2009).In fact, increased levels of MYO19 in lung cells, induced by the addition of an exogenous MYO19 DNA construct, leads to a gain-of-function where the majority of mitochondria move continuously (Quintero, 2009). The MYO19 motor domain appears to power the movement of mitochondria through interaction with actin filaments (Quintero, 2009). The goal of this project is to increase understanding of how the MYO19 motor domain contributes to mitochondrial movement and will take place in two phases. Phase I involves the generation of the molecular tools necessary to address the role of the MYO19 motor domain in mitochondrialmovement. Phase II involves the use of these tools in molecular assays. It is expected that the work of the Dana assistant will result in a poster presentation at Penn State College of Medicine in August 2012 and contribute to a poster for the 2012 American Society for Cell iology Annual Meeting as well as a scientific publication.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Tiffany Frey


Amie Marie Stewart (2005)

NSF 0406837 NUE: Incorporation of Nanoscience into the Chemistry Curriculum at the Introductory Level

This project sought to introduce nanoscience to a broad cross-section of Dickinson College with outreach to local school systems. The project consisted of three key points, each targeting a different segment of the community: the development of a nanoscience course for non-science majors, the integration of laboratory exercises in nanoscience into chemistry courses required for the majority of science majors at Dickinson and the introduction of a summer workshop on nanoscience for secondary science teachers. The plan of action for this project involved a stepwise introduction of previously-published lab activities, allowing the introduction of newly developed experiments into upper level courses at a later in the project.

Term Funded:Spring 2005
Professor: David Crouch


Amie Marie Stewart (2005)

NSF 0406837 NUE: Incorporation of Nanoscience into the Chemistry Curriculum at the Introductory Level

This project sought to introduce nanoscience to a broad cross-section of Dickinson College with outreach to local school systems. The project consisted of three key points, each targeting a different segment of the community: the development of a nanoscience course for non-science majors, the integration of laboratory exercises in nanoscience into chemistry courses required for the majority of science majors at Dickinson and the introduction of a summer workshop on nanoscience for secondary science teachers. The plan of action for this project involved a stepwise introduction of previously-published lab activities, allowing the introduction of newly developed experiments into upper level courses at a later in the project.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: David Crouch


Amie Marie Stewart (2005)

NSF 0406837 NUE: Incorporation of Nanoscience into the Chemistry Curriculum at the Introductory Level

This project sought to introduce nanoscience to a broad cross-section of Dickinson College with outreach to local school systems. The project consisted of three key points, each targeting a different segment of the community: the development of a nanoscience course for non-science majors, the integration of laboratory exercises in nanoscience into chemistry courses required for the majority of science majors at Dickinson and the introduction of a summer workshop on nanoscience for secondary science teachers. The plan of action for this project involved a stepwise introduction of previously-published lab activities, allowing the introduction of newly developed experiments into upper level courses at a later in the project.

Term Funded:Fall 2004
Professor: David Crouch


Amie Marie Stewart (2005)

Use a Bismuth Salt--Silica Gel Mixture as a Reagent in the Deprotection of Silyl Ethers

This project involves the development of an extension of a method that we recently reported in Tetrahedron Letter. In our earlier work, we showed that some bismuth compounds can be used to remove silicon atoms attached to the oxygen atoms of alcohol groups. Such groups make the alcohol unreactive. In complex molecules, it is often necessary to perform a reaction on one alcohol and not another. So, the ability to selectively remove these silicon atoms (or silyl groups) is important. One drawback of our previously-reported method is the formation of a cloudy, white solid at the end of the reaction, making purification difficult. If, however, it is bound to a solid support, the bismuth reagent could still be available to perform the deprotection reaction but unavailable for reaction with water and base to form the milky white solid. The result would be a reaction that is much easier to perform.

Term Funded:Year 2005
Professor: David Crouch


Mike Stieff (1998)

Synthetic Routes to Enantiomerically-Pure Vicinal Ciols with C2 Symmetry

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: David Crouch


Candice Anne Stumbaugh (2003)

Viability of Bismuth Salts to remove silyl protecting groups

This proposal describes a project to test the viability of using bismuth salts to remove silyl protecting groups. The development of new methods for removing such groups has become increasingly important as the target molecules of synthetic chemists have become more complex. The need for environmentally-friendly methods such as the use of bismuth reagents is of particular importance. Literature precedent indicates that bismuth salts might serve as Lewis acids, facilitating the removal of silyl groups in much the same fashion that zinc bromide has in ongoing work in our laboratory. The goal of the proposed work is to establish conditions by which a bismuth salt will remove some, if not all, silyl groups and determine whether the method allows for selective removal of one silyl group without affecting another such group.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: David Crouch


Candice Anne Stumbaugh (2003)

Viability of Bismuth Salts to remove silyl protecting groups

This proposal describes a project to test the viability of using bismuth salts to remove silyl protecting groups. The development of new methods for removing such groups has become increasingly important as the target molecules of synthetic chemists have become more complex. The need for environmentally-friendly methods such as the use of bismuth reagents is of particular importance. Literature precedent indicates that bismuth salts might serve as Lewis acids, facilitating the removal of silyl groups in much the same fashion that zinc bromide has in ongoing work in our laboratory. The goal of the proposed work is to establish conditions by which a bismuth salt will remove some, if not all, silyl groups and determine whether the method allows for selective removal of one silyl group without affecting another such group.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: David Crouch


Trent Fredrick Stumbaugh (2003)

Substitution reactions of the CpARe(CO)2(THF) Complex

The substitution of the THF solvent molecule from the Cp*Re (CO)2(THF) complex by cyclohexene will be studied to elucidate the mechanism and energetics of this important reaction. By adding methyl substitutes to the THF solvent, the electronic and steric properties of the THF ligand will be systematically varied and the subsequent affect on the Re-THF bond strength will be mapped out.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Rehab George Tabchi (2003)

The Baylis-Hillman Reaction Utilizing Chromium-complexed Styrenes

Many organic reactions can be made to take place more efficiently if a temporary metal template is attached to an organic fragment. This proposal details the use of an organochromium system to allow the completion of the Baylis-Hillman Reaction on an unsubstituted styrene. In the absence of the chromium fragment, the reaction will not take place, but the electron-withdrawing nature of the chromium moiety should permit successful completion of the reaction. This project will extend the Baylis-Hillman reaction to a new family of compounds, and will also add to the synthetic repetoire of organochromium compounds.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Michael Holden


Rehab George Tabchi (2003)

The Baylis-Hillman Reaction Utilizing Chromium-complexed Styrenes

Many organic reactions can be made to take place more efficiently if a temporary metal template is attached to an organic fragment. This proposal details the use of an organochromium system to allow the completion of the Baylis-Hillman Reaction on an unsubstituted styrene. In the absence of the chromium fragment, the reaction will not take place, but the electron-withdrawing nature of the chromium moiety should permit successful completion of the reaction. This project will extend the Baylis-Hillman reaction to a new family of compounds, and will also add to the synthetic repetoire of organochromium compounds.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Michael Holden


Pamela Gulden Thompson (1991)

investigating the use of computers in chemistry

n/a

Term Funded:summer 1990
Professor: Cindy Samet


Rebecca Sarah Katherine Thompson (2013)

Organic Research

Term Funded:Spring 2011
Professor: Michael Holden


Andrew Harper Tolbert (2015)

Applied Research and Photonics

Research internship

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Sarah St. Angelo St. Angelo


Alexander Kevin Tucker-Schwartz (2005)

Ionic Liquids in theDeprotection of Silyl Ethers

Deprotection of silyl ethers continues to be an important step in many organic synthetic schemes. One problem with protection/deprotection protocols is the addition of extra steps to already long reaction schemes and, in industrial settings, the problem is exacerbated by large waste streams and the cost of their handling. So, the development of environmentally-friendly reagents and solvents that can be reused is very desirable. Ionic liquids are organic compounds consisting of a positive and negative ion and possess the unusual characteristic of being liquids near room temperature. In recent years, these chemical oddities have been used as solvents in organic reactions with the added advantage that they can be recovered, purified and reused in subsequent reactions. This explains the growing popularity of ionic liquids as solvents in organic chemistry. Recently, the role ionic liquids in organic systhesis has been expanded with the introduction of ionic liquids bearing reactive groups such as acids. These combination compounds serve as a solvent and a reactant in organic reactions and, like other ionic liquids, they can be recycled. This proposal describes some preliminary results obtained last summer that show that ionic liquids can effect deprotection of silyl ethers. It also suggests some approaches to solve the seemingly competitive issues of obtaining high chemical yields in the deprotection reaction and recovering and reusing the ionic liquid.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: David Crouch


Alexander Kevin Tucker-Schwartz (2005)

Ionic Liquids in theDeprotection of Silyl Ethers

Deprotection of silyl ethers continues to be an important step in many organic synthetic schemes. One problem with protection/deprotection protocols is the addition of extra steps to already long reaction schemes and, in industrial settings, the problem is exacerbated by large waste streams and the cost of their handling. So, the development of environmentally-friendly reagents and solvents that can be reused is very desirable. Ionic liquids are organic compounds consisting of a positive and negative ion and possess the unusual characteristic of being liquids near room temperature. In recent years, these chemical oddities have been used as solvents in organic reactions with the added advantage that they can be recovered, purified and reused in subsequent reactions. This explains the growing popularity of ionic liquids as solvents in organic chemistry. Recently, the role ionic liquids in organic systhesis has been expanded with the introduction of ionic liquids bearing reactive groups such as acids. These combination compounds serve as a solvent and a reactant in organic reactions and, like other ionic liquids, they can be recycled. This proposal describes some preliminary results obtained last summer that show that ionic liquids can effect deprotection of silyl ethers. It also suggests some approaches to solve the seemingly competitive issues of obtaining high chemical yields in the deprotection reaction and recovering and reusing the ionic liquid.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: David Crouch


Jennifer Burger Walker (2001)

Selective Protection of Alcohols in the Presence of beta- and gamma-hydroxyethers

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: David Crouch


Heather Grace Ward (2002)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Joyce Whitehead


Jodi Elaine Wiegand (1999)

A Kinetic and Mechanistic Investigation of the Reacion Between CpMn(CO)2 and Diphenyl Diazomethane

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Ashfaq Bengali


Olivia Harper Wilkins (2015)

Quantitative Analysis of Resveratrol Using UV-vis and HPLC

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: Amy Witter


Anna Beatrice Williams (2006)

Design, synthesis and assay ofcyclopropane-containing agonists of a-adrenergic agents

In our previous report, we described work toward the coupling of aromatic rings, formation of the cyclopropyl group from an cz4S-unsaturated nitrile and the conversion of the nitrile into an imidazoline ring. During the summer of 2006, our work on this project focused on two primary areas: completing the study of the microwave-mediated Suzuki couplings with aryltrifluoroborate salts and bringing the individual transformations together into a complete synthetic pathway leading to the target molecules.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Daviod Crouch


Anna Beatrice Williams (2006)

Organic Synthesis on Solid Supports: Application to the preparation of a new adrenergic agonist

One of the challenges in organic synthesis is isolation of the product from complex reaction mixtures. In recent years, methods have been developed in which a small organic molecule can be attached to a polymer bead and after a reaction on the organic molecule, the product can be isolated as a solid. We wish to begin to apply this method - Solid Phase Organic Synthesis - to a project in which a new series of compounds that may have activity as an agonist of the a1A receptor in the human bladder neck. This project is supported by funds from the Research Corporation.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Davide Crouch


Anna Beatrice Williams (2006)

Design, synthesis and assay ofcyclopropane-containing agonists of a-adrenergic agents

In our previous report, we described work toward the coupling of aromatic rings, formation of the cyclopropyl group from an cz4S-unsaturated nitrile and the conversion of the nitrile into an imidazoline ring. During the summer of 2006, our work on this project focused on two primary areas: completing the study of the microwave-mediated Suzuki couplings with aryltrifluoroborate salts and bringing the individual transformations together into a complete synthetic pathway leading to the target molecules.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: David Crouch


Tianju Zhou (2012)

Linking Antimetastatic Acitivity to Reduction Potential and Rate of Hydrolysis in a Series of N-alkyl substituted NAMI-A derivatives

NAMI-A is a ruthenium containing compound currently undergoing phase II clinical trials for the treatment of metastatic tumors. This project will attempt to correlate the anticancer activity of a range of ruthenium containing compounds derived from NAMI-A with properties such as reduction potential, rate of hydrolysis, and energies of frontier orbitals. Prior research indicates that the first two properties may be linked to increased cytotoxicity. However, no direct correlation has been made that would facilitate the design of new drugs to take advantage of this effect.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Kristi Humphreys


Classical Studies

Kaylin Marianne Bednarz (2015)

Development of online text and commentary series for intermediate classical language learners, the Dickinson Commentaries.

Digitizing the index to Allen & Greenough, and editing of Perseus XML of Allen & Greenough.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Christopher Francese


Brendan M Boston (2011)

Development of online text and commentary series for intermediate classical language learners, the Dickinson Commentaries.

Brendan Boston ('11) helped select comments for Caesar Gallic War selections, drawing from existing sources in the public domain; edited the Latin text to conform with the OCT; created first draft of vocabulary lists for Caesar commentary; and digitized many maps from older school editions of the Gallic War.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Christopher Francese


Joelle Taylor Cicak (2016)

Development of online text and commentary series for intermediate classical language learners, the Dickinson Commentaries.

Joelle Cicak (Dickinson '16) drew 4 original illustrations for Nepos commentary.

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Christopher Francese


Christina Marie Errico (2015)

Digitization of Thomas Dwight Goodell's Greek Grammar for Schools

Christina Errico (Dickinson '15) worked on the digitization of Thomas Dwight Goodell's Greek Grammar for Schools

Term Funded:Summer 2014
Professor: Christopher Francese


Alice Florence Ettling (2012)

Development of online text and commentary series for intermediate classical language learners, the Dickinson Commentaries.

Alice Ettling (Dickinson '12) created the initial drafts of the core Greek and Latin vocabulary lists, made map animations for Caesar commentary, added Allen & Greenough references to Ovid commentary

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Christopher Francese


Alice Florence Ettling (2012)

Development of online text and commentary series for intermediate classical language learners, the Dickinson Commentaries.

In this project the student will help to develop the innovative online text and commentary series for intermediate classical language learners, the Dickinson Commentaries. Alice Ettling ('11) created the Google Earth map animations to go with the Caesar Gallic War selections. She added links to Allen & Greenough's Latin grammar.

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: Christopher Francese


Kristin Elaine Fanciullacci (2009)

Emotional display in Roman elegy

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Meghan Reedy


Derek Gordon Frymark (2012)

Digitization of Henry Frieze's Vergilian Dictionary

Classics Summer Research Assistantship •Derek Frymark (Dickinson '12) worked on the digitization of Henry Frieze's Vergilian Dictionary.

Term Funded:Summer 2014
Professor: Christopher Francese


Derek Gordon Frymark (2012)

Development of online text and commentary series for intermediate classical language learners, the Dickinson Commentaries.

In this project the student will help to develop the innovative online text and commentary series for intermediate classical language learners, the Dickinson Commentaries. Derek Frymark ('11) created the first draft of the vocabulary lists for the Sulpicius Severus' Life of St. Martin, and added satellite map imagery.

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: Christopher Francese


Derek Gordon Frymark (2012)

Development of online text and commentary series for intermediate classical language learners, the Dickinson Commentaries.

In this project the student will help to develop the innovative online text and commentary series for intermediate classical language learners, the Dickinson Commentaries. Derek Frymark (Dickinson '12) edited core vocabularies, worked on running lists for Cicero Pro Caelio, and uploaded and formatted content to Ovid commentary

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Christopher Francese


Derek Gordon Frymark (2012)

An index for "Ancient Rome: An Anthology of Sources" by Christopher Francese

Derek Frymark (Dickinson '12) made spreadsheets for the core vocabularies, including frequency data, compiled index for Francese's book Ancient Rome: An Anthology of Sources.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Christopher Francese


James Michael Martin (2013)

Development of online text and commentary series for intermediate classical language learners, the Dickinson Commentaries.

In this project the student will help to develop the innovative online text and commentary series for intermediate classical language learners, the Dickinson Commentaries. James Martin (Dickinson '13) edited core vocabularies, worked on running lists for Caesar and Ovid commentaries.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Christopher Francese


Elizabeth Marie Parker (2009)

Prudentius' Psychomachia

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Marc Mastrangelo


Daniel Plekhov (2014)

Pleiades/Pelagios/DCC integration

Pleiades/Pelagios/DCC integration, created Arc GIS maps for the DCC Caesar commentary, created new table of contents for the Callimachus commentary.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Christopher Francese


Qingyu Wang (2014)

Pleiades/Pelagios/DCC

Qingyu Wang (Dickinson '14) worked on Pleiades/Pelagios/DCC integration, created databases for core vocabularies, worked on new interface for Allen & Greenough's Latin Grammar.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Christopher Francese


Qingyu Wang (2014)

Mandarin Chinese translations for words in the DCC Core Greek and Latin vocabularies.

Qingyu Wang (Dickinson '14) worked on Mandarin Chinese translations for words in the DCC Core Greek and Latin vocabularies.

Term Funded:Spring 2014
Professor: Christopher Francese


Meredith Ashley Wilson (2013)

Development of online text and commentary series for intermediate classical language learners, the Dickinson Commentaries.

In this project the student will help to develop the innovative online text and commentary series for intermediate classical language learners, the Dickinson Commentaries. Meredith Wilson (Dickinson '13) edited core vocabularies, worked on running lists for Ovid commentary, and made Google Earth maps for Ovid and Sulpicius Severus commentaries

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Christopher Francese


College Farm

Kalyn Laurel Campbell (2010)

Teaching Garden at the College Farm

Teaching Garden at the College Farm

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Jenn Halpin


Katelyn Hollie Repash (2011)

Seasonal Menu Specialist

Seasonal Menu Specialist

Term Funded:Fall 2010
Professor: Jenn Halpin


Samuel George Wheeler (2010)

Solar Power Vehicle Design: The Solar Wheeler

Solar Power Vehicle Design: The Solar Wheeler

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Matt Steiman


College Relations

Todd Matthew Derkacz (2004)

Editorial Assistant for Dickinson Magazine

Editorial assistant for Dickinson Magazine. Student will assist magazine editor in production of the quarterly alumni magazine. The intern also will have the opportunity to write campus news stories, features stories and alumni profiles, and do background research for more comprehensive stories. The student will have the chance to polish interviewing skills-by speaking with story sources face to face and over the phone-and improve his or her newswriting and feature-writing skills. The student also may assist with gathering and writing of class notes and obituaries. The intern will have the opportunity to work with the World Wide Web, since the magazine is continuing to upgrade its Web site. For example, the student will learn to scan alumni photos that will then be posted on the Web. In addition, the student will accompany the editor to a press check and observe the printing of the magazine. The student will be taught the importance of accurate and thorough reporting, clear writing, adherence to deadlines and diligent proofreading. He or she also will be taught to use a stylebook and to use proofreading symbols.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Sherri Kimmel


Kathryn Benner Vadell (2005)

Editorial Assistant for Dickinson Magazine

Editorial assistant for Dickinson Magazine. Student will assist magazine editor in production of the quarterly alumni magazine. The intern also will have the opportunity to write campus news stories, features stories and alumni profiles, and do background research for more comprehensive stories. The student will have the chance to polish interviewing skills-by speaking with story sources face to face and over the phone-and improve his or her newswriting and feature-writing skills. The student also may assist with gathering and writing of class notes and obituaries. The intern will have the opportunity to work with the World Wide Web, since the magazine is continuing to upgrade its Web site. For example, the student will learn to scan alumni photos that will then be posted on the Web. In addition, the student will accompany the editor to a press check and observe the printing of the magazine. The student will be taught the importance of accurate and thorough reporting, clear writing, adherence to deadlines and diligent proofreading. He or she also will be taught to use a stylebook and to use proofreading symbols.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Sherri Kimmel


Director of Multicultural Affairs

Gregory Vance Poff (1993)

Program Development Issues on Diversity

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: Pamela Blake


Earth Sciences

Paige Marie Garner Hollenbeck (2012)

NASA GCCE Grant: Developing New Proxy for Quantifying Paleoseasonality

Developing New Proxy for Quantifying Paleoseasonality

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Marcus Key


Gregory Everett Lasher (2011)

Climate Implications for Legacy Sediment Remobilization

Climate Implications for Legacy Sediment Remobilization

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Jeff Niemitz


Kyle Robert Long (2014)

NASA GCCE Grant: Implications of Increasing Extreme Climate Events on Nutrient Inputs from the Chesapeake Watershed to the Bay

Implications of Increasing Extreme Climate Events on Nutrient Inputs from the Chesapeake Watershed to the Bay

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Jeffrey Niemitz


Aleksander Perpalaj (2014)

NSF 122017 RUI: Testing Hypotheses on Pillow Lava Production During Glaciovolcanic Eruptions

Pillow lavas are one of the most common types of lava morphologies on Earth, yet compared to subaerial lava flows, the emplacement dynamics of pillow-dominated eruptions are less understood simply because of their relative inaccessibility. The main goals of this study are (1) to establish a comprehensive database of subglacial pillow characteristics for comparison to pillow lavas produced in other environments (e.g., marine), and (2) to test and potentially revise existing models for the construction of subglacial volcanoes. Modern field and analytical techniques will be used to document the three-dimensional structure, stratigraphy, and geochemistry of two different subglacial pillow ridges with excellent exposures: (1) aggregate quarries in pillow ridges on the Reykjanes Peninsula in southwest Iceland, and (2) natural exposures of Pillow Ridge in northern British Columbia. A broad-based research team has been established, comprising U.S., Icelandic and Canadian scientists working in full collaboration.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Elizabeth Ann Plascencia (2016)

NSF 085670 STEP Program at Dickinson College

Through this program, Dickinson intends to recruit and matriculate a "science posse" cohort in each of three years beginning in the fall of 2009. The science posse program will have three major components: 1) a four-week summer pre-matriculation program in which students will participate in lab research and a series of enrichment workshops in chemistry and mathematics; 2) a second eight-week summer of research with Dickinson faculty members using our successful model of student/faculty research; and 3) a capstone eight-week summer research experience at off-campus laboratories in major research universities. The program will provide a strong mentoring experience for underrepresented students to support their pursuit of a science major. The successful implementation of this plan will result in the establishment of a cohort of science major role models for future students among our underrepresented minority groups. Results of the program will be disseminated widely within the broader scientific education community so that they may serve as a model for other institutions.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Rebecca Katherine Rossi (2013)

NSF 1039461 RAPID-RUI: Constraints on Fragmentation and Lava-Ice Contact From Ongoing 2010 Eyjafjallajokull Eruption, Southcentral Iceland

Constraints on fragmentation and lava-ice contact from ongoing 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption, southcentral Iceland

Term Funded:
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Rebecca Katherine Rossi (2013)

Testing a new paleoclimate proxy on a temperate bryozoan from New Zealand

The goal of this project is to develop a method to quantify the amount of seasonal temperature variation in the past. This information will be useful to climate modelers who want to know not just what the mean temperature in the future will be due to global warming, but to be able to predict the future seasonal extremes from summer to winter. The method will be tested off the coast of New Zealand where there are maximum seasonal seawater temperature variations. We will use the shape and chemistry of marine bryozoans (they form coral-like colonies) as proxies for temperature. The sizes of the animals in the colonies as well as the ratio of oxygen 16 to 18 atoms in the skeleton's minerals should allow us to independently quantify the seasonal range in temperatures. The student will learn valuable new lab, analytical, international team work, writing, and oral presentation skills.

Term Funded:12 2012
Professor: Marcus Key


William Lyle Seward (2012)

NSF 1039461 RAPID-RUI: Constraints on Fragmentation and Lava-Ice Contact From Ongoing 2010 Eyjafjallajokull Eruption, Southcentral Iceland

Constraints on Fragmentation and Lava-Ice Contact From Ongoing 2010 Eyjafjallajokull Eruption, Southcentral Iceland

Term Funded:fall 2011
Professor: Ben Edwards


Ellen Hope Was (2014)

National Geographic Society: Field documentation of water-ice-lava interactions in the 2010 Gigjokull lava flow

The 2010 Eyjafjallajokull eruption made global news as ash from the eruption disrupted air traffic throughout much of Europe. The eruption had three distinct products: (1) basaltic lava flows erupted to the east of the main summit at Fimmvorduhals; (2) tephra erupted from the main summit vents; and (3) a lava flow that traveled down the edge of Gigjokull glacier. While the first two products have been extensively studied (e.g. Edwards et al, in review; Thordarson et al, in review), the Gigjokull lava flow has not been documented in detail. The PI and two student collaborators made two recognizance visits via helicopter and alpine trekking in 2011. These visits, while brief, discovered evidence for dynamically changing environments while the lava flow traveled along the edge and through the western side of Gigjokull glacier. We propose to spend 5-7 days in late summer/early fall 2012 to test hypotheses for mechanisms by which intermediate composition lava flows can advance through glaciers. Hypotheses to be tested include: (A) that lava flow paths are largely constrained by syn-eruption meltwater drainage channels; (B) that water-filled cavities can persist as lava moves through the ice; and (C) that evidence for initial water emplacement can by 'hidden' by subsequent subaerial lava flows that effectively bury earlier, subaqueous lava flow phases.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Ellen Hope Was (2014)

NSF 122017 RUI: Testing Hypotheses on Pillow Lava Production During Glaciovolcanic Eruptions

Pillow lavas are one of the most common types of lava morphologies on Earth, yet compared to subaerial lava flows, the emplacement dynamics of pillow-dominated eruptions are less understood simply because of their relative inaccessibility. The main goals of this study are (1) to establish a comprehensive database of subglacial pillow characteristics for comparison to pillow lavas produced in other environments (e.g., marine), and (2) to test and potentially revise existing models for the construction of subglacial volcanoes. Modern field and analytical techniques will be used to document the three-dimensional structure, stratigraphy, and geochemistry of two different subglacial pillow ridges with excellent exposures: (1) aggregate quarries in pillow ridges on the Reykjanes Peninsula in southwest Iceland, and (2) natural exposures of Pillow Ridge in northern British Columbia. A broad-based research team has been established, comprising U.S., Icelandic and Canadian scientists working in full collaboration.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Ellen Hope Was (2014)

NSF1220176 RUI: Testing Hypotheses on Pillow Lava Production During Glaciovolcanic Eruptions

Pillow lavas are one of the most common types of lava morphologies on Earth, yet compared to subaerial lava flows, the emplacement dynamics of pillow-dominated eruptions are less understood simply because of their relative inaccessibility. The main goals of this study are (1) to establish a comprehensive database of subglacial pillow characteristics for comparison to pillow lavas produced in other environments (e.g., marine), and (2) to test and potentially revise existing models for the construction of subglacial volcanoes. Modern field and analytical techniques will be used to document the three-dimensional structure, stratigraphy, and geochemistry of two different subglacial pillow ridges with excellent exposures: (1) aggregate quarries in pillow ridges on the Reykjanes Peninsula in southwest Iceland, and (2) natural exposures of Pillow Ridge in northern British Columbia. A broad-based research team has been established, comprising U.S., Icelandic and Canadian scientists working in full collaboration.

Term Funded:summer 2012
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


East Asian Studies

Rachel M Chen (2000)

Chinese Women at the Turn of the Millenium

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Rae Yang


Kimberly Fairfield (2006)

Project that explores thenature of patriotism and rights consciousness in China

I have been engaged in this project since 1998, by attempting to gauge how ordinary citizens and officials in China treat, in terms of job allocation, access to state institutions, entitlements, and accommodations for physical disabilities, those individuals who have been officially designated as "patriotic exemplars" - mainly veterans and family members of 'revolutionary martyrs' and mobilized soldiers. I have attempted to incorporate some of the more theoretical and comparative literature into my Freshman Seminar, "Patriotism in Politics, Culture and History." I am applying for a Dana Research Assistant to help me accomplish the following tasks: 1) develop the Freshman Seminar into a full-fledged course that I will teach on a regular basis; 2) prepare, by February 2004, a grant proposal to the Fulbright Scholarship Board, which awards up to $20,000 to alumni of the Fulbright program to continue their scholarly activities at their home universities; 3) prepare the literature review for my manuscript, currently titled, "Hollow Glory: the Politics of Everyday Patriotism in China."

Term Funded:Year 2004
Professor: Neil Diamant


Economics

Timothy Phelan Bender (2004)

Revised Ten year Plan for the Hope Station Neighborhood of Carlisle; and Economic Impact and Demand for the Carlisle Theater

This summer research project involves the completion of two research projects requested by members of the Carlisle community. The first involves a report which will update the needs and public policy goals for the Hope Station-Memorial Park neighborhood of Carlisle in light of 2000 census data. It was requested by Chris Gullatta, head of the Cumberland County redevelopment authority. The second includes the writing of a final report regarding the demand for and economic impact of the Carlisle Theatre. Both reports will be based on original research conducted with my Economic Analysis of Policy course this spring, and my co-author probably will be an outstanding current member of that class. As with previous projects of this type, including last year's economic impact study of Dickinson College and a previous study of the Whitaker Center in Harrisburg, significant editing, further data collection, and additional analysis will be needed in order to make these reports valuable to the Carlisle constituencies who requested them.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: William Bellinger


Alexander Patton Bloom (2011)

Book manuscript on Cuban Urban Agriculture

As the R/D committee already knows, after spending a sabbatical semester in Cuba in the Spring of 2007 studying urban agriculture, presenting several papers at conferences and publishing three articles, I decided to write a book on the subject. The subject itself is both fascinating and timely. It is fascinating because it tells the story of an already besieged, small island country, at least in part, successfully responding to a massive economic crisis (including a food production crisis). The massive economic crisis was brought about by the collapse of the Soviet Union and the ending of an economic lifeline [especially petroleum] for Cuba that had for decades been used to compensate for the economic isolation imposed on the island by the United States of America. It was as if Cuba had been pushed of a cliff and had to come up with a parachute on the way down. As the R/D committee already knows, after spending a sabbatical semester in Cuba in the Spring of 2007 studying urban agriculture, presenting several papers at conferences and publishing three articles, I decided to write a book on the subject. The subject itself is both fascinating and timely. It is fascinating because it tells the story of an already besieged, small island country, at least in part, successfully responding to a massive economic crisis (including a food production crisis). The massive economic crisis was brought about by the collapse of the Soviet Union and the ending of an economic lifeline [especially petroleum] for Cuba that had for decades been used to compensate for the economic isolation imposed on the island by the United States of America. It was as if Cuba had been pushed of a cliff and had to come up with a parachute on the way down.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Sinan Koont


Tessa Sierra Cicak (2013)

Innovation by London's Water Companies: Internalizing public health externalities

In presenting my research on the history of London's water supply, the audience has always wanted a better picture to help them understand the location of the companies and the extent of competition between them. I have relied on one map drawn in 1884, which never fully satisfies. After taking my project to Jim Ciarrocca this spring, I was lucky to pique the interest of Tessa Cicak, a GIS intern. In consultation with me and based on the William Farr data that I have been using in my research this spring, Tessa developed GIS maps of London districts and sub-districts with water company and cholera data. Tessa presented her research at the student GIS symposium on May 4, 2012, and received a lot of interest. During fall 2012, I would like to work with Tessa to refine and add to these maps and to co-author a paper to submit to a journal by December 2012.

Term Funded:fall 2012
Professor: Nicola Tynan


Patrick James Connolly (2005)

Eugenics and Other Evils: G.K. Ehesterton's Argument against the Scientifically Organized State Part II

This is a continuation of my previous Dana projects (please see the attached copy of my summer 2002 and fall 2002 Dana project proposals) studying G.K. Chesterton's political economy and the role he played in the eugenics debates in the early 20th century. The project this year has faced some set backs. In the fall I had to bring a new intern on board. My previous intern was unable to dedicate a sufficient number of hours to the project. This put the project behind schedule since we had already spent a number of hours in training and it meant that training time would have to be devoted to a new intern. Additionally, I had some difficulty getting good quality source material. The degraded material meant poor quality scans and, hence, poor quality text conversion that required more hands on correction. In spite of all the setbacks, my present intern, Patrick Connolly and I have found new supplies of original source material and have developed a very good working relationship. The project has born fruit thus far and I hope to continue the job of digitizing the rest of Chesterton's contributions to the Eyewitness and the New Witness. This summer I will present results of my on going research at David Levy's summer seminar and prepare papers for presentation at conferences next year. Please see goals given in the previous proposals listed below for more detail. For additional information about my G.K. Chesterton project please see the following Dana requests from the summer of 2002 and the fall of 2002.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Edward McPhail


Patrick James Connolly (2005)

Eugenics and other Evils: G. K. Chesterton's Argument against the Scientifically Organized State Part III

This is a continuation of my previous Dana projects (please see the attached copy of my summer 2002 and fall 2002 Dana project proposals) studying G.K. Chesterton's political economy and the role he played in the eugenics debates in the early 20th century. The project this year has faced some set backs. In the fall I had to bring a new intern on board. My previous intern was unable to dedicate a sufficient number of hours to the project. This put the project behind schedule since we had already spent a number of hours in training and it meant that training time would have to be devoted to a new intern. Additionally, I had some difficulty getting good quality source material. The degraded material meant poor quality scans and, hence, poor quality text conversion that required more hands on correction. In spite of all the setbacks, my present intern, Patrick Connolly and I have found new supplies of original source material and have developed a very good working relationship. The project has born fruit thus far and I hope to continue the job of digitizing the rest of Chesterton's contributions to the Eyewitness and the New Witness. This summer I will present results of my on going research at David Levy's summer seminar and prepare papers for presentation at conferences next year. Please see goals given in the previous proposals listed below for more detail. For additional information about my G.K. Chesterton project please see the following Dana requests from the summer of 2002 and the fall of 2002.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Edward McPhail


Patrick James Connolly (2005)

Political Economy of the Chester-Belloc

This is a continuation of my previous Dana projects studying G. K. Chesterton's political economy and the role he played in the eugenics debates in the early 20th century. This project has expanded in a number of directions. In addition to Chesterton, I am now exploring the economic thought of Hilaire Belloc. Belloc provides a unique insight into Chesterton's own political economy since Belloc's The Servile State provides the analytical foundation for a number of Chesterton's arguments. Thus far my intern and I have digitized all of The Eyewitness, all of Chesterton's contributions to GK's Weekly, and some of his work in The New Witness. Now I wish to finish with Chesterton's contributions to The New Witness and, if the opportunity arises, to digitize all of the non-Chesterton articles from GK's Weekly and The New Witness. My goals are to continue mining this digital library for my own research, as well as working to bring it to the web. With the assistance of Robert Cavanaugh's shop and Brenda Landis in particular, steps have already been made in the direction.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Edward McPhail


Patrick James Connolly (2005)

Eugenics and Other Evils: G.K. Ehesterton's Argument against the Scientifically Organized State Part II

Gilbert Keith Chesterton's reputation as a novelist, essayist, and critic is secure. His Father Brown mysteries are widely recognized as some of the cleverest in the English language and his literary biographies, especially that of Dickens, are still considered essential reading. On the other hand, his voluminous writings on the social and economic ills of his day are treated with indifference by many and even scorn by others. Yet, in Chesterton's own lifetime he was regarded as a social thinker to be reckoned with. He regularly took to the podium against the leading intellectuals of his day. H.G. Wells, Bertrand Russell, and his close friend and frequent sparring partner, George Bernard Shaw, were but a few of his intellectual adversaries. Out of the many controversies in which Chesterton participated, his role in the pre-WWII debates on eugenics ought to be of particular interest to political economists. Not only does Chesterton demonstrate an uncanny prescience regarding the expansion of the "scientific state" and consequent loss of liberty under Nazi Germany, he was well aware of the seductive quality of eugenical arguments that combined a sense of superiority (due to either race, economic status, or lineage) with the theory of evolution backed by the full power of the state. Particularly illuminating is Chesterton's economic sociology, his defenses of the family and economic liberty, his recognition of the roles institutions and traditions play, his novel explanation of tradition as democracy extended through time and his claim that tradition and democracy are mutually reinforcing. All of these arguments provide the groundwork for understanding the contested terrain of the early 20th century eugenics debates. My goals for this summer project are (a) to finish my pape

Term Funded:Year 2003
Professor: Edward McPhail


Heather Brianne Davis (2004)

The Economic Impact of the U.S. Army War College

The U.S. Army War College is a unique combination of military base, educational institution, think tank, and historical site. As such, the analysis of its economic effects proved very challenging- One unique aspect of the post is its dual identity. In this paper the terms Carlisle Barracks and U.S.. Army War College will be used interchangeably, although the two have been synonymous for just over 50 years, a relatively short time in the long history of the Barracks.. Another unique aspect is its educational function, which significantly affects the post's personnel profile. Compared to most military bases, the Carlisle Barracks' employees include a large percentage of officers among the military and a very high percentage of civilian employees if local contractors are included. At less than 3%.of a square mile, it is also among the smallest military bases in the nation. This paper analyzes the economic impact of the U.S Army War College through a combination of statistics provided by War College Officials, results from a survey of barracks residents, general statistical information, and models of regional and county economies provided by the Bureau of Economic Analysis of the U.S. Department of Commerce. The results are impressive, particularly for a smaller facility. For example, the post directly or indircctly provides about 10 percent of the total income and earnings and nearly 8 percent of the total jobs in the Carlisle area.

Term Funded:Spring 2004
Professor: William Bellinger


Chris Aaron Dumbroski (2007)

The Political Economy of Charles Nisbet

As the first president of Dickinson College Charles Nisbet is primarily known for his role as an early educator in America not for his economic thought. Although unknown to the economics profession, Nisbet's unpublished lectures on economics are of interest not only because of their novelty, but also because they serve to demonstrate the fluidity of ideas. They provide yet another piece of evidence helping to map out the complex web of ideas linking Scotland and America. From my research thus far it is clear that Nisbet was sympathetic to the Common Sense tradition of Thomas Reid and shows all the earmarks of a scholar who moved in the intellectual circles of 18th century Edinburgh. His letters and lectures demonstrate that he was well versed in the writings of the leading thinkers of his day. I propose to produce a text searchable version of his lectures and write a paper assessing his political economy.

Term Funded:Year 2007
Professor: Ed McPhail


Gerald Anthony Fennemore (1993)

Textbook for Introductory Economics Courses

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: Gordon Bergsten


Michael James Franks (2005)

Eugenics and Other Evils: G.K. Chesterton's Argument against the Scientifically Organized State

Gilbert Keith Chesterton's reputation as a novelist, essayist, and critic is secure. His Father Brown mysteries are widely recognized as some of the cleverest in the English language and his literary biographies, especially that of Dickens, are still considered essential reading. On the other hand, his voluminous writings on the social and economic ills of his day are treated with indifference by many and even scorn by others. Yet, in Chesterton's own lifetime he was regarded as a social thinker to be reckoned with. He regularly took to the podium against the leading intellectuals of his day. H.G. Wells, Bertrand Russell, and his close friend and frequent sparring partner, George Bernard Shaw, were but a few of his intellectual adversaries. Out of the many controversies in which Chesterton participated, his role in the pre-WWII debates on eugenics ought to be of particular interest to political economists. Not only does Chesterton demonstrate an uncanny prescience regarding the expansion of the "scientific state" and consequent loss of liberty under Nazi Germany, he was well aware of the seductive quality of eugenical arguments that combined a sense of superiority (due to either race, economic status, or lineage) with the theory of evolution backed by the full power of the state. Particularly illuminating is Chesterton's economic sociology, his defenses of the family and economic liberty, his recognition of the roles institutions and traditions play, his novel explanation of tradition as democracy extended through time and his claim that tradition and democracy are mutually reinforcing. All of these arguments provide the groundwork for understanding the contested terrain of the early 20th century eugenics debates. My goals for this summer project are: (a) to finish my pape

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Edward McPhail


Evgeniya Marinova Gencheva (2008)

Carlisle Area Homelessness and Income Density in Small Pennsylvania Towns

This Dana Research Assistant will aid in the completion of a research report on the characteristics and services provided to the homeless and shelter population of the Carlisle area. This project was originally undertaken as a senior seminar class project in the Spring of 2006 at the request of the United Way of Carlisle and Cumberland County. Some new analysis. When the final report on local homelessness is submitted, the Dana assistant can then participate in an ongoing study of income density (income per unit of geography) in small towns, which has a very different pattern than median household income. For example the richest neighborhood in Carlisle measured by income density surrounds Memorial Park. This project will involve mapping contiguous areas of high income density for the 18 Pennsylvania boroughs for which data has been collected and analyzing market areas and retail prospects for these areas. Some travel to selected towns may be required. I am requesting 500 miles and two overnight stays as a type of declining balance.

Term Funded:Year 2007
Professor: Bill Bellinger


Amy Anne Moss (2004)

The Economic Impact of the U.S. Army War College

The U.S. Army War College is a unique combination of military base, educational institution, think tank, and historical site. As such, the analysis of its economic effects proved very challenging- One unique aspect of the post is its dual identity. In this paper the terms Carlisle Barracks and U.S.. Army War College will be used interchangeably, although the two have been synonymous for just over 50 years, a relatively short time in the long history of the Barracks.. Another unique aspect is its educational function, which significantly affects the post's personnel profile. Compared to most military bases, the Carlisle Barracks' employees include a large percentage of officers among the military and a very high percentage of civilian employees if local contractors are included. At less than 3%.of a square mile, it is also among the smallest military bases in the nation. This paper analyzes the economic impact of the U.S Army War College through a combination of statistics provided by War College Officials, results from a survey of barracks residents, general statistical information, and models of regional and county economies provided by the Bureau of Economic Analysis of the U.S. Department of Commerce. The results are impressive, particularly for a smaller facility. For example, the post directly or indircctly provides about 10 percent of the total income and earnings and nearly 8 percent of the total jobs in the Carlisle area.

Term Funded:Spring 2004
Professor: William Bellinger


Signe Elneff Poulsen (1995)

Case Study of the Tariff Act of 1930

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1994
Professor: Michael Fratantuono


Benjamin Christopher Rafetto (2009)

Measurement and Analysis of the Income Density (Income Per Acre) Patterns of Small Towns

This year's request includes several additional steps of an ongoing research project involving the measurement and analysis of the income density (income per acre) patterns of small towns. Relatively poor neighborhoods in terms of median household income also contain dense housing and high populations, and therefore have far more concentrated purchasing power than one would imagine from household income patterns alone. This year's project involves finalizing a paper for presentation in October, comparing geographical patterns of income density and median household income for Pennsylvania towns, and developing and analyzing a larger data set including similarly sized towns from other regions of the nation.

Term Funded:Year 2008
Professor: William Bellinger


Jonathan David Rogers (2006)

Completion of a textbook entitled the "Economic Analysis of Policy"

I am requesting a year-long Dana Research assistant to work on two different projects. The first project is the completion of a textbook entitled the "Economic Analysis of Policy." While the body of the text is nearly complete, ancillary materials such as chapter ending problems must be added, and a good student's view of the clarity and substance of the chapters will be invaluable in the final stages of editing. The second project involves adding to a data set on the income density (income per acre) of small town neighborhoods and making contacts with officials in order to discuss specific details of local neighborhoods and possible implications of this analysis for local development plans. Some towns for which data has already been collected are Carlisle, Chambersburg, Gettysburg, Columbia, Johnstown, Lewistown, Lebanon, Pottsville, Pottstown and Williamsport.

Term Funded:Year 2006
Professor: William Bellinger


Jonathan David Rogers (2006)

Compensating Losers: Is it all Politics?

Economists constantly provide examples of policy changes where the benefits to some would outweigh the losses to others. Known as Kaldor-Hicks efficiency improvements, these policy changes are considered beneficial even if winners could only compensate losers in principle. It seems Kaldor-Hicks is accepted in practice: few examples of efficiency-improving policy change involve actual compensation to losers. Some examples are highly contentious payments for making a major institutional change. Others pass with little mention.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Nicola Tynan


John Bradley Saia (2002)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Andrew McPhail


Holly Lynn Sasso (2001)

Analysis of the Demand for Performing Arts at the Carlisle Theatre

This study will involve gathering a data base of factors affecting demand for the performing arts at the Carlisle Theater and statistically estimating the impact of various factors on Carlisle Theater attendance. These factors include ticket price, the type of performer, the availability of substitute performances, the day of the week, weather, and any other factors of relevance. An audience survey may be required to identify characteristics of the Carlisle theater audience and its preferences for types of performers. Part of the study will also include collecting attendance data for other Central Pennsylvania arts facilities in order to build a broad data base for arts demand in Central Pennsylvania. For the summer, student-faculty research involving a student from my current Economic Analysis of Policy course would be an ideal basis for completing the demand study. This study will lead to a paper summarizing our findings regarding the demand for the arts at the Carlisle Theater. We will also begin work on another paper summarizing our analysis of the economics of the Arts in Central Pennsylvania.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Willian Bellinger


Danielle Vigilante Webb (2003)

The Economic Impact of Dickinson College on Carlisle and Cumberland County

This project will involve completing the analysis for and writing a 40 to 70 page report on the impact of Dickinson College on Carlisle and Cumberland County. This study involves faculty and student spending surveys and several other sources of information. Results will include the College's impact on personal income, business income, government revenue and spending, and the social and cultural atmosphere of the Carlisle area. Members of my Economic Analysis of Policy course during the Spring semester will begin this project, and outstanding members of the course will have first priority for the summer research partnership. The summer partnership is required to complete an analysis of the summer activities at the college and to compile the many components of the study into a cohesive and comprehensive final report.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: William Bellinger


Grant Michael Violanti (2004)

The Economic Impact of the U.S. Army War College

The U.S. Army War College is a unique combination of military base, educational institution, think tank, and historical site. As such, the analysis of its economic effects proved very challenging- One unique aspect of the post is its dual identity. In this paper the terms Carlisle Barracks and U.S.. Army War College will be used interchangeably, although the two have been synonymous for just over 50 years, a relatively short time in the long history of the Barracks.. Another unique aspect is its educational function, which significantly affects the post's personnel profile. Compared to most military bases, the Carlisle Barracks' employees include a large percentage of officers among the military and a very high percentage of civilian employees if local contractors are included. At less than 3%.of a square mile, it is also among the smallest military bases in the nation. This paper analyzes the economic impact of the U.S Army War College through a combination of statistics provided by War College Officials, results from a survey of barracks residents, general statistical information, and models of regional and county economies provided by the Bureau of Economic Analysis of the U.S. Department of Commerce. The results are impressive, particularly for a smaller facility. For example, the post directly or indircctly provides about 10 percent of the total income and earnings and nearly 8 percent of the total jobs in the Carlisle area.

Term Funded:Spring 2004
Professor: William Bellinger


Jonathan Kerry Waller (1992)

Testing the Regulatory Threat Hypothesis: Oil Markets in 1990-91

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1991
Professor: Steven Erfle


Jue Wang (2012)

Two projects: (1) Causes of the retail gap in Smaller Central Cities, with emphasis on Pennsylvania Cities; (2) The economic impact of Dickinson Summer Programs

(1) Jue Wang and I have worked for about a year on multiple research projects related to urban inner city retail services. It is well known that some of our major cities lack adequate retail services in poorer neighborhoods which are often refered to as retail gaps. However, little work has been done on determining the causes of these gaps, or studying retail gaps in smaller cities. Our work does both, using a data set of over 60 small to mid-sized U.S. cities. We already have a revise and resubmit judgment on one paper from the Journal of Urban Economics (the leading journal in the field), which we are working on now. The summer project will involve two additional issues: (1) the comparison of 2 different measures of retail revenue, one of which we will collect in the next few weeks, and (2) a paper devoted to Pennsylvania cities. ....... The economic impact of Dickinson College summer programs will complete the impact study being undertaken this semester as a community research project by my senior seminar students and myself. It will involve surveying the spending patterns of summer program participants and instructors, and should be a relatively small part of both our summer research and the overall economic impact study of the college.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: William Bellinger


Jue Wang (2012)

Retail Shortages in Pennsylvania Inner City Neighborhoods: Evidence and Policy Proposals

Central neighborhoods in Pennsylvania cities and boroughs usually contain more income density (income per unit of geographic area) than peripheral areas with higher median household incomes. High levels of income density exist in inner city neighborhoods because the higher population density in these neighborhoods outweighs the higher average household incomes in suburban areas. There are four goals for this summer research project. The first goal for this research project is to identify statistically the income density patterns for our area's towns and cities. This will be accomplished using data that has already been collected. Secondly, we will identify areas that are underserved by the retail sector and possible retail opportunities in or near inner city neighborhoods. We will then share these results with county and local development officials and area retail executives. Finally, with their guidance, we will design preliminary central city retail development plans for a select number of cities and boroughs. The study will be undertaken by William Bellinger, Associate Professor of Economics at Dickinson College, and Jue Wang, student researcher on the project and an undergraduate economics major at Dickinson College. The duties of the primary and student researchers will be as follows: the primary researcher will guide the analysis of data, interpretation of field visits and interviews, and the final writing of all reports. The student researcher will collect additional data for a few regional cities that are not in the current data sets, compile journals of all interviews and field trips, write specific sections of our case study reports, and act as a co-author of at least some of the final reports on individual cities, and possibly on published articles as well. The merging of economic analysis and development policy specifically for our region's inner city neighborhoods could prove very fruitful for both development opportunities and the quality of life in our central cities.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: William Bellinger


Jue Wang (2012)

The Causes of the Retail Gap in Smaller U.S. Cities, and related papers.

Jue Wang (a junior economics and mathematics major) and I have been pursuing both general research and local case studies regarding the significance and causes of a relative lack of retail stores in inner city neighborhoods. I am applying for a Dana Research Internship related to this project. Our goal during my spring semester sabbatical is to submit three or four related papers on this topic to various economics or urban development journals. The first paper is an empirical paper which finds that inner city neighborhoods have a significantly lower per capita access to retail, but only for neighborhoods with a high African-American population. The second is a theoretical and empirical paper that explores the related topic of the geographic density of stores (stores or store revenue per square mile, for example) in an urban context. The third will explore the urban retail gap in the Northeastern U.S. using a subset of the national data and our original market area model. (new paragraph) We expect these papers to be completed and submitted before spring break, so our additional time will be spent on one or more of a set of related projects. In the summer of 2009 we completed a case study of access to retail in the South Allison Hill neighborhood of Harrisburg. When time permits we will explore the possibility of conducting similar case studies for one or two other PA cities. These projects would require cooperation from someone working for the State of PA, since full access to the needed retail data is only available to State employees. We have contacts at the State Department of Community Development who we have contacted regarding this project. We also have an older paper that explores the concept of "income density" (income per unit of geography) as a device for economic and market area a

Term Funded:Spring 2011
Professor: William Bellinger


Qian Zhang (2012)

Innovation by London's Water Companies: Internalizing public health externalities

Public health concerns played a major role in driving the trend away from private ownership of waterworks and towards public ownership. In London this transition took longer than in most British cities with London's eight water companies remaining privately owned until 1902. This paper looks at the investment in research and development and other innovations undertaken by some of London's water companies as a way of improving water quality and, therefore, improving public health. The paper also reinforces some recent literature suggesting that piped water quality is more localized than often assumed in the literature: one person's likelihood of contracting water borne diseases depends mostly on the quality of their own piped water not the quality of that in the city as a whole. The most innovative companies provided customers with higher quality water. I have already completed regressions using detailed data from London's three largest cholera epidemics. The goal of the Dana research work is to expand the analysis to other water borne diseases, particularly typhoid and diarrhoea & dysentery. My data sources are those gathered by William Farr as statistician to London's registrar general. The data is only available in paper form. The research assistant will help me enter the data, run regressions and assess findings.

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Nicola Tynan


Education

Lauren Marie Amoros (2012)

Studying Adolescent English Language Learners' Literacy Development through a Summer Writing Program

In conjunction with the Lincoln Intermediate Unit Migrant Education Program (LIUMEP) in Adams County, Pennsylvania, this study relates to a Young Writers Program (YWP) for adolescent English Language Learners (ELLs). Young Writers Programs (YWPs) are summer enrichment programs for students. This study was conducted during a two week YWP in the summer of 2009 as a part of the LIUMEP's existing "Summer School of Excellence 2009" which serves an ELL population consisting primarily of students whose first language is Spanish. Research findings may make significant contributions to the fields of secondary English education and teacher preparation - particularly as they related to ELL literacy instruction - by deepening the understanding of how a YWP may influence adolescent ELLs' (1) varied responses to literature-, multimedia-, and multimodal-based texts; (2) literacy skills in their first and/or second language; and (3) contribution to the development of a social and writing community with their peers and teachers.

Term Funded:Year 2010
Professor: Elizabeth Lewis


Lauren Marie Amoros (2012)

Studying Adolescent English Language Learners' Literacy Development through a Summer Writing Program

In conjunction with the Lincoln Intermediate Unit Migrant Education Program (LIUMEP) in Adams County, Pennsylvania, this study relates to a Young Writers Program (YWP) for adolescent English Language Learners (ELLs). Young Writers Programs (YWPs) are summer enrichment programs for youth. This study has been conducted over the past three years in the forms of a one and two week YWP during the LIUMEP's annual "Summer School of Excellence" program, serving an ELL population consisting primarily of students whose first language is Spanish. Research findings may make significant contributions to the fields of secondary English education and teacher preparation - particularly as they related to ELL literacy instruction - by deepening the understanding of how a YWP may influence adolescent ELLs' (1) varied responses to literature-, multimedia-, and multimodal-based texts; (2) literacy skills in their first and/or second language; and (3) contribution to the development of a social and writing community with their peers and teachers.

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Elizabeth Lewis


Lauren Marie Amoros (2012)

Young Writers Program for Adolescent English Language Learners - Summer 2011

In conjunction with the Lincoln Intermediate Unit Migrant Education Program (LIUMEP) in Adams County, Pennsylvania, this study relates to a Young Writers Program (YWP) for adolescent English Language Learners (ELLs). Young Writers Programs (YWPs) are summer enrichment programs for students. This study will be conducted over eight weeks in the summer of 2011 as part of the LIUMEP's annual "Summer School of Excellence" serving an ELL population consisting primarily of students whose first language is Spanish. This summer study will be the third year of this continuing research project. Research findings may make significant contributions to the fields of secondary English education and teacher preparation - particularly related to ELL literacy instruction - due to the unique collaboration of teacher educator/pre-service teacher in the approach to designing and implementing this study and the longitudinal nature of this on-going research. Potential findings include more nuanced understandings of how YWPs may influence adolescent ELLs' (1) varied responses to literature-, multimedia-, and multimodal-based texts; (2) literacy skills in their first and/or second language; (3) identity exploration; and (4) contributions to developing social and writing communities with their peers and teachers.

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: Elizabeth Lewis


Lauren Marie Amoros (2012)

Young Writers Program for Adolescent English Language Learners - Summer 2012

In conjuction with the Lincoln Intermediate Unit Migrant Education Program (LIUMEP) in Adams County, PA, this study relates to a Young Writers Program (YWP) for adolescent English language learners (ELLs). Young Writers Programs (YWPs) are summer enrichment programs for students. This study will be conducted over eight weeks in the summer of 2012 as part of the LIUMEP's annual "Summer School of Excellence" serving an ELL population consisting primarily of students whose first language is Spanish. This summer program will be the fourth phase of a longitudinal study. Findings may contribute significantly to the fields of secondary English, literacy education, teacher preparation, and ELL literacy instruction due to (1) the unique collaboration of teacher educator/practitioner in their approach to designing and implementing this study, and (2) the longitudinal nature of the research. Potential findings include more nuanced understandings of how YWPs may influence adolescent ELLs' varied responses to literature-, multimedia-, and multimodal-based texts; literacy skills in their first and/or second languages; identity exploration; and contributions to developing social and writing communities with their peers and teachers.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Elizabeth Lewis


Eliza Rose Park (2011)

Young Writers Program for English Language Learner (ELLs) - Summer 2010

In conjunction with the Lincoln Intermediate Unit Migrant Education Program (LIUMEP) in Adams County, Pennsylvania, this study relates to a Young Writers Program (YWP) for adolescent English Language Learners (ELLs). Young Writers Programs (YWPs) are summer enrichment programs for students. This study will be conducted over eight weeks in the summer of 2010 as part of the LIUMEP's annual "Summer School of Excellence" serving an ELL population consisting primarily of students whose first language is Spanish. Research findings may make significant contributions to the fields of secondary English education and teacher preparation - particularly related to ELL literacy instruction - due to the unique collaboration of teacher educator/pre-service teacher in the approach to designing and implementing this study. Potential findings include more nuanced understandings of how YWPs may influence adolescent ELLs' (1) varied responses to literature-, multimedia-, and multimodal-based texts; (2) literacy skills in their first and/or second language; and (3) contributions to developing social and writing communities with their peers and teachers.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Elizabeth Lewis


Meghan V Steffanci (2006)

Integrating Women's History in an 8th-Grade American History Course

This project has two components. First, a team of educators including a teacher educator from Dickinson, a preservice teacher from Dickinson, and an inservice teacher from Lamberton Middle School, will develop a pilot program for integrating women's history into the Carlisle Area School District's 8th grade Early American History curriculum. Second, the Dickinson teacher educator, acting as a participant observer, will use the project as a case study to examine the collaborative process of these educators as they construct and implement the program and to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the program from the perspectives of the teachers involved. The goal is to develop a model for effective integration that can be shared with the broader educational community.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Sarah Bair


Lindsey Hope Stum (2014)

Tracing the Literacy Development and Practices of Migrant & English Language Learning Youth through a Summer Writing Program

This project is based on a collective case study of a Young Writers Program (YWP), a summer enrichment program, for migrant and English language learning (ELL) youth in south central Pennsylvania. Implemented over two week intervals each summer between 2009 and 2013, more than 200 migrant and ELL children whose native languages include Spanish, Urdu, Vietnamese, Somali, and Arabic participated in the YWPs. Participants engage in writing using journals and multimodal/multimedia texts while working toward creating a final YWP anthology of written work as well as a variety of digital texts (e.g., digital stories, graphic novel-style personal narratives). On-going data analysis has yielded findings related to ELL literacy practices/development (e.g., mono-/bi-/multilingualism) identity exploration, and recognition of agency through social action. This study seeks to contribute to the fields of adolescent literacy, ELL literacy/instruction, critical pedagogy, culturally responsive teaching, and secondary English language arts instruction by deepening the understanding of how multi-genre/-modal/-media language arts instruction may influence migrant and ELL youths' (1) language arts skills; (2) abilities to respond to a variety of prompts and texts in multiple genres and modes; (3) exploration of identity through, and participation in, a peer community; and (4) sense of empowerment and agency.

Term Funded:Fall 2013
Professor: Elizabeth Lewis


Thomas Brendan von Allmen (2012)

History of the Scotland School for Veterans' Children

This project is part of an ongoing study of the Scotland School for Veterans' Children which was founded in Scotland, PA in 1895 and closed as a result of state budget cuts in 2009. During my pre-tenure sabbatical in fall 2008, I worked on the background period leading up the founding of the school in 1895 and conducted some research on the school itself. My plan for this summer is to continue my research on the school as I work toward a book-length manuscript to submit for publication. Working with a Dana Research Assistant, my goal is to complete my review of the school's annual reports housed in the PA State Archives in Harrisburg, to examine the school's newspapers also housed in the State Archives, and to research press accounts of the school throughout its history. As time permits, I will also continue my interviews (a process begun during my sabbatical) of SSVC alumni and former employees. Finally, Laura and I will continue reading and annotating related literature throughout the summer.

Term Funded: 2011
Professor: Sarah Bair


English

Emily Elizabeth Arndt (2013)

A Romantic Natural History (hypertext resource)

Romantic Natural History is a hypertext resource (web-site) designed to survey relationships between literary works and natural history during the century before Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species (1859). The website operates like a scholarly text, with links and interlinks that allow readers to move easily from topic to topic, author to author, and from primary and secondary sources to bibliographic citations. Darwin's Origin was the culmination of decades of speculation about connections between human beings and nonhuman "nature." The expanding discourse of science-from 1750-1859-gave poets, writers, painters, illustrators, and the public powerful food for the imagination. These ideas were reflected not only in the work of natural scientists, philosophers, and theologians, but also in the images and ideas of poets, novelists, and visual artists. The site reveals how current "romantic ecology" suggests links between our own historical moment and the scientific culture of the Romantic era.

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: Ashton Nichols


Lisa Maria Borsellino (2014)

Mid-century Suspension

"Midcentury Suspension" offers a new literary history of the decade after World War II. Typically described as seing either the end of modernism or the beginning of postmodernism, the midcentury period in fact had its own distinctive literary character. I argue that "suspension," broadly conceived, provides a more substantive, specific, and effective way to think about the literary midcentury--and, in the end, about twentieth-century literature and criticism as a whole.

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Claire Bowen-Seiler


Bronwyn Jones Bosse (1994)

Silencing other Selves, The Wordsworthian Autobiographer

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: Ash Nichols


Holly Madine Bowers (2012)

Bibliographic and Archival Research for Book Project "Impossible Year"

This project supports Moffat's proposal tentatively entitled "1917: Impossible Year"-- a social biography of four writers who were impelled to decisive action by the circumstances of World War I.This semester I'm teaching a senior seminar"The Great War Imagined" in preparation for this research; over last summer began to read widely in the field. Now I need to regularize what I've accomplished, and frame out a foundation on which to work next year. In preparation for my 2012-13 sabbatical, I would like to work with a student to 1. build a timeline of historical events from primary sources (principally the Times [London] on microfilm) ; 2. create an Endnote [field-based bibliographical data software] bibliography of the approximatey 200 resources I have read and gathered thus far and 3. Begin preliminary archival work on one of my four biographical subjects for the book--Elizabeth Shepley Sergeant, who has significance correspondence in the Morgan Library in NYC, and the Beinecke at Yale. At this stage it seems crucial to work collaboratively with a relative beginner, so that the assumptions and premises on which I build my inquiry can be examined from the ground up. Working with an advanced student will allow her or him to see advanced interdisciplinary research in action; to be exposed to archival study; to develop punctilious record-keeping of the process of research; to have a dialogue about problems and decisions in framing and solving literary critical problems.This will not be dogsbody work for the student.

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Wendy Moffat


John Edward Costango (1993)

Student Co-direction of the Writing Component of the FOCUS program

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1991
Professor: Judy Gill


Thomas Bradley Elrod (2008)

'Heavenly Perspective': Thomas Traherne and Seventeenth-Century Visual Tradition

Unique for a major English writer, Thomas Traherne's (1637-71) complete works have never been in print. Most remarkable, within the past ten years, two of his most important manuscripts have been discovered, one at the Folger Library, and one at the Lambeth Palace Library in London. Two complete editions of Traherne are now coming out, one from Oxford University Press. The first collection of essays on Traherne appears on August 23rd, and my essay on the Lambeth Palace ms. is the most substantial in the collection. In addition to the essay, I have a draft of a book manuscript on the poet and prose writer, arguing that his works celebrating naïve childhood actually entail a sophisticated critique and revision of the visual media crucial to beginning the English Civil War between spectacle-despising Puritans and opulent Royalists. The Puritans, for example, beheaded Charles I on the porch of his theatre. Connecting Traherne politically is a major revisionist reading of his work, which most readers have seen through lenses of mysticism and conformist Christianity. Thus far, I have sent out 4 proposals; both Catholic University Press and Ashgate Press have asked to review the manuscript.

Term Funded:Year 2008
Professor: Carol Ann Johnston


David Edward Emerick (2005)

A Study of Contemporary Scottish Fiction

The purpose of this grant is to prepare for a book-length study on contemporary Scottish fiction. Scots are writing some of the most interesting and challenging work in English. Unfortunately, evidence suggests that little critical attention has been paid to this body of work. In order for the student and I to evaluate competing possible approaches to the material, we will research in the library and on the web to identify possible primary authors to be included, collect contemporary reviews, compile an annotated bibliography in order to assess what's already been done and identify the critical lacunae, and evaluate applicable critical methods. It will also be important to conceive of possible subsets of contemporary Scottish fiction (detective fiction, for example). We will then assess the viability of competing possible projects and propose appropriate structures and methods. The ultimate goal is to have a project in process for a 2006-07 sabbatical.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Robert Winston


David Edward Emerick (2005)

Writing about Rape: The Economics of Fantasy

I am working on a book manuscript examining the changing representations of heterosexual rape in 20th century literature. My central thesis is that 20th century high-brow images of rape chart the imagined relationship of the masculized Western subject to the evolving forms of power and money in the US and Europe. Thanks in large part to the Mellon granted to Katie Ginn and myself 2 years ago, that manuscript has been (almost) completed and has been tentatively picked up by Ohio State University Press. The Press does want some revisions, most notably further theorization of masculine fantasy, particularly in the context of race. What I propose, then, is a summer of intensive research in contemporary theories of masculine subjectivity and race. I realize that I will need to advertise for the student position if I receive this grant. Nonetheless, I do have a student in mind (perhaps more accurately, I have a type of student in mind). Dave Emerick is currently working on his senior thesis (a year early). To do so, he is already reading deeply in precisely the type of critical theory I will be working with, and so I think that he, or a student like him, will be ready for this level of study.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Sharon Stockton


Amanda Elizabeth Eveler (2001)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Year 2000
Professor: Wendy Moffat


George Whitfield Fitting (2010)

Bibliographic Entry for Forster Biography

I request a Dana Student Research Assistant (4 hours per week) to collate and do data entry for the bibliography for my biography of E.M. Forster. ("A Great Unrecorded History": A New Life of E.M. Forster, forthcoming in summer 2008, Farrar Straus & Giroux. Last year, when I received the contract, I purchased and began to use Endnote, a state of the art integrated field-specific software compatible with FSG's indexing system. At present have only 387 entries (from research last year). I need help coordinating my master bibliography of archival sources (28 pages long, with hundreds of entries) and subsequent sub-bibliographies (not compatible with Word or current software) into a single workable bibliography. Because the research uses extensive archival (unpublished) materials, data entry and bibliographic cataloguing takes some wit and methodological know-how. I will teach a student to do this. The practical work would offer a window onto the complexities of cataloguing and categorizing knowledge in the interdisciplinary field of gay social history and literary biography.

Term Funded:Spring 2007
Professor: Wendy Moffat


Katherine Kelly Ginn (2004)

Writing about Rape: The Economics of Fantasy

I am working on a book manuscript examining the changing representations of heterosexual rape in 20th century literature and academic discourse. My central thesis is that 20th century high-brow images of rape chart the imagined relationship of the masculinized Western subject to the evolving forms of power and money in the US and Europe. This imagined relationship is not a static one but rather shifts in parallel with the general movement in 20th century culture toward an information-based global economy. Late 20th century feminist retellings of the rape story, then, articulate not only an undermining of the partriarchal narrative--although certainly they do this--but register the extent to which the meaning of "human" has changed radically by virtue of a new workforce and a new world order. This project is unique in that it treats the representation of rape as a fluid one, historically driven, dependent on a shifting vision of the self in relation to economic and political forms.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Sharon Stockton


Sara Nichole Hoover (2003)

Forster in America

The life and work of the British novelist E. M. Forster (1879-1971) is being reevaluated in the light of the posthumous publication of fiction on gay themes, and an authorized biography which openly treated his gay life. As part of a book-length treatment of the evolution of Forster's gay identity over seven decades I have begun archival work and oral histories of the unexplored chapter of Forster's life when he visited America for the first time, at 70, in the late 1940s. We propose to develop the research already in progress by reading the unmined papers of Forster's American friends in major archives in New York and New Haven, and to write a 30-40 page chapter which argues the seminal importance of America and these friendships in the development of Forster's writing, and the study of gay social history in the 20th century.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Wendy Moffat


Meredith Leigh Milnes (2011)

False Starts: The Rhetoric of Failure and the Making of American Modernism

"Failure," Herman Melville famously wrote, "is the true test of greatness," a claim that has been adopted and transformed by the six authors central to my study: Melville and Susan Warner, Edith Wharton and Henry Adams, and William Faulkner and Ralph Ellison. My project regards this rhetoric of failure as a master trope of American literary and aesthetic expression, arguing that these writers responded to the economically-motivated, progress-oriented force of American modernity by consciously cultivating a language and aesthetic program that valorized failure. Conceived as a long history of American modernism, False Starts engages questions about the development of the American Renaissance canon, elite responses to the transformations of the Gilded Age, and the failed promises of African-American citizenship following emancipation and Reconstruction.

Term Funded:Year 2009
Professor: David Ball


Jason Paul Murray (1998)

The Modernist Reader: Forster's Implied Reader in Cultural Context

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: Wendy Moffat


Jason Paul Murray (1998)

The Modernist Reader: E.M. Forster's Implied Reader in Cultural context

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: Wendy Moffat


Mary Katherine Naydan (2015)

Patronage, Magazines, and the Economics of Eighteenth-Century Poetry

"Poet" is more than a job description; it is an honorific title. Not everyone who writes verses is acclaimed as a poet. So who gets to decide? Where does poetic prestige come from? In most premodern European cultures, the answer to this question was found at court, in the person of the king or queen or among courtiers, aristocrats, and clergy. Today, the power to consecrate poets has shifted away from political power centers to a diffuse network of academics, critics, publishers, foundations, prize committees, and members of the book-buying public. My research seeks to reconstruct the early eighteenth-century climacteric of this shift, focusing in particular on the invention of the magazine as a print medium. My student research collaborator and I will work in tandem to will use historical and biographical records to track how poets earned money from their work during the period, and we will use these economic data to understand the changing channels through which writers sought poetic recognition and fame.

Term Funded:summer 2013
Professor: Jacob Sider-Jost


Eliza Rose Park (2011)

False Starts: The Rhetoric of Failure and the Making of American Modernism, 1850-Present

"Failure," Herman Melville famously wrote, "is the true test of greatness," a claim that has been adopted and transformed by the six authors central to my study: Melville and Susan Warner, Edith Wharton and Henry Adams, and William Faulkner and Ralph Ellison. My project regards this rhetoric of failure as a master trope of American literary and aesthetic expression, arguing that these writers responded to the economically-motivated, progress-oriented force of American modernity by consciously cultivating a language and aesthetic program that valorized failure. Conceived as a long history of American modernism, False Starts engages questions about the development of the American Renaissance canon, elite responses to the transformations of the Gilded Age, and the failed promises of African-American citizenship following emancipation and Reconstruction.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: David Ball


Emma Jeanne Rodwin (2014)

Mid-Century Suspension

My first book project, "Midcentury Suspension," offers a new account of Anglo-American literature in the decade after the Second World War. Informed by original archival reasearch, the book both counters received narratives of modernism and contributes to the current interdisciplinary effort to come up with suppler descriptions of the twentieth-century's signature artworks.

Term Funded:summer 2013
Professor: Claire Bown-Seiler


Jennifer Lindbeck Rose (1998)

Romantic Natural History 1750-1850

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: Ash Nichols


Leah Judith Shafer (2014)

Correspondence among African-American Poets, 1960-1980

Phillips's second book investigates the political use of correspondence for American poets from 1950 to the present. The study argues for letters as a distinct and important genre by showing how they mediate between private and public writing. Correspondence provides a space in which friendly connections can become civic responsibilities, and vice versa. With this capacity, letters can advance an egalitarian agenda. But did this egalitarianism extend to a program of racial equality? Summer research will answer the question by investigating correspondence among African-American poets of the 1960s and 1970s. We will identify letter exchanges that could serve as case studies. We will investigate how African-American writers' epistolary writing advances the political goals of their poetry and other writing. We will research if and how literary critics have treated the letters of African-American poets. This work will prepare for a conference proposal, then a conference presentation, then a book chapter.

Term Funded:summer 2013
Professor: Siobhan Phillips


Melissa Lin Sturges (2017)

Rewriting Hyboria: Robert E. Howard's Conan as Intellectual Property.

This book chapter will examine how the Conan property was expanded from a series of short stories written by Robert E. Howard in the 1930s to a multi-media property including comic books, novels, films, and video games. Using the example of Conan, it will then argue for a new theory of corporate authorship and suggest new methodologies for working in this nascent field. The Dana Research Assistant will help me perform the foundational research for this chapter by assembling an annotated bibliography tracing the publication history of the Conan property.

Term Funded:Spring 2014
Professor: Steirer Gregory


Colin Myles Tripp (2014)

False Starts: The Rhetoric of Failure and the Making of American Modernism

Failure,"Herman Melville famously wrote, "is the true test of greatness," a claim that has been adopted and transformed by the eight authors central to my study: Melville and Susan Warner, Edith Wharton and Henry Adams, William Faulkner and Ralph Ellison, and F. Scott Fitzgerald and Chris Ware. My project regards this rhetoric of failure as a defining gesture of American literary and aesthetic expression, arguing that these writers responded to the economically motivated, progress-oriented force of American modernity by consciously cultivating a language and aesthetic program that valorized failure. Conceived as a long history of American modernism, False Starts engages questions about the development of the American Renaissance canon, elite responses to the demographic transformations of the Gilded Age, mid-twentieth-century responses to the failed promises of emancipation and Reconstruction, and the reemergence of the rhetoric of failure in the contemporary graphic novel.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: David Ball


Abigail Jane Watson-Popescu (2003)

Seventeenth-century English poetry

Beginning in the summer of 2002, I shall focus upon writing my book on subjectivity in Early Modern lyric poetry. The beginnings of that book, an essay on English poet Thomas Traherne (1637-66) and subjectivity ("Heavenly Perspectives, Mirrors of Eternity: Thomas Traherne's Yearning Subject") is forthcoming in the journal Criticism. While this essay has been seminal to my thinking on issues of subjectivity and Early Modern Lyric, I shall begin the book as I begin my Early Modern Poetry course, with a discussion of Petrarch, the fourteenth-century Italian poet who wrote the first sonnet sequence in a vernacular language. Early Modern literary scholar Thomas Greene argues that Petrarch established in his sonnets new way of thinking about the individual and subjectivity by making the characters individual and autobiographical, rather than representative of the medieval Christian Everyman and ideal values (Dante and Beatrice of the Divine Comedy, for example). Grounded in Greene's thesis, I shall look at English poets who struggled with Petrarchan assumptions in significant ways: Thomas Wyatt, William Shakespeare, John Donne, George Herbert, and Thomas Traherne.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Carol Ann Johnston


Emily Ann Wylie (1994)

An Introduction to the Short Fiction of American Writer Eudora Welty

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Carol Ann Johnston


Barrett William Ziegler (2016)

The End of Russian Philosophy

Between 1990 and 1991, a dramatic shift took place in Russian intellectual circles. In the span of one year, 19th c. religious thought became the dominating topic of philosophical inquiry and previously suppressed religious texts were published in the leading academic and literary journals. As part of this shift from Marxist-Leninism to religious Orthodoxy, the communist/dialectical materialist methodology, which had dominated all scholarly discourse until the final months of the Soviet empire, disappeared almost overnight from philosophical exchanges. This was unprecedented, given the nearly 75 years of state-sponsored atheism in the Soviet Union. Yet, in 2001 as the 10-year anniversary of the Soviet Union's dissolution approached, the optimism of the new intellectual freedom of the post-Soviet period began to wane. More specifically, the optimism of the 1990s had given way to widespread criticism of the state of philosophy in Russia, with Russian philosophers and intellectuals either publically denouncing Russian philosophy or denying the existence of the discipline altogether.

Term Funded:Fall 2013
Professor: Alyssa DeBlasio


Environmental Studies

Cailey Vaughn Clark (2013)

Portable PM2.5 Monitor Calibration and Validation for Diesel-Specific Air Pollution

This project will use Dickinson's existing air pollution monitors, along with unique community resources for studying air pollution, to determine the correct calibration and use of handheld monitors for studying air pollution in diesel-polluted environments. We will run handheld and stationary monitors side by side to collect adequate data (currently missing from the literature) on the proper calibration of these commonly used monitors. The short project can be completed in the summer and fall, and will substantially improve the way similar monitors are used by researchers around the world. It will also provide critical background data for the Environmental Studies Department's characterization of Carlisle's serious PM2.5 pollution problem.

Term Funded: 2011
Professor: Gregory Howard


Jeremy David Coerper (2001)

Earthwatch

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Brian Pedersen


David Kenneth Golden (2014)

Forest Farming & Agroforestry at Dickinson College Farm

This purpose of this project is to collect baseline data on the site characteristics at the woodlot at the College Farm and use this data to plan a forest farming operation as part of the agroforestry demonstration project at the farm. Agroforestry, as defined by the Natural Resources Conservation Service, is intentionally combining agriculture and forestry to create an integrated and sustainability land use. There are several types of agroforestry, all of which will be demonstrated at the farm. The goal of the agroforestry demonstration project is to show others how agroforestry can be utilized in the Mid-Atlantic region. Forest farming is the cultivation of high-value specialty crops under the protection of a forest canopy that has been modified to provide the correct shade level. These demonstration plots are extremely valuable in the north east due to the fact that small woodlots are extremely common in this area, particularly in rural areas. By teaching people about agroforestry, we can promote the utilization of their woodlots to generate additional income while maintaining the valuable ecosystem services of the woodlot. Other collaborators include Jim Ciarracca, Jen Halpin, Eugene Wingert, Scott Boback, and Carol Loeffler at Dickinson College, as well as Eric Burkhart and James Finley at Penn State University. There are also several partners associated with DCNR and NRCS.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Kristen Brubaker


Robert C Hanifin (2006)

Influence of Deer Herbivory on Light Utilization by Forests

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Brian Pedersen


Jessica L Howard (2001)

Earthwatch

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Brian Pedersen


Jessica L Howard (2001)

Understanding forest responses to environmental stresses: tree growth in response to slow and fast gaps

The death of large forest trees, which can be linked to environmental stresses (e.g. air pollution), is a critical event in forest development. By freeing resources (e.g., light) for use by other trees, the mortality of the large trees that comprise a forest's overstory influences the sizes and species of trees in a forest, and the habitat available for other forest organisms. To date, study of forest responses to the death of overstory trees has focused on tree deaths that occur suddenly and on the response of small, understory trees. Understory trees growing in a well-lit gap in the forest canopy created by the sudden death of an overstory tree often experience sharp growth increases following formation of the canopy gap. But recent research indicates that the death of overstory trees is often a decades-long process involving a gradual decline in tree vigor (and multiple environmental stresses). In this latter case, overstory trees neighboring a dying tree may expand their canopies into the slowly forming gap created by a dying tree, preventing understory trees from enjoying an increase in resources for growth. The difference between a forest's response to canopy gaps that form suddenly and gaps that form gradually may have significant long-term effects on the forest as a whole. This proposed study will characterize the rates of death of large trees (i.e., rates of canopy gap formation) and seek evidence for associated growth responses by overstory and understory trees growing near the dead trees.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Brian Pedersen


Michael Seamus Maloney (2013)

Bio-Diesel

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Alyssa DeBlasio


Sarah Lynn Pears (2004)

Response of mixed hardwood forests to gypsy herbifoy and drought; a dendroecological analysis moth.

We propose to determine (1) the timing of past outbreaks of gypsy moths and the effect of these outbreaks on the growth rates of forest trees, and (2) the effect of past droughts on the growth rates of forest trees. Gypsy moths are an exotic species known to defoliate trees and reduce tree growth rates. Droughts also reduce tree growth rates and there is concern that droughts may become more frequent in the future with climate change. Effective forest management requires site-specific information on how gypsy moths and droughts have influenced forests in the past. Our study site is the Florence Jones Reineman Sanctuary in Perry County, Pennsylvania. We will apply a combination of standard dendroecological (tree-ring) methods and novel statistical methods. Tree rings provide a long-term record of past tree growth rates. Because gypsy moths defoliate some tree species and not others, we can quantify the effect of gypsy moths by comparing the growth rates of gypsy-moth-host and nonhost trees. An available long-term climate database will allow us to simultaneously quantify past relationships between tree growth rates and drought.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Brian Pedersen


Angela M Wallis (2002)

Extreme Herbivory by Deer at Reineman Wildlife Sanctuary: Are today's forest canopy gaps the future forest?

A challenge for environmental scientists, and a test of their understanding of the environment, is to project nature's long term responses to stresses. The large deer herd at Reineman Wildlife Sanctuary (RWS) imposes a substantial stress on the RWS forest by eating most of the small, young trees. Studies have shown that protecting the small trees from deer yields more and faster growing small trees. But what are the long term effects of deer on the RWS forest? Gaps in the forest canopy, formed by the death of large trees, are normally filled when small trees grow up into the canopy. However, an ongoing study of canopy gaps at RWS suggests this is not happening. The vegetation below the gaps includes few, if any, trees capable of filling th gap. Because the death of other large trees is inevitable, more canopy gaps will form in the future. If these gaps do not fill in, the RWS forest of the future will have fewer trees and be more open, or may even cease to be a forest. The current canopy gaps at RWS provide an opportunity to study the future forest. We propose to characterize the current canopy gap vegetation at RWS and at similar forests with fewer deer. We also propose to explore other factors that may be contributing to the failure of the gap filling process. In future research we plan to link the results of this field research to the results of computer models to project the future forest at RWS.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Brian Pedersen


Thomas James Wisnewski (1989)

Analysis of Patterns and Causes of variation in PH and Alkalinity concentration in Pennsylvania Streams

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1990
Professor: Candie Wilderman


French & Italian

Julia Gabrielle Barnes (2014)

A Specter Is Haunting Italy: Representations of the Aldo Moro Affair in Cinema, Television, and Theater

I am working on a manuscript on the representations of the abduction and murder of Italian political leader Aldo Moro in 1978. Emphasizing the centrality and the persistence of the "specter" of Aldo Moro haunting Italian collective memory in several fictional venues, my book illustrates how, over the years, the representation of the Moro Affair has diverged into a variety of fictional modes that reveal the problematic definition of political violence and the clash of political and cultural forces in Italian society. My articles and presentations on this topic have received extremely positive feedback, and my "theory of the specter" is widely cited in articles and books. With this project, I am part of the 2013-2014 Penn Humanities Forum on Violence (University of Pennsylvania). I am applying for the Dana Research Assistantship because I would like to work with one of our Italian majors on copyediting, proofreading, and bibliography compiling and checking.

Term Funded:Spring 2014
Professor: Nicoletta Marini-Maio


Domenico G Di Bacco (1995)

Development of an Italian Video Program

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Tullio Pagano


Sarah Emily Hoch (2005)

Processing Instruction in the content-based Language Classroom

Processing instruction (PI) seeks to alter L2 learners' inefficient cognitive strategies by structuring input that promotes form-meaning connections in the developing system (VanPatten, 1996, 2003). Previous studies on grammatical structures in French, Spanish, and Italian show the positive effects of PI for grammatical structures that are identified as causing an processing problem for L2 learners (VanPatten, 2003). As regards the acquisition of the passive voice, observations from a qualitative pilot study by Duperron suggest that intermediate L2 learners, in accordance with the First Noun Strategy extend onto the passive voice in French the ongoing investigation of PI's role on learners' grammar acquisition. My project also includes the development of pedagogical material that delivers PI activities in the L2 content-based environment.

Term Funded:Year 2005
Professor: Lucile Duperron


Karen Elizabeth Kirner de Chazelles (2008)

Research Assistant for Toulouse Program

Research Assistant for Toulouse Program

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: Lucille Duperron


Mary Kathryn Picazio (2001)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Michael Kline


Geology

Katherine Mary Anderson (2011)

Curation of the Ellis mineral collection with emphasis on related to African resource extraction

The project will provide funding for a student to catalogue, document and identify >1000 new mineral and rock specimens donated to the Department of Geology in 2006 by an alumnus. Special emphasis will be placed on samples from Africa, several of which have already been identified, and a display showing several samples with ancillary maps and printed information will be exhibited in the Kaufman Building, focusing on the theme of mineral resource extraction in the context of African history.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Ben Edwards


Adrian J Biscontini (2006)

Yale University Helium Dating Workshop

We are embarking on a research project to fill a gap in the literature. In 1975, Gordon Tullock presented a theory to explain why losers would resist policy change. We now seek to explain why they sometimes accept compensation and why governments are willing to pay.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Adrian J Biscontini (2006)

Late Cenozoic Drainage Capture, Evolution of the Arkansas River, Central Colorado, and the Recent Cutting the Royal Gorge

Preliminary investigations have shown that the proposed chemistry will be possible but with the use of 355 nm light to initiate the photochemistry (I was not aware of this when I wrote the grant). I am therefore requesting funds to purchase four optics (two dichroic mirrors and two harmonic separators) to allow for 355 nm photolysis.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Peter Sak


Shaun Tyler Brown (2003)

Volcanism in Atka Island, Aleutians

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Gene Yogodzinski


Jessica Ann Cannon (1998)

NSF 9419240 Regional Variability in Aleutian Primitive Magmas and Implications for Processes in the Mantle Wedge: Proposal for an Ion Probe Study

n/a

Term Funded:Year 1997
Professor: Gene Yogodzinski


Jessica Ann Cannon (1998)

Development of a Three Dimensional Model of the Subsurface Stratigraphy of the Dickinson College Water Well Field

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: Marcus Key


Gordon Spencer Clark (2007)

Arsenic Occurrence in Maine Groundwater: Is it there? How did it get there? What are the risks?

Arsenic is a common constituent of many natural groundwaters. Until recently, its presence in domestic well supplies was not frequently checked. The discovery of elevated arsenic in groundwaters around the world and the emergence of serious social, economic and health consequences of ingesting this carcinogen have now become apparent. In the United States, elevated arsenic exists in many aquifers in the western states and the mid-west region causing major health concerns in this part of the country. This project aims to investigate the potential for elevated arsenic to exist in the groundwater of a popular summer town of Castine, in coastal Maine. The geology of this area indicates the potential for arsenic to be present in groundwater. Currently, many residents of Castine draw their domestic water from private wells. Collecting data on the water and rock chemistry of the area will enable recommendations to be made on the water quality, as well as providing information on similar geologic areas which may be at risk of elevated arsenic in their groundwater supplies.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Bethany O'Shea


Julie Alison Collins (1994)

Functional morphology of Trepostome bryozoans

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Marcus Key


Jonathan Wilder Cox (1997)

Spatial and Temporal Paleoclimate Reconstructions of Cyclical Early Mesozoic Age Lake Sediments from the Hartford and Newark Basins, Eastern U.S.: A Geochemical Approach

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: Jeffrey Niemitz


Chira Anneli Cratsley (2007)

Edwards NSF Grant: Using the Products of Volcano Ice Interaction to Constrain Paleo-Ice Conditions

This project involves an integrated volcanological, sedimentological, geochemical and geochronological study of mafic and intermediate-silicic glaciovolcanic and glacial deposits from the Edziza Volcanic Complex (EVC), in northern British Columbia, Canada to both constrain variations in Pleistocene ice conditions in this region and to develop the methodology of using such a study as a proxy for paleo-ice conditions/paleoclimate elsewhere in the world. Constraining temporal variation in paleo-ice presence and thickness using a multi-disciplinary study of the products of a long-lived glaciovolcanic complex represents a significant new approach to using volcanic rocks as a proxy for paleoclimate. This project would develop a methodology based on integrating datasets from glaciovolcanic and glaciogenic facies analysis, volatile and H-isotope analysis of volcanic glass, and precise 40Ar/39Ar geochronology that could be used to constrain Pleistocene ice conditions in British Columbia, and in many other glaciated volcanic areas, such as the Cascades, the Andes, iceland, west Antarctica and Siberia. North-central British Columbia is a key area for understanding the dynamics of the Cordilleran ice Sheet (C1S), as models suggest that it lay close to the central and thickest part of the C1S during the Last Glacial Maximum and was located along a major ice divide. The processes and products of mafic glaciovolcanism are well documented, but those of intermediate-silicic glaciovolcanism are much less well known. This project would also significantly increase our understanding of this style of volcano-ice interaction. Studies of volcano-ice interaction on Earth help our understanding of deposits generated by magma-ice interaction on Mars, which are recognized as important astrobiological targets.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Chira Anneli Cratsley (2007)

Origin of Magmatic Inclusions from Centre Hills Volcano, Montserrat, West Indies

Although the most recent, on-going eruption of Soufriere Hills volcano on Montserrat has been documented in detail, little work has been done to understand the plumping system by which magma moves about beneath the volcano. During a recent Dickinson College January term program, faculty and students discovered blocks of rock likely from the plumbing system beneath the Centre Hills volcano, which is immediately north of the Soufriere Hills. These blocks possibly represent fragments of volcanic conduits that supplied magma to the Centre Hills in the past and possibly to the current Soufriere Hills volcano. Field documentation of the distribution of conduit blocks coupled with laboratory studies of the chemical compositions of minerals from the blocks will allow us to begin to help reconstruct the magma plumping for the entire volcanic system by constraining magma compositions as well as temperatures and depths at which the magmas crystallized.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Chira Anneli Cratsley (2007)

NSF 0439707 RUI: Using the Products of Volcano Ice Interaction to Constrain Paleo-Ice Conditions

This project involves an integrated volcanological, sedimentological, geochemical and geochronological study of mafic and intermediate-silicic glaciovolcanic and glacial deposits from the Edziza Volcanic Complex (EVC), in northern British Columbia, Canada to both constrain variations in Pleistocene ice conditions in this region and to develop the methodology of using such a study as a proxy for paleo-ice conditions/paleoclimate elsewhere in the world. Constraining temporal variation in paleo-ice presence and thickness using a multi-disciplinary study of the products of a long-lived glaciovolcanic complex represents a significant new approach to using volcanic rocks as a proxy for paleoclimate. This project would develop a methodology based on integrating datasets from glaciovolcanic and glaciogenic facies analysis, volatile and H-isotope analysis of volcanic glass, and precise 40Ar/39Ar geochronology that could be used to constrain Pleistocene ice conditions in British Columbia, and in many other glaciated volcanic areas, such as the Cascades, the Andes, iceland, west Antarctica and Siberia. North-central British Columbia is a key area for understanding the dynamics of the Cordilleran ice Sheet (C1S), as models suggest that it lay close to the central and thickest part of the C1S during the Last Glacial Maximum and was located along a major ice divide. The processes and products of mafic glaciovolcanism are well documented, but those of intermediate-silicic glaciovolcanism are much less well known. This project would also significantly increase our understanding of this style of volcano-ice interaction. Studies of volcano-ice interaction on Earth help our understanding of deposits generated by magma-ice interaction on Mars, which are recognized as important astrobiological targets.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Alyssa Michelle Davidson (2010)

Development and Assessment of Critical Thinking Skills in First-Year Students Taking Introductory Geology Courses and Beyond

The Geology Department proposes a summer 2009 Dana Research Assistantship for Alyssa Chaplin, a junior Geology major preparing for a career in Earth Science teaching. Alyssa's understanding of the content within the Geology major and her significant interest in assessment of critical thinking and content knowledge in the Earth Sciences make her an extraordinarily well qualified student for this assistantship. Alyssa will work with the department faculty this summer to help us understand the intellectual context and science/math phobias of entering first year students with respect to engagement in earth science course. Her research will help us to revise and assess the ways we approach what and how we teach with the ultimate outcome of increasing students' scientific critical thinking skills and awareness of how the earth works in order to develop minds that are curious and attentive to the ways in which humans interact with the planet now and in the future.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Jeffrey Niemitz


John Jacob Davidson (2010)

Dana Assistantship to Support a Petrographic and Geochemical Study of Icelandic Crust

A 'tectonic window' in northern Iceland exposes the internal structure of an ancient abandoned ridge, providing important insights into the processes that construct the ocean crust. In July 2007, I acquired over 200 samples from two well-exposed upper crustal sections. Petrographic and geochemical analyses of this sample suite will complement structural and paleomagnetic investigations in the same study areas, leading to a more comprehensive understanding of oceanic crustal accretion. I propose to perform a preliminary petrographic and geochemical analysis of ~20 samples from this sample suite. A Dana Assistant would aid this study in three key areas: (1) preparation of samples, (2) data plotting, and (3) preparation of a conference presentation. These phases provide an opportunity for the student to apply analytical techniques to authentic research, analyze data in the context of existing data, and present scientific information in a meaningful way.

Term Funded:Year 2008
Professor: Meagen Pollock


Clarence Edward Dingman (2003)

Geochemistry and Mineralogy of Carbonate-enriched Black Shales: Implications for Millenial-scale Cyclicity in early Mesozoic Lake sediments, eastern US

The early Mesozoic rift basins of the eastern United States (Nova Scotia to NC) contain within their sedimentary rocks a detailed record of climate change spanning a time period of approximately 40 million years. Repeating sequences of gray-black-purple-red shales and siltstones represent wet to dry conditions caused by regular changes in the sun-earth distance relationship. Because of the eccentricities of the earth's tilt and wobble on its axis and its solar orbit, the earth is slightly closer or farther from the sun producing an increase or decrease in effective solar radiation a change in climate. These orbital forcing mechanisms have periodicities of between 21,000 and 100,000 years. The glacial-interglacial periods of the last 3 million years of earth history have been well correlated to this phenomenon. At a higher frequency (millennial-scale) there are also known to be significant climate anomalies the causes of which are poorly known. These cycles are evident in rocks of less than 100,000 but have never been seen in older rocks. This project will use well-preserved rock cores and outcrop from these Mesozoic basins to attempt to discern these millennial-scale changes and ascertain their cause. Previous work has shown significant quasi-regular bands of carbonate sediment within the black shale units in the Newark rift basin. Our objective is to determine the nature and origin of these carbonate units using chemical and mineralogical tests and statistically assess the notion that they are of sufficient regularity to be caused by climate. We will attempt to place these lithologies in a more precise time-frame to determine the duration of the carbonate events. Such information is important to our understanding of the causes of rapid climate change (order of decades) as we begin to see more and more evidence of global%

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Jeffrey Niemitz


Gwen Elizabeth Dunnington (2010)

NSF 0910712 RUI: Using the Products of Volcano Ice Interaction to Constrain Paleo-Ice Conditions

Northern British Columbia was the site of numerous glaciovolcanic eruptions during the Pleistocene, making it an ideal location to investigate interactions between volcanism and continental ice sheets. We propose to conduct a comprehensive study of 34 basaltic glaciovolcanic and subaerial centers in the Tuya-Kawdy area in northern British Columbia, Canada, to determine if fluctuations in continental ice-sheet volumes affected the eruption frequencies and compositions of Pleistocene volcanism. At each of the centers we will document the elevations of important stratigraphic markers (pillow lava, passage zones, tephra cones) to constrain paleo-ice conditions for the Cordilleran ice sheet (CIS) and collect samples for geochemical characterization and geochronology. Using GIS software, we will estimate minimum eruption volumes and volumes of material eroded in order to examine variations of eruption volumes through time. We will analyze bulk rock, glass and mineral compositions to assess whether or not they vary with ice presence/absence. Eruption ages for selected samples will be determined with high precision 40Ar/39Ar-dating to look for correlations between volcanism and CIS fluctuations as well as for comparison with the global ice volume record.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Richard William Egan (1990)

Chemostratigraphic Study of Deep Marine Shales in the Eastern U. S., and Wales, UK

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1989
Professor: Jeffrey Niemitz


Megan Garrett Gerseny (2002)

Volcanism in Atka Island, Aleutians

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Gene Yogodzinski


James Paul Haklar (2011)

NSF 0910712 RUI: Using the Products of Volcano Ice Interaction to Constrain Paleo-Ice Conditions

Northern British Columbia was the site of numerous glaciovolcanic eruptions during the Pleistocene, making it an ideal location to investigate interactions between volcanism and continental ice sheets. We propose to conduct a comprehensive study of 34 basaltic glaciovolcanic and subaerial centers in the Tuya-Kawdy area in northern British Columbia, Canada, to determine if fluctuations in continental ice-sheet volumes affected the eruption frequencies and compositions of Pleistocene volcanism. At each of the centers we will document the elevations of important stratigraphic markers (pillow lava, passage zones, tephra cones) to constrain paleo-ice conditions for the Cordilleran ice sheet (CIS) and collect samples for geochemical characterization and geochronology. Using GIS software, we will estimate minimum eruption volumes and volumes of material eroded in order to examine variations of eruption volumes through time. We will analyze bulk rock, glass and mineral compositions to assess whether or not they vary with ice presence/absence. Eruption ages for selected samples will be determined with high precision 40Ar/39Ar-dating to look for correlations between volcanism and CIS fluctuations as well as for comparison with the global ice volume record.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Gretchen N Hancock (1991)

Rare Element Geochemistry of Sediments in the Gulf of California Oxygen Minimum Zone

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1990
Professor: Jeffrey Niemitz


Gretchen N Hancock (1991)

Geology and Geochemistry of Metavolic Rock of the Catoctin Formation, South -Central Pennsylvania

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1989
Professor: Scott Petersen


Trent Mowbray Harrison (1994)

Paleoenvironmental Reconstruction of Middle to Late Ordovician Black Shales, SW Wales, UK: A Chemostratigraphic Approach

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Jeffrey Niemitz


Donald James Hartman (2000)

NSF 9616776 Collaborative Research: Ice-Core Analysis & Physical Glaciology of the Galena Creek Rock Glacier, Wyoming

1) Repeated, high-resolution surveys of the Galena Creek Rock Glacier over a five year period, resulting in the best motion survey of a rock glacier ever completed. The surveys allowed us to determine rates of ablation beneath the debris mantle over the whole rock glacier surface. Additionally, reconnaissance surveys and photo resurveys of Sulphur Creek Rock Glacier, a larger and possibly older feature near Galena Creek.

Term Funded:Year 2000
Professor: Noel Potter


Donald James Hartman (2000)

NSF 9616776 Collaborative Research: Ice-Core Analysis & Physical Glaciology of the Galena Creek Rock Glacier, Wyoming

1) Repeated, high-resolution surveys of the Galena Creek Rock Glacier over a five year period, resulting in the best motion survey of a rock glacier ever completed. The surveys allowed us to determine rates of ablation beneath the debris mantle over the whole rock glacier surface. Additionally, reconnaissance surveys and photo resurveys of Sulphur Creek Rock Glacier, a larger and possibly older feature near Galena Creek.

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Noel Potter


Donald James Hartman (2000)

NSF 9616776 Collaborative Research: Ice-Core Analysis & Physical Glaciology of the Galena Creek Rock Glacier, Wyoming

1) Repeated, high-resolution surveys of the Galena Creek Rock Glacier over a five year period, resulting in the best motion survey of a rock glacier ever completed. The surveys allowed us to determine rates of ablation beneath the debris mantle over the whole rock glacier surface. Additionally, reconnaissance surveys and photo resurveys of Sulphur Creek Rock Glacier, a larger and possibly older feature near Galena Creek.

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Noel Potter


Donald James Hartman (2000)

Ice-Core Analysis and Physical Glaciology of Galena Creek Rock Glacier, Wyoming

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Noel Potter


Donald James Hartman (2000)

Ice-core Analysis and Physical Glaciology of Galena Creek Rock Glacier Wyoming

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Noel Potter


Courtney Elizabeth Haynes (2009)

Nutrient and Trace Element fluxes from Legacy Sediment Release: Implications for the environmental degradation of the Chesapeake Bay

Legacy sediments once trapped behind centuries-old mill dams in southeastern PA are now being released to streams due to dam degradation or removal. Depending on land-use these sediment repositories contained large mass accumulations of nutrients and/or bioavailable trace elements. This study within the Yellow Breeches Creek watershed (YBCW) of Cumberland County, PA attempts to model the natural elemental flux from non-agricultural and non-urbanized areas in contrast to that from agricultural and urbanizing areas of the watershed. The YBCW contains definable area of forested, agricultural and urban land use, each of which includes legacy sediment deposits. We propose a two-part study: 1) to determine the historical mass accumulation of nutrients and bioavailable trace elements in legacy sediment volumes and 2) to determine the flux of nutrients and trace elements by land use from these repositories by analyzing the suspended and dissolved load of stream cutting through the legacy sediments presently.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Jeffrey Niemitz


Courtney Elizabeth Haynes (2009)

NSF 0439707 RUI: Using the Products of Volcano Ice Interaction to Constrain Paleo-Ice Conditions

This project involves an integrated volcanological, sedimentological, geochemical and geochronological study of mafic and intermediate-silicic glaciovolcanic and glacial deposits from the Edziza Volcanic Complex (EVC), in northern British Columbia, Canada to both constrain variations in Pleistocene ice conditions in this region and to develop the methodology of using such a study as a proxy for paleo-ice conditions/paleoclimate elsewhere in the world. Constraining temporal variation in paleo-ice presence and thickness using a multi-disciplinary study of the products of a long-lived glaciovolcanic complex represents a significant new approach to using volcanic rocks as a proxy for paleoclimate. This project would develop a methodology based on integrating datasets from glaciovolcanic and glaciogenic facies analysis, volatile and H-isotope analysis of volcanic glass, and precise 40Ar/39Ar geochronology that could be used to constrain Pleistocene ice conditions in British Columbia, and in many other glaciated volcanic areas, such as the Cascades, the Andes, iceland, west Antarctica and Siberia. North-central British Columbia is a key area for understanding the dynamics of the Cordilleran ice Sheet (C1S), as models suggest that it lay close to the central and thickest part of the C1S during the Last Glacial Maximum and was located along a major ice divide. The processes and products of mafic glaciovolcanism are well documented, but those of intermediate-silicic glaciovolcanism are much less well known. This project would also significantly increase our understanding of this style of volcano-ice interaction. Studies of volcano-ice interaction on Earth help our understanding of deposits generated by magma-ice interaction on Mars, which are recognized as important astrobiological targets.

Term Funded:Fall 2007
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Courtney Elizabeth Haynes (2009)

NSF 0439707 RUI: Using the Products of Volcano Ice Interaction to Constrain Paleo-Ice Conditions

This project involves an integrated volcanological, sedimentological, geochemical and geochronological study of mafic and intermediate-silicic glaciovolcanic and glacial deposits from the Edziza Volcanic Complex (EVC), in northern British Columbia, Canada to both constrain variations in Pleistocene ice conditions in this region and to develop the methodology of using such a study as a proxy for paleo-ice conditions/paleoclimate elsewhere in the world. Constraining temporal variation in paleo-ice presence and thickness using a multi-disciplinary study of the products of a long-lived glaciovolcanic complex represents a significant new approach to using volcanic rocks as a proxy for paleoclimate. This project would develop a methodology based on integrating datasets from glaciovolcanic and glaciogenic facies analysis, volatile and H-isotope analysis of volcanic glass, and precise 40Ar/39Ar geochronology that could be used to constrain Pleistocene ice conditions in British Columbia, and in many other glaciated volcanic areas, such as the Cascades, the Andes, iceland, west Antarctica and Siberia. North-central British Columbia is a key area for understanding the dynamics of the Cordilleran ice Sheet (C1S), as models suggest that it lay close to the central and thickest part of the C1S during the Last Glacial Maximum and was located along a major ice divide. The processes and products of mafic glaciovolcanism are well documented, but those of intermediate-silicic glaciovolcanism are much less well known. This project would also significantly increase our understanding of this style of volcano-ice interaction. Studies of volcano-ice interaction on Earth help our understanding of deposits generated by magma-ice interaction on Mars, which are recognized as important astrobiological targets.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Whitney Noel Hoffman (2009)

Relationship Among Rough Crust Subduction, Interseismic Coupling, and Quaternary Uplift Rates, Osa Peninsula, Costa Rica

Approximately 40% of the global population is concentrated along tectonic plate boundaries. These boundaries which comprise ~15% of the earth's surface release ~90% of the seismic energy. As such, understanding the relationship between deformation over the long-term (thousands of years) and human timescales is essential understanding seismic hazards associated with plate boundary deformation. This proposed research will attempt to mesh long-term (geologically constrained) rates of plate boundary deformation with existing short-term global positioning system constrained rates of plate boundary deformation. Specifically, the goals of this proposal are: (1) to map the spatial distribution of a <50,000 year old accumulation of marine sediment, across of the southern coast of the Osa Peninsula in Costa Rica, and (2) to radiocarbon date shells collected from the deposits. Dated exposures of the late Pleistocene marine sediment will be used to constrain the long term rates and magnitudes of vertical motion across the Osa peninsula.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Peter Sak


Arika Brooke Hunt (1997)

Preparation for attendance at American Geophysical Union Chapman Conference on Rock Glaciers, NW Wyoming.

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: Noel Potter


Margaret Scott Jackson (2007)

Constraints on Regional-scale Deformation across the Pennsylvania Salient as Deduced from Geologic Cross-Sections.

A field-based investigation across the valley and ridge physiographic province along the Susquehanna river valley. Here, the south-flowing river is oriented essentially perpendicular to the east-west tending Appalachian mountains. Folded and faulted Paleozoic rocks are exposed in the riverbed, roadcuts along both the east and west banks of the river, in quarries, and throughout agricultural and forested lands of the valley. By constructing a detailed geologic swath map along the shores of the river, working with a Dickinson undergraduate geology major, the project will constrain the amount of tectonic shortening between Harrisburg and Williamsport. The results of this mapping effort will be used to construct a balanced geological cross section.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Peter Sak


Robert Allan Jansen (2011)

NSF 0910712 RUI: Using the Products of Volcano Ice Interaction to Constrain Paleo-Ice Conditions

Northern British Columbia was the site of numerous glaciovolcanic eruptions during the Pleistocene, making it an ideal location to investigate interactions between volcanism and continental ice sheets. We propose to conduct a comprehensive study of 34 basaltic glaciovolcanic and subaerial centers in the Tuya-Kawdy area in northern British Columbia, Canada, to determine if fluctuations in continental ice-sheet volumes affected the eruption frequencies and compositions of Pleistocene volcanism. At each of the centers we will document the elevations of important stratigraphic markers (pillow lava, passage zones, tephra cones) to constrain paleo-ice conditions for the Cordilleran ice sheet (CIS) and collect samples for geochemical characterization and geochronology. Using GIS software, we will estimate minimum eruption volumes and volumes of material eroded in order to examine variations of eruption volumes through time. We will analyze bulk rock, glass and mineral compositions to assess whether or not they vary with ice presence/absence. Eruption ages for selected samples will be determined with high precision 40Ar/39Ar-dating to look for correlations between volcanism and CIS fluctuations as well as for comparison with the global ice volume record.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


AlexandraSelene Jarvis (2010)

U/Th-He dating of xenoliths from Tsekone Ridge and the Centre Hills

Determining the ages of volcanic eruptions is very important for helping to predict when a future eruption might take place as well as for recording past climatic conditions. For example, if a volcano eruptions while it is surrounded by ice (glaciovolcanic eruption), distinctive types of lava flows are produced. If the ice later melts, the lava flows serve as a record that ice was present at the time of eruption. This proposal seeks funding to send a Dickinson student to attend a special research opportunity (HeDWaAZ) at the University of Arizona for two weeks this summer to learn how to determine the ages of rocks (xenoliths) carried by lava to the surface of the earth. Two years ago I sent a student to attend a similar seminar at Yale University, and the results of the student's work were recently published in a very high profile earth science journal, Geology.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


AlexandraSelene Jarvis (2010)

NSF 0439707 RUI: Using the Products of Volcano Ice Interaction to Constrain Paleo-Ice Conditions

This project involves an integrated volcanological, sedimentological, geochemical and geochronological study of mafic and intermediate-silicic glaciovolcanic and glacial deposits from the Edziza Volcanic Complex (EVC), in northern British Columbia, Canada to both constrain variations in Pleistocene ice conditions in this region and to develop the methodology of using such a study as a proxy for paleo-ice conditions/paleoclimate elsewhere in the world. Constraining temporal variation in paleo-ice presence and thickness using a multi-disciplinary study of the products of a long-lived glaciovolcanic complex represents a significant new approach to using volcanic rocks as a proxy for paleoclimate. This project would develop a methodology based on integrating datasets from glaciovolcanic and glaciogenic facies analysis, volatile and H-isotope analysis of volcanic glass, and precise 40Ar/39Ar geochronology that could be used to constrain Pleistocene ice conditions in British Columbia, and in many other glaciated volcanic areas, such as the Cascades, the Andes, iceland, west Antarctica and Siberia. North-central British Columbia is a key area for understanding the dynamics of the Cordilleran ice Sheet (C1S), as models suggest that it lay close to the central and thickest part of the C1S during the Last Glacial Maximum and was located along a major ice divide. The processes and products of mafic glaciovolcanism are well documented, but those of intermediate-silicic glaciovolcanism are much less well known. This project would also significantly increase our understanding of this style of volcano-ice interaction. Studies of volcano-ice interaction on Earth help our understanding of deposits generated by magma-ice interaction on Mars, which are recognized as important astrobiological targets.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Andrew Brainard Judd (1993)

Macroevolutionary Patterns in Fossil Bryozoans

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1991
Professor: Marcus Key


Christopher Kendall Junium (2000)

NSF 9616776 Collaborative Research: Ice-Core Analysis & Physical Glaciology of the Galena Creek Rock Glacier, Wyoming

1) Repeated, high-resolution surveys of the Galena Creek Rock Glacier over a five year period, resulting in the best motion survey of a rock glacier ever completed. The surveys allowed us to determine rates of ablation beneath the debris mantle over the whole rock glacier surface. Additionally, reconnaissance surveys and photo resurveys of Sulphur Creek Rock Glacier, a larger and possibly older feature near Galena Creek.

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: Noel Potter


Gregory Everett Lasher (2011)

NSF 0910712 RUI: Using the Products of Volcano Ice Interaction to Constrain Paleo-Ice Conditions

Northern British Columbia was the site of numerous glaciovolcanic eruptions during the Pleistocene, making it an ideal location to investigate interactions between volcanism and continental ice sheets. We propose to conduct a comprehensive study of 34 basaltic glaciovolcanic and subaerial centers in the Tuya-Kawdy area in northern British Columbia, Canada, to determine if fluctuations in continental ice-sheet volumes affected the eruption frequencies and compositions of Pleistocene volcanism. At each of the centers we will document the elevations of important stratigraphic markers (pillow lava, passage zones, tephra cones) to constrain paleo-ice conditions for the Cordilleran ice sheet (CIS) and collect samples for geochemical characterization and geochronology. Using GIS software, we will estimate minimum eruption volumes and volumes of material eroded in order to examine variations of eruption volumes through time. We will analyze bulk rock, glass and mineral compositions to assess whether or not they vary with ice presence/absence. Eruption ages for selected samples will be determined with high precision 40Ar/39Ar-dating to look for correlations between volcanism and CIS fluctuations as well as for comparison with the global ice volume record.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Steven Michael Lev (1992)

Paleoceanographic Reconstruction of Middle Ordovician Shales in Wales

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1991
Professor: Jeffrey Niemitz


Steven Michael Lev (1992)

Evolution of Individuality in Trepostome Bryozoans through the Paleozoic Era

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1990
Professor: Marcus Key


Alexander Saylor Lloyd (2007)

Edwards NSF Grant: Using the Products of Volcano Ice Interaction to Constrain Paleo-Ice Conditions

This project involves an integrated volcanological, sedimentological, geochemical and geochronological study of mafic and intermediate-silicic glaciovolcanic and glacial deposits from the Edziza Volcanic Complex (EVC), in northern British Columbia, Canada to both constrain variations in Pleistocene ice conditions in this region and to develop the methodology of using such a study as a proxy for paleo-ice conditions/paleoclimate elsewhere in the world. Constraining temporal variation in paleo-ice presence and thickness using a multi-disciplinary study of the products of a long-lived glaciovolcanic complex represents a significant new approach to using volcanic rocks as a proxy for paleoclimate. This project would develop a methodology based on integrating datasets from glaciovolcanic and glaciogenic facies analysis, volatile and H-isotope analysis of volcanic glass, and precise 40Ar/39Ar geochronology that could be used to constrain Pleistocene ice conditions in British Columbia, and in many other glaciated volcanic areas, such as the Cascades, the Andes, iceland, west Antarctica and Siberia. North-central British Columbia is a key area for understanding the dynamics of the Cordilleran ice Sheet (C1S), as models suggest that it lay close to the central and thickest part of the C1S during the Last Glacial Maximum and was located along a major ice divide. The processes and products of mafic glaciovolcanism are well documented, but those of intermediate-silicic glaciovolcanism are much less well known. This project would also significantly increase our understanding of this style of volcano-ice interaction. Studies of volcano-ice interaction on Earth help our understanding of deposits generated by magma-ice interaction on Mars, which are recognized as important astrobiological targets.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Alexander Saylor Lloyd (2007)

NSF 0439707 RUI: Using the Products of Volcano Ice Interaction to Constrain Paleo-Ice Conditions

This project involves an integrated volcanological, sedimentological, geochemical and geochronological study of mafic and intermediate-silicic glaciovolcanic and glacial deposits from the Edziza Volcanic Complex (EVC), in northern British Columbia, Canada to both constrain variations in Pleistocene ice conditions in this region and to develop the methodology of using such a study as a proxy for paleo-ice conditions/paleoclimate elsewhere in the world. Constraining temporal variation in paleo-ice presence and thickness using a multi-disciplinary study of the products of a long-lived glaciovolcanic complex represents a significant new approach to using volcanic rocks as a proxy for paleoclimate. This project would develop a methodology based on integrating datasets from glaciovolcanic and glaciogenic facies analysis, volatile and H-isotope analysis of volcanic glass, and precise 40Ar/39Ar geochronology that could be used to constrain Pleistocene ice conditions in British Columbia, and in many other glaciated volcanic areas, such as the Cascades, the Andes, iceland, west Antarctica and Siberia. North-central British Columbia is a key area for understanding the dynamics of the Cordilleran ice Sheet (C1S), as models suggest that it lay close to the central and thickest part of the C1S during the Last Glacial Maximum and was located along a major ice divide. The processes and products of mafic glaciovolcanism are well documented, but those of intermediate-silicic glaciovolcanism are much less well known. This project would also significantly increase our understanding of this style of volcano-ice interaction. Studies of volcano-ice interaction on Earth help our understanding of deposits generated by magma-ice interaction on Mars, which are recognized as important astrobiological targets.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Kristen Elizabeth Miller (2006)

Bryozoan Colony Growth Rates: a Proxy for Carbonate Production in Cool-Water Limestones

This summer we completed the preparation of Ordovician age fossil bryozoan samples which we collected last summer in Estonia. These results were presented by last year's student at the Geological Society of America meeting in March in Saratoga Springs, NY (Samson et al., 2005). Kristen also made more thin sections of these fossils. We also complete the preparation of the extant bryozoan samples from Croatia. The next step is to analyze the isotopic composition of the samples at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon, Canada the first week of October. Preliminary results were presented on 8 September at the Biology Center of the Upper Austria Landes Museum in Linz, Austria (Key et al., 2005). Kristen and I will also give a talk at the Department of Geological Sciences of the University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada on 30 September entitled "Using oxygen isotopes to determine ages of giant bryozoan colonies from the Adriatic Sea, Croatia".

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Marcus Key


Kristen Elizabeth Miller (2006)

Bryozoan Colony Growth Rates: A Proxy fo Carbonate Production in Cool-Water Limestones

Our goal is to quantify the growth rates of cool-water marine fossil bryozoan colonies in order to estimate the gross carbonate production rate of bryozoan colonies. The key to this project is the preservation of a seasonal water temperature signal in the oxygen isotopes of the fossilized bryozoan skeletons. Low Mg-calcite trepostome bryozoans were chosen due to their diagenetic stability. Mid paleolatitude carbonate paleoenvironments were chosen due to their strongly seasonal water temperatures. The best candidates for this study are the Ordovician trepostome bryozoan faunas of Ireland and Estonia.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Marcus Key


Matthew Dustin Moore (2004)

Bryozoan Colony Growth Rates: A Proxy fo Carbonate Production in Cool-Water Limestones

Our goal is to quantify the growth rates of cool-water marine fossil bryozoan colonies in order to estimate the gross carbonate production rate of bryozoan colonies. The key to this project is the preservation of a seasonal water temperature signal in the oxygen isotopes of the fossilized bryozoan skeletons. Low Mg-calcite trepostome bryozoans were chosen due to their diagenetic stability. Mid paleolatitude carbonate paleoenvironments were chosen due to their strongly seasonal water temperatures. The best candidates for this study are the Ordovician trepostome bryozoan faunas of Ireland and Estonia.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Marcus Key


Matthew Dustin Moore (2004)

Developing a new technique for determining the age of living and fossil bryozoan colonies

This study proposes to develop a technique for determining the ages of living and fossil bryozoan colonies. Bryozoans are a group of coral-like, aquatic, invertebrate animals that often form branching, tree-like colonies. The ages of the colonies will be determined using seasonal water temperature fluctuations recorded in the oxygen isotopic composition of their skeletons (i.e., it will be like counting geochemical tree rings). The significance of this project is that 1) it will determine if large bryozoan colonies can provide a long record of past climate changes; 2) it will enable us to determine the rate of carbonate production of these animals which is required to determine the rate of limestone formation from their skeletons; 3) it will allow us to determine the ages of colonies which can then be correlated with various traits such as colony size, shape, environment, etc.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Marcus Key


Matthew James Nogier (2006)

Testing hypothesis for the environment of eruption of the Pointer Ridge pyroclastic deposit, Hoodoo Mountain volcano, BC, Canada: volcanic explosions into the air or beneath ice?

We propose to investigate the eruption conditions that produced a 100 meter thick deposit of fragmental volcanic rocks at Pointer Ridge, on the north side of Hoodoo Mountain volcano, in western British Columbia, Canada. The goal of the study is to test two hypotheses about the origins of the pyroclastic rocks: i) that they formed during a dry, subaerial volcanic eruption or ii) that they formed during a wet, glaciovolcanic eruption. The proposed study will be significant for the training of two Dickinson undergraduates as well as for a broad scientific audience. The proposed research will provide intensive, quantitative training for the students and will be significant to a broader scientific audience concerned with volcanic hazards and global climate change.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Catherine Marie Powers (1999)

Growth Rates of Branching, Reef-forming Bryozoans

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Marcus Key


Jeffrey Bingham Roth (2001)

NSF 9616776 Collaborative Research: Ice-Core Analysis & Physical Glaciology of the Galena Creek Rock Glacier, Wyoming

1) Repeated, high-resolution surveys of the Galena Creek Rock Glacier over a five year period, resulting in the best motion survey of a rock glacier ever completed. The surveys allowed us to determine rates of ablation beneath the debris mantle over the whole rock glacier surface. Additionally, reconnaissance surveys and photo resurveys of Sulphur Creek Rock Glacier, a larger and possibly older feature near Galena Creek.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Noel Potter


Jeffrey Bingham Roth (2001)

Glaciological dynamics of Galena Creek rock glacier Wyoming.*

Galena Creek rock glacier (GCRG), a small, debris-covered glacier in the Absaroka Mountains, NW Wyoming. It has become the focus of a debate over the origin of ice in it since Potter first worked on it in the 1960's. In the past several years we have demonstrated clearly that ice in GCRG originates from compacted snow at its head like a clean glacier. A group of 4 collaborators and Potter are in the fourth year of a project supported by a 4-year NSF grant to study the flow and mass-balance of GCRG, and investigate its potential to yield information about past climate. The climate record is obtained by study of oxygen isotopes and deuterium in the annual layers preserved in the ice. In Summer, 2000 we hope to: 1) drill a long core from the ice, 2)re-survey some 300 marks in 1997 and 1999 to obtain another year of detailed movement for GCRG, and continue to measure and map the thickness of debris over the rock glacier. We also wish to return to nearby Sulphur Creek rock glacier (SCRG) to re-survey marks emplaced in 1997 and repeated in 1999. This proposal requests funds for travel not included in the 4th year of the NSF grant, plus supplementary funds so that Jeff Roth, a Junior geology major can work with me for 5 weeks this Summer in August and accompany me to Wyoming. Roth will be in charge of the project to continue to measure debris thickness begun by another student in 1999, but will participate in all aspects of our work on GCRG and SCRG.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Noel Potter


Timothy M Samson (2005)

Bryozoan Colony Growth Rates: A Proxy fo Carbonate Production in Cool-Water Limestones

Our goal is to quantify the growth rates of cool-water marine fossil bryozoan colonies in order to estimate the gross carbonate production rate of bryozoan colonies. The key to this project is the preservation of a seasonal water temperature signal in the oxygen isotopes of the fossilized bryozoan skeletons. Low Mg-calcite trepostome bryozoans were chosen due to their diagenetic stability. Mid paleolatitude carbonate paleoenvironments were chosen due to their strongly seasonal water temperatures. The best candidates for this study are the Ordovician trepostome bryozoan faunas of Ireland and Estonia.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Marcus Key


Timothy M Samson (2005)

Bryozoan Colony Growth Rates: A Proxy fo Carbonate Production in Cool-Water Limestones

Our goal is to quantify the growth rates of cool-water marine fossil bryozoan colonies in order to estimate the gross carbonate production rate of bryozoan colonies. The key to this project is the preservation of a seasonal water temperature signal in the oxygen isotopes of the fossilized bryozoan skeletons. Low Mg-calcite trepostome bryozoans were chosen due to their diagenetic stability. Mid paleolatitude carbonate paleoenvironments were chosen due to their strongly seasonal water temperatures. The best candidates for this study are the Ordovician trepostome bryozoan faunas of Ireland and Estonia.

Term Funded:Fall 2004
Professor: Marcus Key


Timothy M Samson (2005)

Bryozoan colony growth rates: a proxy for carbonate production in cool-water limestones

As part of my 3 year $50,000 grant from the American Chemical Society's Petroleum Research Fund, I need to hire a student to work with me on a research project. The project is explained in detail in the attached copy of the original grant proposal. The grant pays the summer salaries and field expenses for me and my student. From R&D I am simply requesting summer room and board for the student to live on campus after we return from our field work. The student (Timothy Samson) will travel to Tallin, Estonia with me this summer. We will meet up with colleagues from Ireland and Germany to collect 450 million year old fossils. We will then return to Carlisle to prepare the specimens for isotopic analysis in Canada this fall. Tim will continue the project next year for his senior research. In Estonia, Tim will learn paleontological field techniques in an international collaborative team setting. Back in Carlisle, he will learn thin sectioning and image analysis techniques.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Marcus Key


Adam Paul Tagliamonte (1999)

A Comparative Study of Karst Hydrology and Hydrogeology in Cambro-Ordovician carbonates of South-Central Pennsylvania, and Recent Carbonates on San Salvador Island, Bahamas Implications for Future Water Resource Supply and Management

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Jeffrey Niemitz


Norma Luke Tedford (1994)

Petrogenesis of Martinsburg Graywacke, and Bentinite

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Henry Hanson


Michael Edward Tomlin (2001)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Gene Yogodzinski


Jennifer Elaine Van Pelt (1989)

Fluvial Geomorphology and Chronostratigraphy of the Mary Wild Beck, Northern Yorkshire

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1988
Professor: Jeffrey Niemitz


Kathryn Allyson Wetherell (2005)

Comparison of field and mineralogical characteristics of trachytic volcanism in the nothern Cordilleran volcanic province, British Columbia, Canada

This application proposes to conduct a comparative study of trachytic rocks from six volcanic areas in the northern Cordilleran volcanic province, northwestern British Columbia, Canada. The goals of the study are to test hypotheses about the origins of the volcanic rocks and the details of their eruptions. The six areas include three that have been studied previously and three that have not. The three least studied areas will be mapped and described in the field, and all six locations will be analyzed for spatial and volumetric information using ArcView 3.2 Geographic Information System (GIS) software. Samples from all locations will also be studied in the Geology Department at Dickinson College using a Scanning Electron Microscope to identify and characterize the minerals in the samples. The study of volvanic rocks from the six locations is significant because: i) their presence implies the possibility of future explosive eruptions with attendant threats to northern latitude air traffic; ii) locally they erupted beneath or against ice and so can be used to constrain long-term climatic history inferred from the distribution and thickness of local and regional glaciers; and iii) they have unique chemical compositions for which previous researchers have proposed multiple hypotheses of origin. The GIS database produced by this project will be the foundation for future research into interactions between volcanoes and plate tectonics, volcanic hazard studies, and long-term climate in northwestern North America.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Kathryn Allyson Wetherell (2005)

Testing hypothesis for the environment of eruption of the Pointer Ridge pyroclastic deposit, Hoodoo Mountain volcano, BC, Canada: volcanic explosions into the air or beneath ice?

We propose to investigate the eruption conditions that produced a 100 meter thick deposit of fragmental volcanic rocks at Pointer Ridge, on the north side of Hoodoo Mountain volcano, in western British Columbia, Canada. The goal of the study is to test two hypotheses about the origins of the pyroclastic rocks: i) that they formed during a dry, subaerial volcanic eruption or ii) that they formed during a wet, glaciovolcanic eruption. The proposed study will be significant for the training of two Dickinson undergraduates as well as for a broad scientific audience. The proposed research will provide intensive, quantitative training for the students and will be significant to a broader scientific audience concerned with volcanic hazards and global climate change.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Benjamin Edwards


Marci Allison Wills (2010)

Constraints on Regional-scale Deformation across the Pennsylvania Salient as Deduced from Geologic Cross-Sections.

Although the sweeping arc of the Pennsylvania salient of the Appalachians is among the most widely cited examples of orogenic curvature, some aspects of its evolution remain enigmatic despite nearly 150 years of research (i.e., Rogers, 1858; Dana, 1866; Gwinn, 1967; Rodgers, 1970; Gray and Stamatakos, 1997; Marshak, 2004; Wise, 2004; Wise and Werner, 2004). Herein we propose a field-based investigation across the Valley and Ridge physiographic province along the Susquehanna River Valley. Here the southward flowing Susquehanna River is oriented at a high angle to the northeast trending Appalachians Mountains. Folded and faulted Paleozoic rocks are exposed in the riverbed, road cuts along both the east and west banks of the river, in quarries, and throughout the agricultural and forested lands of the greater Susquehanna River Valley. By constructing a detailed geologic swath map along the shores of the river we hope to constrain the amount of tectonic shortening between Harrisburg and Williamsport, PA. This long-term study involves detailed geologic mapping of a roughly 3 to 5 km wide swath centered about the Susquehanna River, extending from Harrisburg to Williamsport. Ultimately results of this mapping effort will be used to construct a balanced geologic cross-section. The cross-section will be palinspastically restored, placing constraints on the total amount of shortening across the ~ 100 km wide swath of the Valley and Ridge physiographic province. This study will also provide insight into the subsurface structure and the sequence of faulting across the Pennsylvania salient. This knowledge can help to delineate the boundaries of possible target areas for carbon sequestration in central Pennsylvania.Mapping during the summer of 2006 by Sak and Dickinson College undergraduate Margaret Jackson revealed a northeast trending zone of high strain. This localized region of high strain extends northeastward from the west shore of the Susquehanna River in the vicinity of Duncannon, PA, across the Juniata and Susquehanna Rivers, and north of Halifax, PA. The position of this zone of high strain is interpreted to reflect the position of a thrust fault within the underlying duplex thrust system (i.e., Herman, 1984). We are in the process of analyzing the distribution of distorted crinoid columnals from six exposures of the Devonian Trimmers Rock Formation using the Fry method (Fry, 1979) to quantify strain across a first-order anticline just north of the localized zone of high strain. The summer 2006 field season yielded in excess of 170 new structural data points. Current mapping is proceeding through the Reward and Millersburg quadrangles. In the summer of 2007 we added in excess of 80 new structural data points to the map and seven strain ellipses for finite strain measured in Perry, Northumberland, and Juniata Counties.Scope of Work The study area for this proposal is a roughly 3 to 5 km wide swath centered on the Susquehanna River from the Juniata-Snyder county line northward to Williamsport. Lithologic and structural data will be collected using standard outcrop techniques. Data will be entered into an Access database provided by the Pennsylvania Geological Survey. Oriented rock samples will be collected from selected outcrops. Thin sections prepared from these samples will be analyzed to quantify strain in local regions throughout the study area. Results of the proposed investigation will be combined with data from the previous two years of study to construct a preliminary cross-section extending roughly between Harrisburg and Williamsport.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Peter Sak


Maria Ejzak Zarod (1999)

Origin and Implications of Mantle Xenoliths at Sheveluch Volcano, Kamchatka

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Gene Yogodzinski


John Gregory Zbell (1998)

NSF 9419240 Regional Variability in Aleutian Primitive Magmas and Implications for Processes in the Mantle Wedge: Proposal for an Ion Probe Study

n/a

Term Funded:Year 1997
Professor: Gene Yogodzinski


Jack Aaron Zimmerman (1997)

Variations in Lake Water Chemistry of a Triassic (early Mesozoic) Rift Lake; Warford member Lockatong formation, Newark Supergroup of eastern North America

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: Jeffrey Niemitz


Daniel Paul dePeyer (2002)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Fall 1999
Professor: Jeffrey Niemitz


German

Jennifer Susan Pavelko (2000)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Year 2000
Professor: Scott Muller


History

Meghan Eleanor Allen (2008)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

We began the House Divided project on our own in summer 2004. We are hoping to build the premier web portal for students and teachers interested in the coming of the American Civil War. In this endeavor, we aim to create a digital archive of various primary sources, including newspaper articles, letters, diaries, recollections and images. We were interested in this period because Dickinson College was at the center of the story. It was quite literally a "house divided" between northern and southern students and its alumni were some of the most important figures in the sectional crisis. (also please see attached memo)

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Russell Joseph Allen (2014)

Civil War & Reconstruction MOOC

This student faculty team will be developing a massive online open course (MOOC) on "Civil War & Reconstruction" for summer 2013. This course is already in development in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and after a pilot experience that we offered in summer 2012 (http://blogs.dickinson.edu/hist-gilder). The student will assist in the refining and testing the course materials and assessment tools. He or she would also help manage the course during its launch in July 2013. And the student collaborator will provide significant research and assistance toward the creation of a pedagogical article or articles that would ask whether open online education has a place in a liberal arts environment such as Dickinson College, and if so, how should it be constructed.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Anabella Giselle Atach (2008)

Patagonia Mosaic Virtual Museum and Resource Center

Since 2001, faculty-student research teams have participated in the three editions of the Patagonia Mosaic project. In collaboration with faculty from the National University of Patagonia and the community of Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina, this interdisciplinary project focuses on a cross-cultural analysis of immigration, labor, community life, and memory through fieldwork and historical research. Results of the Patagonia Mosaic initiative are available in the mosaic's Virtual Museum and Resource Center which has also been created in collaboration between faculty and students. The Museum contains multimedia exhibits around central themes in the history of the community of Comodoro Rivadavia and its company towns: migratory experiences, gender and work, community life, family life, and public memory. In addition, the Resource Center contains a searchable collection of historical photographs and documents. The Dana Research assistants will work on editing and updating the museum exhibits and the collection of historical photographs and documents. Since 2001, faculty-student research teams have participated in the three editions of the Patagonia Mosaic project. In collaboration with faculty from the National University of Patagonia and the community of Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina, this interdisciplinary project focuses on a cross-cultural analysis of immigration, labor, community life, and memory through fieldwork and historical research. Results of the Patagonia Mosaic initiative are available in the mosaic's Virtual Museum and Resource Center which has also been created in collaboration between faculty and students. The Museum contains multimedia exhibits around central themes in the history of the community of Comodoro Rivadavia and its company towns: migratory experiences, gender and work, community life, family life, and public memory. In addition

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: Marcelo Borges


Mofeyisayo Ayomidun Ayodele (2009)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

We are in the process of launching the House Divided website at various teacher training workshops beginning in March and July 2007. The website aspires to offer teachers, students and the general public greater understanding of the coming of the Civil War by using the documents and stories of Dickinson College as a window into the turbulent era. We have been using four student interns each summer and academic year and need to continue at this level for the foreseeable future. However, we can reimburse R&D for one of these students using funds from our NEH grants and general project budget. Still, we prefer to use the Dana umbrella to recruit and designate all of the interns in order to keep everything as simple as possible. All the interns do similar work -editing, transcribing and digitizing historical documents and assisting with the preparations for the teacher workshops (which serve as our primary means of advertising the website).

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Jim Gerencser


Michael William Blake (2009)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

We are in the process of launching the House Divided website at various teacher training workshops beginning in March and July 2007. The website aspires to offer teachers, students and the general public greater understanding of the coming of the Civil War by using the documents and stories of Dickinson College as a window into the turbulent era. We have been using four student interns each summer and academic year and need to continue at this level for the foreseeable future. However, we can reimburse R&D for one of these students using funds from our NEH grants and general project budget. Still, we prefer to use the Dana umbrella to recruit and designate all of the interns in order to keep everything as simple as possible. All the interns do similar work -editing, transcribing and digitizing historical documents and assisting with the preparations for the teacher workshops (which serve as our primary means of advertising the website).

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: John Osborne


Krislin Marie Bolling (1995)

Editing: Supplement to the Modern Encyclopedia of Russian, Soviet and Eurasian History.

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1994
Professor: George Rhyne


Christine Bombaro (1993)

Editing: Supplement to the Modern Encyclopedia of Russian, Soviet and Eurasian History.

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: George Rhyne


Trey Terrell Boone (2011)

House Divided Project

We would like to continue to receive three (3) Dana interns for the House Divided Project for 2008-09. We have launched a draft or beta version of the main website at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu and have developed and launched several related sites, including a blog at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu; a digital classroom on the Underground Railroad at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/ugrr; an innovative virtual field trip site that uses historical map overlays on Google Earth at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/fieldtrips as well as many more, both online and currently in development. Over the last three years, our Dana interns have been essential to the development of the project and will continue to be so in 2008-09. Our interns conduct research, help transcribe and annotate historical documents and assist with data entry and a wide variety of technical tasks. We are in urgent need of additional help as we prepare for the completion of our project on the eve of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War in spring 2011.

Term Funded:Year 2009
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Brendan M Boston (2011)

House Divided Project

For the last few years, the House Divided Project has been engaged in building an innovative web-based archive on the coming of the Civil War and in sponsoring various K-12 teacher training workshops on Civil War Era topics. This summer promises to be one of our most important to date. We will unveil our developing website to Dickinson College alumni on June 13, 2007 and we will host our 3d NEH Landmarks of the Underground Railroad workshop for nearly 100 K-12 teachers from across the country. We have been using four student interns each summer and need to continue at this level for the foreseeable future. All the interns do similar work -editing, transcribing and digitizing historical documents and assisting with the preparations for the teacher workshops (which serve as our primary means of advertising the website). As we have done in the past, we will be able to reimburse R&D for one or perhaps two of these interns.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: John Osborne


James Raphael Chapnick (2010)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

We began the House Divided project on our own in summer 2004 and since summer 2005 we have received significant support from the R&D Committee. We have been hoping to build the premier web portal for students and teachers interested in the coming of the American Civil War. We currently have more than 1,500 historic documents and 1,000 images ready for web-based presentation. In 2007, we launched a web-based resource center on the Underground Railroad and sometime this year we hope to launch the full website covering the period 1846-1863. We have also been deeply engaged in various K-12 teacher-training initiatives. In summer 2006 and summer 2007 we hosted a total of 200 teachers from over 40 different states in workshops on the Underground Railroad sponsored by the NEH. We also hosted more than 65 educators in spring 2007 on the 150th anniversary of the Dred Scott Case -an event co-sponsored by the National Constitution Center.

Term Funded:Year 2008
Professor: Jim Gerencser


John Blake Dickinson (2008)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

We began the House Divided project on our own in summer 2004 and since summer 2005 we have received significant support from the R&D Committee. We have been hoping to build the premier web portal for students and teachers interested in the coming of the American Civil War. We currently have more than 1,500 historic documents and 1,000 images ready for web-based presentation. In 2007, we launched a web-based resource center on the Underground Railroad and sometime this year we hope to launch the full website covering the period 1846-1863. We have also been deeply engaged in various K-12 teacher-training initiatives. In summer 2006 and summer 2007 we hosted a total of 200 teachers from over 40 different states in workshops on the Underground Railroad sponsored by the NEH. We also hosted more than 65 educators in spring 2007 on the 150th anniversary of the Dred Scott Case -an event co-sponsored by the National Constitution Center.

Term Funded:Year 2008
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Andrea Dominguez (2010)

Exiled Spanish Youth in the USSR, 1937-51

This proposal is for support of a new book project investigating the life and education of children exiled from Spain to the Soviet Union during the Spanish Civil War. I am requesting two students, fluent in Spanish and Russian, to broaden and annotate a Spanish-language bibliography and to create a database of Spanish children and teachers from Russian-language archival material I collected during my last trip to Moscow. The only Russian scholar to research this topic has failed to ask anything about the children's education and upbringing. Spanish scholars have conducted some oral histories on the topic, but none have used the archive of the Spanish orphanages in Moscow. Because so many of these children went on to prominent careers, including about 200 who aided Castro in his revolution, scholars need to know more about how their formative years in the Soviet system.

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: Karl Qualls


Matthew J Dudek (2006)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

In summer 2004, we began working with experts at LIS to develop a web-based research project that aspired to become a premier web portal for students and teachers interested in the coming of the American Civil War. We plan to call the website "House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862." Using the college community as a starting point and the period from 1846-1862 as a dramatic frame, the website will detail in day-by-day format how the crisis evolved and why fellow citizens from that era came to see each other as mortal enemies. The House Divided website will feature some of the college's unique archival resources - student diaries, letters, and recollections as well as a broad selection of the nation's daily newspapers and other relevant primary sources.

Term Funded:Year 2006
Professor: John Osborne


Laura Christine Edgar (2002)

Comparative Urban Biographies: The Naval Cities of Sevastopol and Annapolis

It is my contention that many, if not all, major cities have their own biography which has organically developed over time, but also has been created by urban planners, historians, politicians, and local residents. This story is often told through erecting monuments and memorials to people or events that were important in the city's history, but more subtle forms also appear in the names of streets and parks and the style and placement of buildings. The most overt form of "writing" urban biographies occurs in guidebooks and travel literature. Whether subtle or overt, the intent is the same: to transmit a particular history or image to visitors and residents alike. Why and how this process occurs varies and this is why I propose with my student collaborators, and investigation of Annapolis's urban biography and compare it to my city of research--Sevastopol, Ukraine.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Karl Qualls


Andrew B Ferguson (2006)

To experient with the idea that professors and students at the Consortium schools like Dickinson might be able to offer nonpartisan, often historically minded, policy research to requests from the Pennsylvania Governor's office

The Congressional Research Service (CRS) provides nonpartisan, often historically minded, policy research at the request of Members of Congress. CRS reports have earned a reputation for being thorough, objective, and quite helpful to policy makers. I propose to use a Dana Research Assistantship to experiment with the idea that professors and students at the Consortium schools like Dickinson might be able to offer something similar to policy makers in Harrisburg. Donna Cooper, the Policy Director in the Governor's Office, has expressed an interest in participating in such a joint project with professors and students. To help launch this effort, I propose working with a Dana Research Assistant to respond to various requests from the Governor's office during the course of several weeks in the fall and spring semester. Given my area of expertise (American political history), the nature of the assignments will primarily concern policy histor and the product will be a series of detailed 15-20 page memos.

Term Funded:Year 2005
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


David William Gillespie (2011)

House Divided Project

The House Divided Project is an innovative and wide-ranging effort designed to create various resources for classroom teachers and students who are studying the Civil War era. Our special focus involves building digital resources that use Dickinson College as a window for understanding the period. The R&D Committee has provided extensive support for this project since our inception in summer 2005. We have now launched several websites (gateway site: http://housedivided.dickinson.edu) and have trained over 1,000 K-12 teachers from more than 45 states. Our website has been featured by C-SPAN and our various projects have been supported by the NEH and Motorola. However, we continue to need extra resources in the preparation for a full-fledged national public launch and content completion which is targeted for April 2011, the date that marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Our most critical need is for student labor and assistance and the Dana program has been indispensable for our growth. So, we are once again requesting three (3) Dana assistants for summer 2009.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Shannon Sharee Givens (2011)

XIX Century Discourses on the Nature of Ethiopians.

This project represents an expansion of my dissertation, in which I look at the encounter between Ethiopians and Europeans from their first interaction in the early-modern era to the late 18th century: my dissertation's main argument is that until the early 17th century Ethiopians were perceived and lived in Europe as peers by virtue of their religious identity and that their European interlocutors regarded skin color as inconsequential. Starting in the 17th century color prejudice started to affect the European understanding of Ethiopians, a process that culminated in the 19th century when European scientists and proto-ethnographers started to refer to Ethiopians as "Hamitic" as opposed to "Negroes", and eventually as "Black Caucasians". With the help of a research assistant I would be able to find, retrieve and index 19th century works concerned with the nature of Ethiopians and propose a genealogy of the different ideas that emerged about them.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: Matteo Salvadore


Elitsa Plamenova Gosheva (2010)

Patagonia Mosaic Virtual Museum and Resource Center

Since 2001, faculty-student research teams have participated in the three editions of the Patagonia Mosaic project. In collaboration with faculty from the National University of Patagonia and the community of Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina, this interdisciplinary project focuses on a cross-cultural analysis of immigration, labor, community life, and memory through fieldwork and historical research. Results of the Patagonia Mosaic initiative are available in the mosaic's Virtual Museum and Resource Center which has also been created in collaboration between faculty and students. The Museum contains multimedia exhibits around central themes in the history of the community of Comodoro Rivadavia and its company towns: migratory experiences, gender and work, community life, family life, and public memory. In addition, the Resource Center contains a searchable collection of historical photographs and documents. The Dana Research assistants will work on editing and updating the museum exhibits and the collection of historical photographs and documents. Since 2001, faculty-student research teams have participated in the three editions of the Patagonia Mosaic project. In collaboration with faculty from the National University of Patagonia and the community of Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina, this interdisciplinary project focuses on a cross-cultural analysis of immigration, labor, community life, and memory through fieldwork and historical research. Results of the Patagonia Mosaic initiative are available in the mosaic's Virtual Museum and Resource Center which has also been created in collaboration between faculty and students. The Museum contains multimedia exhibits around central themes in the history of the community of Comodoro Rivadavia and its company towns: migratory experiences, gender and work, community life, family life, and public memory. In addition

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: Marcelo Borges


Meghan Ann Hakanson (2006)

NEH Landmarks National Teacher Education Project at Plimoth Plantation

The Landmark Teacher Training Program at Plimoth Plantation will bring 150 primary and secondary teachers from across America together with the leading college and university scholars in Colonial/Atlantic world history. In three week-long seminars (50 teachers per week) our students, the teachers, academics, and plantation staff will conduct an intensive investigation into the new scholarship of the colonial period of settlement in New England and America. Among the themes around which the conference is being organized are: The Worlds of the Wampanoags and the Pilgrims; Encounters and Adjustments; Conversion or Conquest - the Choices Posed and Choices Made; the Aftermath of a Troubled Century. Teachers, Scholars, and Museum professionals will interact and enrich each other's perspectives on the past throughout the conference. As production coordinators, our students will be integral to every aspect of this conference series, and will have extensive contact with today's leading scholars of colonial American and Atlantic world history.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Shane Mitchell Harding (2012)

House Divided Project

The House Divided Project aspires to become one of the nation's premier resources for teaching and learning during the Civil War anniversary (2011-2015). The project has launched a digital research engine for the American Civil War era at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu that uses Dickinson College as a window and an array of innovative software applications to create a unique and engaging learning environment for the broad period, 1840 to 1880. We have also created digital classrooms on popular topics such as the Underground Railroad (http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/ugrr) and the Lincoln-Douglas Debates (http://housedivided.dickinson.edu) that provide special resources for K-12 educators. As part of this outreach, we have also maintained a blog (http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/blog) that focuses on introducing teachers to the latest resources on the period. This outreach has also been enhanced during the last five years with a series of well-attended teacher training workshop. We have hosted nearly 500 educators from more than 45 states here at the Dickinson College campus over the last five years.

Term Funded:Year 2010
Professor: Matt Pinsker


Shane Mitchell Harding (2012)

House Divided Project

The House Divided Project aspires to become one of the nation's premier resources for teaching and learning during the Civil War anniversary (2011-2015). The project has launched a digital research engine for the American Civil War era at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu that uses Dickinson College as a window and an array of innovative software applications to create a unique and engaging learning environment for the broad period, 1840 to 1880. We have also created digital classrooms on popular topics such as the Underground Railroad (http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/ugrr) and the Lincoln-Douglas Debates (http://housedivided.dickinson.edu) that provide special resources for K-12 educators. As part of this outreach, we have also maintained a blog (http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/blog) that focuses on introducing teachers to the latest resources on the period. This outreach has also been enhanced during the last five years with a series of well-attended teacher training workshop. We have hosted nearly 500 educators from more than 45 states here at the Dickinson College campus over the last five years.

Term Funded:Year 2009
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Cassandra Lorraine Harter (2007)

NEH Landmarks National Teacher Education Project at Plimoth Plantation

The Landmark Teacher Training Program at Plimoth Plantation will bring 150 primary and secondary teachers from across America together with the leading college and university scholars in Colonial/Atlantic world history. In three week-long seminars (50 teachers per week) our students, the teachers, academics, and plantation staff will conduct an intensive investigation into the new scholarship of the colonial period of settlement in New England and America. Among the themes around which the conference is being organized are: The Worlds of the Wampanoags and the Pilgrims; Encounters and Adjustments; Conversion or Conquest - the Choices Posed and Choices Made; the Aftermath of a Troubled Century. Teachers, Scholars, and Museum professionals will interact and enrich each other's perspectives on the past throughout the conference. As production coordinators, our students will be integral to every aspect of this conference series, and will have extensive contact with today's leading scholars of colonial American and Atlantic world history.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Walter Woodward


Regan Winn Kaiden (2002)

Comparative Urban Biographies: The Naval Cities of Sevastopol and Annapolis

It is my contention that many, if not all, major cities have their own biography which has organically developed over time, but also has been created by urban planners, historians, politicians, and local residents. This story is often told through erecting monuments and memorials to people or events that were important in the city's history, but more subtle forms also appear in the names of streets and parks and the style and placement of buildings. The most overt form of "writing" urban biographies occurs in guidebooks and travel literature. Whether subtle or overt, the intent is the same: to transmit a particular history or image to visitors and residents alike. Why and how this process occurs varies and this is why I propose with my student collaborators, and investigation of Annapolis's urban biography and compare it to my city of research--Sevastopol, Ukraine.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Karl Qualls


Caitlin Elizabeth Kingsley (2009)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

We began the House Divided project on our own in summer 2004 and since summer 2005 we have received significant support from the R&D Committee. As you know, we are hoping to build the premier web portal for students and teachers interested in the coming of the American Civil War. In this endeavor, we aim to create a digital archive of various primary sources, including newspaper articles, letters, diaries, recollections and images. We were interested in this period because Dickinson College was at the center of the story. It was quite literally a "house divided" between northern and southern students and its alumni were some of the most important figures in the sectional crisis. Now, we are heading into the final run-up to our public launch, curretly set for March 2007 (on the 150th anniversary of the Dred Scott decision). We hope to use three Dana interns during the academic year to prepare for this public presentation.

Term Funded:Year 2007
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Timothy Kuppler (2007)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

The Congressional Research Service (CRS) provides nonpartisan, often historically minded, policy research at the request of Members of Congress. CRS reports have earned a reputation for being thorough, objective, and quite helpful to policy makers. I propose to use a Dana Research Assistantship to experiment with the idea that professors and students at the Consortium schools like Dickinson might be able to offer something similar to policy makers in Harrisburg. Donna Cooper, the Policy Director in the Governor's Office, has expressed an interest in participating in such a joint project with professors and students. To help launch this effort, I propose working with a Dana Research Assistant to respond to various requests from the Governor's office during the course of several weeks in the fall and spring semester. Given my area of expertise (American political history), the nature of the assignments will primarily concern policy history and the product will be a series of detailed 15-20 page memos.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Anna Lovett (2010)

House Divided Project

For the last few years, the House Divided Project has been engaged in building an innovative web-based archive on the coming of the Civil War and in sponsoring various K-12 teacher training workshops on Civil War Era topics. This summer promises to be one of our most important to date. We will unveil our developing website to Dickinson College alumni on June 13, 2007 and we will host our 3d NEH Landmarks of the Underground Railroad workshop for nearly 100 K-12 teachers from across the country. We have been using four student interns each summer and need to continue at this level for the foreseeable future. All the interns do similar work -editing, transcribing and digitizing historical documents and assisting with the preparations for the teacher workshops (which serve as our primary means of advertising the website). As we have done in the past, we will be able to reimburse R&D for one or perhaps two of these interns.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Benjamin Jacob Lyman (2011)

House Divided Project

We would like to continue to receive three (3) Dana interns for the House Divided Project for 2008-09. We have launched a draft or beta version of the main website at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu and have developed and launched several related sites, including a blog at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu; a digital classroom on the Underground Railroad at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/ugrr; an innovative virtual field trip site that uses historical map overlays on Google Earth at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/fieldtrips as well as many more, both online and currently in development. Over the last three years, our Dana interns have been essential to the development of the project and will continue to be so in 2008-09. Our interns conduct research, help transcribe and annotate historical documents and assist with data entry and a wide variety of technical tasks. We are in urgent need of additional help as we prepare for the completion of our project on the eve of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War in spring 2011.

Term Funded:Year 2009
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Daniel Joseph Makosky (2006)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

In summer 2004, we began working with experts at LIS to develop a web-based research project that aspired to become a premier web portal for students and teachers interested in the coming of the American Civil War. We plan to call the website "House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862." Using the college community as a starting point and the period from 1846-1862 as a dramatic frame, the website will detail in day-by-day format how the crisis evolved and why fellow citizens from that era came to see each other as mortal enemies. The House Divided website will feature some of the college's unique archival resources - student diaries, letters, and recollections as well as a broad selection of the nation's daily newspapers and other relevant primary sources.

Term Funded:Year 2006
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


John Wesley McCoy (2007)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

We began the House Divided project on our own in summer 2004. We are hoping to build the premier web portal for students and teachers interested in the coming of the American Civil War. In this endeavor, we aim to create a digital archive of various primary sources, including newspaper articles, letters, diaries, recollections and images. We were interested in this period because Dickinson College was at the center of the story. It was quite literally a "house divided" between northern and southern students and its alumni were some of the most important figures in the sectional crisis. (also please see attached memo)

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Brenna Mary McKelvey (2012)

House Divided Project

The House Divided Project has benefited from over two dozen interns (Dana and otherwise) over the last several years. They have proven indispensable to our progress which can now be measured in dozens of websites, thousands of K-12 teacher users, and tens of thousands of records, images, documents and other digital resources. During the previous year alone, we produced partnership websites with the Journal of American History, National Civil War Museum and Pennsyvlania Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission that feature the by-lined work of Dana research interns. In 2010, we are preparing for the public launch of our main database or research engine on the Civil War era in time of the 150th anniversary of the conflict, which begins in April 2011. We need our Dana help more than ever and this summer, in particular, we would like to apply for three interns --two for our usual work of digital history and one specialist in GIS to work with our project and Jim Ciarrocca on developing more GIS-enhanced maps for the era.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: John Osborne


Azul Sofia Mertnoff (2010)

Las Casas de los Ninos

This proposal is for support of a new book project investigating the life and education of children exiled from Spain to the Soviet Union during the Spanish Civil War. I am requesting a student, fluent in Spanish to provide translation assistance of oral histories and some memoirs. The only Russian scholar to research this topic has failed to ask anything about the children's education and upbringing. Spanish scholars have conducted some oral histories on the topic, but none have used the archive of the Spanish orphanages in Moscow. Because so many of these children went on to prominent careers, including about 200 who aided Castro in his revolution, scholars need to know more about how their formative years in the Soviet system. My study will open a window not only on the important childhood years of these children, but also help us to understand the lengths to which the USSR went in order to spread revolution beyond its borders. By juxtaposing the official Russian-language narrative with the memories in the Spanish-language sources, I hope to be able to make some conclusions about questions of both memory and propaganda.

Term Funded:Year 2009
Professor: Karl Qualls


Leah Rae Miller (2014)

Civil War & Reconstruction MOOC

This student faculty team will be developing a massive online open course (MOOC) on "Civil War & Reconstruction" for summer 2013. This course is already in development in partnership with the Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History and after a pilot experience that we offered in summer 2012 (http://blogs.dickinson.edu/hist-gilder). The student will assist in the refining and testing the course materials and assessment tools. He or she would also help manage the course during its launch in July 2013. And the student collaborator will provide significant research and assistance toward the creation of a pedagogical article or articles that would ask whether open online education has a place in a liberal arts environment such as Dickinson College, and if so, how should it be constructed.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Morgan Rhea Mintz (2010)

House Divided Project

The House Divided Project aspires to become one of the nation's premier resources for teaching and learning during the Civil War anniversary (2011-2015). The project has launched a digital research engine for the American Civil War era at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu that uses Dickinson College as a window and an array of innovative software applications to create a unique and engaging learning environment for the broad period, 1840 to 1880. We have also created digital classrooms on popular topics such as the Underground Railroad (http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/ugrr) and the Lincoln-Douglas Debates (http://housedivided.dickinson.edu) that provide special resources for K-12 educators. As part of this outreach, we have also maintained a blog (http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/blog) that focuses on introducing teachers to the latest resources on the period. This outreach has also been enhanced during the last five years with a series of well-attended teacher training workshop. We have hosted nearly 500 educators from more than 45 states here at the Dickinson College campus over the last five years.

Term Funded:Year 2009
Professor: John Osborne


Morgan Rhea Mintz (2010)

House Divided Project

The House Divided Project aspires to become one of the nation's premier resources for teaching and learning during the Civil War anniversary (2011-2015). The project has launched a digital research engine for the American Civil War era at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu that uses Dickinson College as a window and an array of innovative software applications to create a unique and engaging learning environment for the broad period, 1840 to 1880. We have also created digital classrooms on popular topics such as the Underground Railroad (http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/ugrr) and the Lincoln-Douglas Debates (http://housedivided.dickinson.edu) that provide special resources for K-12 educators. As part of this outreach, we have also maintained a blog (http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/blog) that focuses on introducing teachers to the latest resources on the period. This outreach has also been enhanced during the last five years with a series of well-attended teacher training workshop. We have hosted nearly 500 educators from more than 45 states here at the Dickinson College campus over the last five years.

Term Funded:Year 2010
Professor: John Osborne


Caitlin Elizabeth Moriarty (2013)

Gagarin: The Life History of a Russian Émigré

Historians know relatively little about the Russian émigré experience in the United States. Why did they come? How did they transition and adapt to foreign country, language, and culture? How did the community maintain itself and perpetuate its native culture? These are just some of the questions we would like to answer through the interview of Mr. Gregory Gagarin, a prominent member of the Russian immigrant community in Washington, D.C.. As a board member of the Russian Cultural Center and the Firebird Arts Foundation, both in Washington, D.C., Mr. Gagarin has many useful contacts within the Russian-American community. His connections within the community will, we anticipate, allow us to expand the scope of the study in the coming years from one person's life story to a complex history of and virtual web archive about the Russian émigré experience in the United States. This would allow for more student-faculty research and publication opportunities and potentially a mosaic program in a location like Brighton Beach, NY, one of the largest and most concentrated Russian communities in the US.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Karl Qualls


Leigh Ann Oczkowski (2012)

House Divided Project

With the impending 150th anniversary of the Civil War fast approaching (2011-15), the Cumberland Valley needs to explore new ways to highlight for visitors its extraordinary significance in that defining conflict. The House Divided Project at Dickinson College and the Cumberland County Historical Society plan to work together to build a dynamic website featuring dramatic stories from the era that will enhance a series of walking and driving tours developed around Civil War era themes. These combined resources will together enable a wide variety of visitors (teachers & students, families, heritage tour groups, etc.) to consider extending their stay in the Cumberland Valley and to better appreciate the role of the region in both the coming of the war and during the conflict itself.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Matt Pinsker


David William Park (2010)

House Divided Project

The House Divided Project is an innovative and wide-ranging effort designed to create various resources for classroom teachers and students who are studying the Civil War era. Our special focus involves building digital resources that use Dickinson College as a window for understanding the period. The R&D Committee has provided extensive support for this project since our inception in summer 2005. We have now launched several websites (gateway site: http://housedivided.dickinson.edu) and have trained over 1,000 K-12 teachers from more than 45 states. Our website has been featured by C-SPAN and our various projects have been supported by the NEH and Motorola. However, we continue to need extra resources in the preparation for a full-fledged national public launch and content completion which is targeted for April 2011, the date that marks the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Our most critical need is for student labor and assistance and the Dana program has been indispensable for our growth. So, we are once again requesting three (3) Dana assistants for summer 2009.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Anthony George Pastore (2004)

Portuguese Immigrant Letters

This proposal is linked to a summer scholarly project in the District Archive of Faro, southern Portugal. I am asking for a Dana Research Assistantship for Anthony Pastore, who is currently a student in the Malaga Program. This is a way of enhancing the experience of the students in our abroad programs by extending opportunities that are usually only available on campus. Anthony's work will consist of assisting me with research in the District Archive of Faro. We will work with passport request dossiers. He will review these dossiers looking for the existence of "call letters," write contextual information following my directions, and get the documents ready to be xeroxed or copied by hand. He will work weekdays for a period of three weeks. We will begin working in Faro right after he finishes with classes in Malaga.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Marcelo Borges


Jacob Andrew Rainwater (2011)

House Divided Project

The House Divided Project has benefited from over two dozen interns (Dana and otherwise) over the last several years. They have proven indispensable to our progress which can now be measured in dozens of websites, thousands of K-12 teacher users, and tens of thousands of records, images, documents and other digital resources. During the previous year alone, we produced partnership websites with the Journal of American History, National Civil War Museum and Pennsyvlania Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission that feature the by-lined work of Dana research interns. In 2010, we are preparing for the public launch of our main database or research engine on the Civil War era in time of the 150th anniversary of the conflict, which begins in April 2011. We need our Dana help more than ever and this summer, in particular, we would like to apply for three interns --two for our usual work of digital history and one specialist in GIS to work with our project and Jim Ciarrocca on developing more GIS-enhanced maps for the era.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Richard Thomas Robinson (2008)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

We began the House Divided project on our own in summer 2004 and since summer 2005 we have received significant support from the R&D Committee. As you know, we are hoping to build the premier web portal for students and teachers interested in the coming of the American Civil War. In this endeavor, we aim to create a digital archive of various primary sources, including newspaper articles, letters, diaries, recollections and images. We were interested in this period because Dickinson College was at the center of the story. It was quite literally a "house divided" between northern and southern students and its alumni were some of the most important figures in the sectional crisis. Now, we are heading into the final run-up to our public launch, curretly set for March 2007 (on the 150th anniversary of the Dred Scott decision). We hope to use three Dana interns during the academic year to prepare for this public presentation.

Term Funded:Year 2007
Professor: John Osborne


Zachary Irving Rosenberg (2009)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

We are in the process of launching the House Divided website at various teacher training workshops beginning in March and July 2007. The website aspires to offer teachers, students and the general public greater understanding of the coming of the Civil War by using the documents and stories of Dickinson College as a window into the turbulent era. We have been using four student interns each summer and academic year and need to continue at this level for the foreseeable future. However, we can reimburse R&D for one of these students using funds from our NEH grants and general project budget. Still, we prefer to use the Dana umbrella to recruit and designate all of the interns in order to keep everything as simple as possible. All the interns do similar work -editing, transcribing and digitizing historical documents and assisting with the preparations for the teacher workshops (which serve as our primary means of advertising the website).

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Zachary Irving Rosenberg (2009)

NEH Summer Inst Pinsker

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Matt Pinsker


Brandon Matthew Rothenberg (2011)

House Divided Project

With the impending 150th anniversary of the Civil War fast approaching (2011-15), the Cumberland Valley needs to explore new ways to highlight for visitors its extraordinary significance in that defining conflict. The House Divided Project at Dickinson College and the Cumberland County Historical Society plan to work together to build a dynamic website featuring dramatic stories from the era that will enhance a series of walking and driving tours developed around Civil War era themes. These combined resources will together enable a wide variety of visitors (teachers & students, families, heritage tour groups, etc.) to consider extending their stay in the Cumberland Valley and to better appreciate the role of the region in both the coming of the war and during the conflict itself.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Matt Pinsker


Julia Sanguinetti (2014)

Multiple Immigration Narratives from Patagonia: Re-visiting Argentina´s Immigration Paradigm

This project uses oral history narratives to analyze the ways in which migrants from different origins position themselves in the dominant narrative of Argentina as a country made by (European) immigrants. The variety of immigrants to the Patagonia city of Comodoro Rivadavia and its surrounding company towns interviewed by faculty and students during the Patagonia Mosaics-including European, Latin American, and internal migrants-makes it a unique opportunity to challenge dominant views about immigration and nation-building in Argentina. The Dana Research Assistant will work on interview transcriptions.

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Marcelo Borges


Ryan Christian Sarno (2009)

Digitizing Sources for African History

As the first Africanist in the History Department and as a new teacher, I would like to digitalize a wide range of images for use in my two-semester African history core. I currently use overhead transparencies and books with post-its to provide examples of significant artifacts, maps, and historical images of architecture and people. My plan is to digitalize these myriad sources and then present them in power-point slide shows. The digitalization will improve the effectiveness of my lectures and enhance the learning experience for my students.

Term Funded:Spring 2007
Professor: Jeremy Ball


David B Schwerin (2007)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

We began the House Divided project on our own in summer 2004 and since summer 2005 we have received significant support from the R&D Committee. As you know, we are hoping to build the premier web portal for students and teachers interested in the coming of the American Civil War. In this endeavor, we aim to create a digital archive of various primary sources, including newspaper articles, letters, diaries, recollections and images. We were interested in this period because Dickinson College was at the center of the story. It was quite literally a "house divided" between northern and southern students and its alumni were some of the most important figures in the sectional crisis. Now, we are heading into the final run-up to our public launch, curretly set for March 2007 (on the 150th anniversary of the Dred Scott decision). We hope to use three Dana interns during the academic year to prepare for this public presentation.

Term Funded:Year 2007
Professor: James Gerencser


Timothy Andrew Smith (2011)

House Divided Project

The House Divided Project has been in the works for five years but is just now preparing for our public launch in April 2011. The project is a wide-ranging web-based and workshop initiative designed to improve K-12 and undergraduate teaching of the Civil War era during the conflict's 150th anniversary. We have already built more than a dozen websites and helped train over 1,500 educators over the last few years with the help of nearly 40 student interns and generous R&D Committee support. You can view a project index at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/sites and also see there various reviews of our efforts from sources such as Civil War Times magazine ("one of the most compelling online sesquicentennial projects"). Dana interns have helped build both our project as well as several partnership sites with organizations such as the Journal of American History and the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. Most recently, our summer Danas each wrote essays that we published online in a new journal that features clickable footnotes and other multi-media enhancements (see http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/sites/journal). Our next round of interns will help build virtual maps, post at our widely read blog, contribute to the online journal and assist in the public events surrounding our April 2011 launch.

Term Funded: 2011
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Rebecca Burton Solnit (2012)

House Divided Project

The House Divided Project has benefited from over two dozen interns (Dana and otherwise) over the last several years. They have proven indispensable to our progress which can now be measured in dozens of websites, thousands of K-12 teacher users, and tens of thousands of records, images, documents and other digital resources. During the previous year alone, we produced partnership websites with the Journal of American History, National Civil War Museum and Pennsyvlania Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission that feature the by-lined work of Dana research interns. In 2010, we are preparing for the public launch of our main database or research engine on the Civil War era in time of the 150th anniversary of the conflict, which begins in April 2011. We need our Dana help more than ever and this summer, in particular, we would like to apply for three interns --two for our usual work of digital history and one specialist in GIS to work with our project and Jim Ciarrocca on developing more GIS-enhanced maps for the era.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Evan Turnesa Sparling (2008)

Exiled Spanish Youth in the USSR, 1937-52

This proposal is for support of a new book project investigating the life and education of children exiled from Spain to the Soviet Union during the Spanish Civil War. I am requesting two students, fluent in Spanish and Russian, to broaden and annotate a Spanish-language bibliography and to create a database of Spanish children and teachers from Russian-language archival material I collected during my last trip to Moscow. The only Russian scholar to research this topic has failed to ask anything about the children's education and upbringing. Spanish scholars have conducted some oral histories on the topic, but none have used the archive of the Spanish orphanages in Moscow. Because so many of these children went on to prominent careers, including about 200 who aided Castro in his revolution, scholars need to know more about how their formative years in the Soviet system.

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: Karl Qualls


Elizabeth D Stokely (2008)

Patagonia Mosaic Virtual Museum and Resource Center

Since 2001, faculty-student research teams have participated in the three editions of the Patagonia Mosaic project. In collaboration with faculty from the National University of Patagonia and the community of Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina, this interdisciplinary project focuses on a cross-cultural analysis of immigration, labor, community life, and memory through fieldwork and historical research. Results of the Patagonia Mosaic initiative are available in the mosaic's Virtual Museum and Resource Center which has also been created in collaboration between faculty and students. The Museum contains multimedia exhibits around central themes in the history of the community of Comodoro Rivadavia and its company towns: migratory experiences, gender and work, community life, family life, and public memory. In addition, the Resource Center contains a searchable collection of historical photographs and documents. The Dana Research assistants will work on editing and updating the museum exhibits and the collection of historical photographs and documents. Since 2001, faculty-student research teams have participated in the three editions of the Patagonia Mosaic project. In collaboration with faculty from the National University of Patagonia and the community of Comodoro Rivadavia, Argentina, this interdisciplinary project focuses on a cross-cultural analysis of immigration, labor, community life, and memory through fieldwork and historical research. Results of the Patagonia Mosaic initiative are available in the mosaic's Virtual Museum and Resource Center which has also been created in collaboration between faculty and students. The Museum contains multimedia exhibits around central themes in the history of the community of Comodoro Rivadavia and its company towns: migratory experiences, gender and work, community life, family life, and public memory. In addition

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: Marcelo Borges


Leah Adair Suhrstedt (2007)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

We began the House Divided project on our own in summer 2004. We are hoping to build the premier web portal for students and teachers interested in the coming of the American Civil War. In this endeavor, we aim to create a digital archive of various primary sources, including newspaper articles, letters, diaries, recollections and images. We were interested in this period because Dickinson College was at the center of the story. It was quite literally a "house divided" between northern and southern students and its alumni were some of the most important figures in the sectional crisis. (also please see attached memo)

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


Russell Charles Toris (2011)

House Divided Project

We would like to continue to receive three (3) Dana interns for the House Divided Project for 2008-09. We have launched a draft or beta version of the main website at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu and have developed and launched several related sites, including a blog at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu; a digital classroom on the Underground Railroad at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/ugrr; an innovative virtual field trip site that uses historical map overlays on Google Earth at http://housedivided.dickinson.edu/fieldtrips as well as many more, both online and currently in development. Over the last three years, our Dana interns have been essential to the development of the project and will continue to be so in 2008-09. Our interns conduct research, help transcribe and annotate historical documents and assist with data entry and a wide variety of technical tasks. We are in urgent need of additional help as we prepare for the completion of our project on the eve of the 150th anniversary of the Civil War in spring 2011.

Term Funded:Year 2009
Professor: John Osborne


Joanne Leigh Williams (2009)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

We began the House Divided project on our own in summer 2004 and since summer 2005 we have received significant support from the R&D Committee. We have been hoping to build the premier web portal for students and teachers interested in the coming of the American Civil War. We currently have more than 1,500 historic documents and 1,000 images ready for web-based presentation. In 2007, we launched a web-based resource center on the Underground Railroad and sometime this year we hope to launch the full website covering the period 1846-1863. We have also been deeply engaged in various K-12 teacher-training initiatives. In summer 2006 and summer 2007 we hosted a total of 200 teachers from over 40 different states in workshops on the Underground Railroad sponsored by the NEH. We also hosted more than 65 educators in spring 2007 on the 150th anniversary of the Dred Scott Case -an event co-sponsored by the National Constitution Center.

Term Funded:Year 2008
Professor: John Osborne


Alissa J Zawoyski (2007)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

The Congressional Research Service (CRS) provides nonpartisan, often historically minded, policy research at the request of Members of Congress. CRS reports have earned a reputation for being thorough, objective, and quite helpful to policy makers. I propose to use a Dana Research Assistantship to experiment with the idea that professors and students at the Consortium schools like Dickinson might be able to offer something similar to policy makers in Harrisburg. Donna Cooper, the Policy Director in the Governor's Office, has expressed an interest in participating in such a joint project with professors and students. To help launch this effort, I propose working with a Dana Research Assistant to respond to various requests from the Governor's office during the course of several weeks in the fall and spring semester. Given my area of expertise (American political history), the nature of the assignments will primarily concern policy history and the product will be a series of detailed 15-20 page memos.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Matthew Pinsker


International Business & Management

Timothy Eric Dressel (2014)

Cross Sector Collaboration to Promote Sustainable Development

Cross Sector Collaboration to Promote Sustainable Development

Term Funded:summer 2013
Professor: Michael Fratantuono


Wei Du (2013)

Executive Compensation and Misery Index

Excessive executive compensation is cited as one of the causes of the economic crisis of 2008. This study focuses on the relation between executive compensation and so-called "misery index." Misery index is addition of the unemployment rate and the inflation rate, assuming that high unemployment and inflation create economic and social costs. Two hypotheses may be tested in this study. High level of misery index means that both unemployment rate and inflation rate are high, which is called "stagflation." Stagflation is definitely the evidence of economic recession, the executive compensation may decrease. Therefore, the relation between executive compensation and misery index will be negative if this hypothesis holds. However, as public criticizes, the relative income level of executives may increase even in the recession period. If this hypothesis holds, the relation between executive compensation and misery index will be positive.

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Kim Won Yong


Michael Edward Geosits (2009)

Conversion of course materials to Excel 2007

Managerial economics, INBM 220, teaches managerial decision-making using Excel as a platform for economic analysis. The materials for this course must be revised to accommodate the new version of Excel and new materials must be created for the newly created fundamentals of accounting class, INBM 110. The user interface for Excel 2007 is reorganized along functional lines in a fashion that must be incorporated into existing course materials. Alterations in those materials must also be made due to reorganization of this and other courses within the INBM curriculum.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Stephen Erfle


Pauline Hovy (2010)

The Relationship Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance: What's the Role of Strategy?

The link between a firm's corporate social performance and its financial performance has been fiercely debated and widely studied. The results of these studies are often contradictory and, therefore, inconclusive. A recently proposed theory of strategic corporate social responsibility, developed by Michael Porter and Mark Kramer, posits that the connection between a company's social and financial performance is moderated by how the company chooses to implement social responsibility. Specifically, this theory hypothesizes that there is a positive relationship between social and financial performance when, and only when, companies choose to systematically align their investments in social responsibility with their business strategy and activities. The purpose of this research project is to empirically test this theory through the analysis of business activities and socially responsive activities as reported on corporate websites and in annual reports. Another goal of this research is to develop a measure of strategic corporate social responsibility.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Helen Takacs


Holly Anne Kirkpatrick (2005)

Research for book which involves interactive learning materials that help students learn economics

The book I am working on is the first intermediate microeconomics text to incorporate interactive graphics for all graphic material in the text. Microeconomics heavily utilizes graphs to explain the behavior of individuals and firms, and many students find the graphs difficult to understand and interpret. This text provides the visual learner with alternatives that they have not previously had in learning since they can actively move the graphs with sliders and click boxes as part of the learning experience. I currently have a draft of approximately half of the text (10 of 20 chapters) and I hope to come close to completing a draft of the other 10 chapters by the time I resume teaching in Spring 2005. This would not complete the project since a workbook and instructor's manual must also be written, but these can be attacked once I begin teaching again next Spring.

Term Funded:Year 2005
Professor: Stephen Erfle


Susan C Kuonqui (2006)

Help prepare textbook manuscript for publication

The book I am working on is the first intermediate microeconomics text to incorporate interactive graphics for all graphic material in the text. Microeconomics heavily utilizes graphs to explain the behavior of individuals and firms, and many students find the graphs difficult to understand and interpret. This text provides the visual learner with alternatives that they have not previously had in learning since they can actively move the graphs with sliders and click boxes as part of the learning experience.

Term Funded:Fall 2005
Professor: Steven Erfle


Susan C Kuonqui (2006)

Create interactive graphical materials used to learn microeconomic theory

As I completed work on the two projects for intermediate microeconomics texts by other authors during this summer and into the fall, I came to the conclusion that I needed to move from being a content provider to author of the actual text in order to maximize the benefits of the dynamic diagrams that I have been working on for the last couple of years. As a result, I have begun working in earnest on an entire text that utilizes dynamic graphics. Since this is, in large part a continuation of the proposal I submitted for the academic year, I will not rehash the entire rationale for this approach. I attach a copy of the outline of the text that I currently am working on, instead.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Stephen Erfle


Suin Lee (2014)

The Effect of Environmental Performance on Managerial Incentive Structure

Environmental issues in corporate governance research recently get more attention. Especially, since environmental issues are related to managerial decision, environmental performance should be considered in determining the managerial incentives. Previous studies show that environment performance is positively correlated with firm value and performance. However, although environmental performance is heavily determined by managerial risk-taking behavior, we can hardly find the studies that investigate the relation between environmental performance and managerial incentive structure. Therefore, what we are willing to find is how managerial incentive is dynamically affected by the environmental performance. Furthermore, we are investigating whether the effect may be more critical and obvious in the polluting industries. Our hypotheses for the project are 1) Long-term based managerial incentives may lead positive effect on environmental performance 2) The possibility of environmental litigation is increased by the short-term based managerial incentives 3) The relation between environmental performance and managerial incentive structure is stronger in the polluting industries.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Won Yong Kim


Suin Lee (2014)

The Effect of Environmental Performance on Managerial Incentive Structure

Environmental issues in corporate governance research recently get more attention. Especially, since environmental issues are related to managerial decision, environmental performance should be considered in determining the managerial incentives. Previous studies show that environment performance is positively correlated with firm value and performance. However, although environmental performance is heavily determined by managerial risk-taking behavior, we can hardly find the studies that investigate the relation between environmental performance and managerial incentive structure. Therefore, what we are willing to find is how managerial incentive is dynamically affected by the environmental performance. Furthermore, we are investigating whether the effect may be more critical and obvious in the polluting industries. Our hypotheses for the project are 1) Long-term based managerial incentives may lead positive effect on environmental performance 2) The possibility of environmental litigation is increased by the short-term based managerial incentives 3) The relation between environmental performance and managerial incentive structure is stronger in the polluting industries.

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Won Young Kim


Xiyu Li (2012)

Analysis of Active Schools Data from 2009-2011 school years

Xiyu would be allowed to develop her own research project with the data I am working with from the Pennsylvania Department of Health's Active Schools Program together with the data I am currently gathering under the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation grant. This data allows a direct comparison of change in physical activity performance levels as well as BMI across the course of a school year for students who involved in daily physical activity in their school with others who are in schools who do not have daily physical activity built into the school day. As I have noted in my proposal, there are many other things that could be done with the data. Determining exactly where she will decide to focus is not something I want to force on her. I would prefer that she explore possible options before deciding on a specific project.

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: Stephen Erfle


Kirsten Michelle Midura (2008)

Role of state governments in attracting and regulating foreign direct investment

I have been invited to deliver the Springer Lecture in international business at Lebanon Valley College for 2008. The lecture will take place on April 10, 2008 at Lebanon Valley College. My lecture will be on the role state governments have played in the recent past in attracting foreign direct investment (FDI) to their particular states. I expect to build on the research and develop a paper worthy of publication in the Fall 2008. My thesis for my LLM degree in international law was on legal aspects of FDI in the US. Published as an article in the International Lawyer, a publication of the American Bar Association, the research delved into the federal government's role in attracting and regulating FDI in the United States. At the time, the states played little if any role in regulating or attracting FDI. In response to a loss of manufacturing jobs to outsourcing and to the globalization of markets, over the last 27 years the role of state governments, and to a lesser degree local governments, has changed dramatically. Beginning February 1, 2008, I will investigate how the role has changed and report on the effects the changes have had on the quantity and quality of foreign direct investments. Although changes have occurred in most states, a few states either because of necessity or competitive advantages have built organizations and changed policies, rules, and regulations to attract FDI into their states. Some states compete fiercely and outdo neighboring states to bring a particular type of FDI; others, have been accused of meddling into foreign policy to the detriment of our national interests. This research will examine these issues.

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: Adis Vila


Jeffrey Barton Miller (2001)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Year 2000
Professor: Michael Fratantuono


Amanda Blaire West (2010)

Role of state governments in attracting and regulating foreign direct investment

I am building on the Springer Lecture in International Business at Lebanon Valley College for 2008 that I delivered on April 10, 2008. My lecture was on the role state governments have played in the recent past in attracting foreign direct investment (FDI). I built on the lecture to develop a paper that I will present at the annual meeting of the Academy of Legal Studies in Business (ALSB) on August 15, 2008. I am requesting this Dana Grant to: delve deeper into the research I have done on four states, FL, IN, SC, and PA including evaluating one perceived successful investment in each state; examine any regulation of FDI the four states have introduced; and, evaluate the responses these successful states have had to the growing criticism of FDI. For example, FL's Gov. Crist came under attack for a mission he took to the UK, France, Russia and Spain in July 2008. Although Gov. Crist argues that the Mission will pay dividends for Florida, not everyone is enthusiastic about expenses incurred by the Governor to develop FDI (see article). My thesis for my LLM degree in international law was on legal aspects of FDI in the US. Published as an article in the International Lawyer, a publication of the American Bar Association, the research delved into the federal government's role in attracting and regulating FDI in the United States. Then states played little if any role in attracting or regulating FDI. In response to a loss of manufacturing jobs to outsourcing and to the globalization of markets, today state governments, and to a lesser degree local governments, play a key role. Beginning August 25, 2008, fresh from delivering the paper at the ALSB annual meeting , and meeting with my ALSB newly assigned mentor, Clyde Stoltenberg from Wichita State

Term Funded:Year 2009
Professor: Adis Vila


International Studies

John Clayton Butler (2004)

The European Union: Manufacturing an Identity

The European Union's rhetoric is seldom reflected in reality. Despite public statements claiming that the EU has a "rendez-vous with history," the elites seem more convinced than the populace. Both functionalist and neo-functionalist theories argue that the way to peace is through integration. By converting the government elites and epistemic communities to the cause of European unity, peace will follow. Both theories are very elitist. As a result, as observed by John Peet in the Economist, the people being left behind. Over the past 10 years, some more integrationist-minded member states, especially Germany and the Benelux have argued for a democratizing of the integration process. Without a European identity, the people will not come on board, and without democratic support for such a project, European integration will wither. The goal is to bring EU decison-making closer to the average person and to foster a European identity. One of my students, John Butler, wrote a term-paper on the role of sports in the EU. Why is there no EU Olympic team? Why is there no pan-European soccer league? Competing at international sports events as representatives of the EU would serve as a constant reminder, both at home and abroad, of the existence of the EU as a distinct entity. John uncovered a fascinating question: could sports be an ideal way to help create a European identity for both EU citizens and for the world? While much of Butler's preliminary research was good, the project needs more research and to be placed in theoretical perspective. Butler is willing to collaborate with me on this project where he will be given full credit as co-author. We want to grow this paper into a full-fledged, publishable piece. I will submit the paper for presentation at the European Union Studies Associa

Term Funded:Fall 2002
Professor: Stephanie Anderson


Aimee Boisvert Eremita (2003)

The European Union: Manufacturing an Identity

The European Union's rhetoric is seldom reflected in reality. Despite public statements claiming that the EU has a "rendez-vous with history," the elites seem more convinced than the populace. Both functionalist and neo-functionalist theories argue that the way to peace is through integration. By converting the government elites and epistemic communities to the cause of European unity, peace will follow. Both theories are very elitist. As a result, as observed by John Peet in the Economist, the people being left behind. Over the past 10 years, some more integrationist-minded member states, especially Germany and the Benelux have argued for a democratizing of the integration process. Without a European identity, the people will not come on board, and without democratic support for such a project, European integration will wither. The goal is to bring EU decison-making closer to the average person and to foster a European identity.

Term Funded:Spring 2003
Professor: Stephanie Anderson


Library & Information Systems (LIS)

Natalie Cortez (2009)

125 Years of Coeducation at Dickinson College

In the fall of 2009, Dickinson College will celebrate 125 years of coeducation. This approaching anniversary provides an opportune moment in which to study and reflect upon the unique experiences of Dickinson's alumnae, a topic on which a limited amount of scholarship currently exists. To this end, the staff of Archives and Special Collections would like to hire two interns during Spring 2009 to assist in identifying relevant primary sources in preparation for the creation of a year-long exhibit (to be mounted in Summer 2009) documenting women's experiences at the College. Under the guidance of the project supervisors, the interns will search the College's historical records and document their findings by creating a blog that will provide the intellectual foundation for the subsequent exhibit and serve as a resource center for Dickinson and outside researchers. As the interns encounter items of interest, they will have the ability to post stories summarizing their findings, to create a bibliography of relevant resources, to develop timelines of noteworthy events, and to share digital images of primary sources. While the intent of this project is not to conduct an exhaustive search for all materials regarding coeducation at Dickinson, it is our hope that the exhibit and electronic resource center will serve as catalysts for additional inquiry and dialogue on the topic within the campus community.

Term Funded:Spring 2009
Professor: Malinda Triller


Natalie Cortez (2009)

125 Years of Coeducation at Dickinson College

In the fall of 2009, Dickinson College will celebrate 125 years of coeducation. This approaching anniversary provides an opportune moment in which to study and reflect upon the unique experiences of Dickinson's alumnae, a topic on which a limited amount of scholarship currently exists. To this end, the staff of Archives and Special Collections would like to hire two interns during Spring 2009 to assist in identifying relevant primary sources in preparation for the creation of a year-long exhibit (to be mounted in Summer 2009) documenting women's experiences at the College. Under the guidance of the project supervisors, the interns will search the College's historical records and document their findings by creating a blog that will provide the intellectual foundation for the subsequent exhibit and serve as a resource center for Dickinson and outside researchers. As the interns encounter items of interest, they will have the ability to post stories summarizing their findings, to create a bibliography of relevant resources, to develop timelines of noteworthy events, and to share digital images of primary sources. While the intent of this project is not to conduct an exhaustive search for all materials regarding coeducation at Dickinson, it is our hope that the exhibit and electronic resource center will serve as catalysts for additional inquiry and dialogue on the topic within the campus community.

Term Funded:Spring 2009
Professor: Gerenscer James


Allyson Keiko Glazier (2011)

"Women's Experiences at Dickinson" Exhibit

In the fall of 2009, Dickinson College will celebrate 125 years of coeducation. This approaching anniversary provides an opportune moment in which to study and reflect upon the unique experiences of Dickinson's alumnae, a topic on which a limited amount of scholarship currently exists. To this end, the staff of Archives and Special Collections would like to hire two interns during Summer 2009 to assist in the creation of a year-long exhibit documenting women's experiences at the College. Under the guidance of the project supervisors, the interns will assist with the following tasks: identifying important themes, issues, events, and stories to address; selecting appropriate archival materials to convey those stories; preparing items for display by applying appropriate preservation measures; physically arranging the items in the display cases; and conducting original research in order to create descriptive labels. It is our hope that the exhibit will serve as a catalyst for additional inquiry and dialogue within the campus community, and that it will also be useful as a resource for classroom instruction, research, and alumni reminiscence.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Malinda Triller


Michelle Suzanne Hadley-Ambord (2009)

125 Years of Coeducation at Dickinson College

In the fall of 2009, Dickinson College will celebrate 125 years of coeducation. This approaching anniversary provides an opportune moment in which to study and reflect upon the unique experiences of Dickinson's alumnae, a topic on which a limited amount of scholarship currently exists. To this end, the staff of Archives and Special Collections would like to hire two interns during Spring 2009 to assist in identifying relevant primary sources in preparation for the creation of a year-long exhibit (to be mounted in Summer 2009) documenting women's experiences at the College. Under the guidance of the project supervisors, the interns will search the College's historical records and document their findings by creating a blog that will provide the intellectual foundation for the subsequent exhibit and serve as a resource center for Dickinson and outside researchers. As the interns encounter items of interest, they will have the ability to post stories summarizing their findings, to create a bibliography of relevant resources, to develop timelines of noteworthy events, and to share digital images of primary sources. While the intent of this project is not to conduct an exhaustive search for all materials regarding coeducation at Dickinson, it is our hope that the exhibit and electronic resource center will serve as catalysts for additional inquiry and dialogue on the topic within the campus community.

Term Funded:Spring 2009
Professor: Malinda Triller


Peter C Lake (2006)

House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862

In summer 2004, we began working with experts at LIS to develop a web-based research project that aspired to become a premier web portal for students and teachers interested in the coming of the American Civil War. We plan to call the website "House Divided: A View of America, 1846-1862." Using the college community as a starting point and the period from 1846-1862 as a dramatic frame, the website will detail in day-by-day format how the crisis evolved and why fellow citizens from that era came to see each other as mortal enemies. The House Divided website will feature some of the college's unique archival resources - student diaries, letters, and recollections as well as a broad selection of the nation's daily newspapers and other relevant primary sources.

Term Funded:Year 2006
Professor: James Gerencser


Colin Winthrop Macfarlane (2012)

Finding History (book project)

Finding History is a book-length guide to research methodology and information literacy application for undergraduate scholars of history. My proposal has recently been accepted by Scarecrow Press and I am expecting a contract in the coming weeks. My book will help history students perform historical inquiry efficiently and with the standard, scholarly finding tools used by professionals. Finding History includes step-by-step instructions for discovering historical evidence using library catalogs, databases, and websites. It is illustrated with search samples and tables providing a wealth of scholarly starting points. Parts of the book have been used successfully with Dickinson history majors. I require additional assistance from an intern for the following: reorganizing chapters and testing instructions of new sections (both of these at request of external reviewers); creating high quality images for the book's illustrations; proofreading and editing the final draft; preparing and mailing requests for permission to reproduce images of copyrighted material; and completing the final stages of research on the book's case study, a biography of Dickinson alumnus John A.J. Creswell, class of 1848. This research includes citing and annotating primary and secondary sources according to the Chicago Manual of Style. I expect to submit a final draft to Scarecrow by the fall semester.

Term Funded: 2011
Professor: Christine Bombaro


Casey Candice Michalski (2010)

Development of Spatial Literacy within the Dickinson Community

Spatial Literacy is a type of thinking that focuses on understanding the importance of geographic space and the relationships formed by this space. A powerful technology for engaging spatial thinking is called Geographic Information Systems (GIS), which provides sophisticated tools for collecting, managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data. This project seeks to enhance the awareness of spatial literacy and increase the competency for GIS technology across the Dickinson community through the use of workshops, outreach programs, web portals, tutorials, and learning seminars. Specifically, the Dana Research Assistant will be tasked with developing a program methodology for raising the awareness of Spatial Literacy and GIS technology within the Dickinson Community utilizing the various activities listed above, assisting with implementing these activities within the context of that program, and assessing the overall success of these various efforts as a means for enhancing spatial literacy within an academic environment.

Term Funded:Year 2009
Professor: James Ciarrocca


Casey Candice Michalski (2010)

Development of Spatial Literacy within the Dickinson Community

Spatial Literacy is a type of thinking that focuses on understanding the importance of geographic space and the relationships formed by this space. A powerful technology for engaging spatial thinking is called Geographic Information Systems (GIS), which provides sophisticated tools for collecting, managing, analyzing, and visualizing spatial data. This project seeks to enhance the awareness of spatial literacy and increase the competency for GIS technology across the Dickinson community through the use of workshops, outreach programs, web portals, tutorials, and learning seminars. Specifically, the Dana Research Assistant will be tasked with developing a program methodology for raising the awareness of Spatial Literacy and GIS technology within the Dickinson Community utilizing the various activities listed above, assisting with implementing these activities within the context of that program, and assessing the overall success of these various efforts as a means for enhancing spatial literacy within an academic environment.

Term Funded:Spring 2010
Professor: James Ciarrocca


W John Monopoli (2011)

Finding History (book project)

Finding History is a book-length guide to research methodology and information literacy application for undergraduate scholars of history. This book will help new history students, particularly those intending to declare a history major, to perform historical inquiry efficiently and with the standard, scholarly finding tools used by professionals. Finding History includes practical, step-by-step instructions for discovering historical evidence using library catalogs, databases, and websites; and it is illustrated with search samples and tables providing a wealth of scholarly starting points. Parts of the book have been used successfully with Dickinson history majors. I would need assistance from a student with the following: researching appropriate representative webpages and scholarly articles, proofreading drafts, checking all instructions for clarity and accuracy, testing instructions on other students, preparing and mailing correspondence, creating screen captures for illustrations, checking that any websites mentioned are still active and function as described, and small writing assignments.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Christine Bombaro


W John Monopoli (2011)

Finding History (book project)

Finding History is a book-length guide to research methodology and information literacy application for undergraduate scholars of history. This book will help history students perform historical inquiry efficiently and with the standard, scholarly finding tools used by professionals. Finding History includes step-by-step instructions for discovering historical evidence using library catalogs, databases, and websites. It is illustrated with search samples and tables providing a wealth of scholarly starting points. Parts of the book have been used successfully with Dickinson history majors. I require additional assistance from my intern for the following: proofreading final chapters, testing instructions, preparing and mailing publisher correspondence, and transcribing and annotating documents we found during several research trips. Finally, I would like to John to complete a case study he started writing for possible inclusion in the book, pending approval from a publisher. The case study demonstrates the effectiveness of the methodology and recounts the results of our research trips.

Term Funded:Spring 2011
Professor: Christine Bombaro


Caroline E Radesky (2009)

125 Years of Coeducation at Dickinson College

In the fall of 2009, Dickinson College will celebrate 125 years of coeducation. This approaching anniversary provides an opportune moment in which to study and reflect upon the unique experiences of Dickinson's alumnae, a topic on which a limited amount of scholarship currently exists. To this end, the staff of Archives and Special Collections would like to hire two interns during Spring 2009 to assist in identifying relevant primary sources in preparation for the creation of a year-long exhibit (to be mounted in Summer 2009) documenting women's experiences at the College. Under the guidance of the project supervisors, the interns will search the College's historical records and document their findings by creating a blog that will provide the intellectual foundation for the subsequent exhibit and serve as a resource center for Dickinson and outside researchers. As the interns encounter items of interest, they will have the ability to post stories summarizing their findings, to create a bibliography of relevant resources, to develop timelines of noteworthy events, and to share digital images of primary sources. While the intent of this project is not to conduct an exhaustive search for all materials regarding coeducation at Dickinson, it is our hope that the exhibit and electronic resource center will serve as catalysts for additional inquiry and dialogue on the topic within the campus community.

Term Funded:Spring 2009
Professor: Malinda Triller


Stephanie Read (2016)

Carlisle Indian Industrial School Project

To develop a comprehensive digital resource for the study of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School (CIIS) by bringing together widely dispersed materials to aid research, and by serving as a virtual home for the ongoing work of an active CIIS community of memory and inquiry. The CIIS is a major site of memory for many Native peoples. The CIIS and the indigenous boarding school movement represent a very active area of research among scholars, teachers, students (both native and non-native), area residents, and descendants across the U.S. and the world. Scholars are working with descsendants of CIIS students who are learning from and contributing to this research. In the last decade, not only have many scholarly and popular books, articles, and documentaries related to the CIIS been produced, but also a number of symposia and community events have been organized. One example is the "Carlisle, PA: Site of Indigenous Histories, Memories, and Reclamations" Symposium held at Dickinson College in October 2012. This academic year's goals: • Make previously digitized materials accessible via a dedicated website utilizing appropriate content management tools. Intern will edit image files; will evaluate, decipher, interpret and describe file contents; will transcribe select information; and will upload files to online resource and enter appropriate metadata. See attached project description.

Term Funded:Fall 2013
Professor: Malinda Triller-Doran


Allison Marie Schell (2011)

"Women's Experiences at Dickinson" Exhibit

In the fall of 2009, Dickinson College will celebrate 125 years of coeducation. This approaching anniversary provides an opportune moment in which to study and reflect upon the unique experiences of Dickinson's alumnae, a topic on which a limited amount of scholarship currently exists. To this end, the staff of Archives and Special Collections would like to hire two interns during Summer 2009 to assist in the creation of a year-long exhibit documenting women's experiences at the College. Under the guidance of the project supervisors, the interns will assist with the following tasks: identifying important themes, issues, events, and stories to address; selecting appropriate archival materials to convey those stories; preparing items for display by applying appropriate preservation measures; physically arranging the items in the display cases; and conducting original research in order to create descriptive labels. It is our hope that the exhibit will serve as a catalyst for additional inquiry and dialogue within the campus community, and that it will also be useful as a resource for classroom instruction, research, and alumni reminiscence.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Jim Gerencser


Frank Charles Vitale (2016)

Carlisle Indian Industrial School Project

To develop a comprehensive digital resource for the study of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School (CIIS) by bringing together widely dispersed materials to aid research, and by serving as a virtual home for the ongoing work of an active CIIS community of memory and inquiry. The CIIS is a major site of memory for many Native peoples. The CIIS and the indigenous boarding school movement represent a very active area of research among scholars, teachers, students (both native and non-native), area residents, and descendants across the U.S. and the world. Scholars are working with descsendants of CIIS students who are learning from and contributing to this research. In the last decade, not only have many scholarly and popular books, articles, and documentaries related to the CIIS been produced, but also a number of symposia and community events have been organized. One example is the "Carlisle, PA: Site of Indigenous Histories, Memories, and Reclamations" Symposium held at Dickinson College in October 2012. This academic year's goals: • Make previously digitized materials accessible via a dedicated website utilizing appropriate content management tools. Intern will edit image files; will evaluate, decipher, interpret and describe file contents; will transcribe select information; and will upload files to online resource and enter appropriate metadata. See attached project description.

Term Funded:summer 2013
Professor: James Gerencser


Frank Charles Vitale (2016)

Carlisle Industrial Indian School Project

To develop a comprehensive digital resource for the study of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School (CIIS) by bringing together widely dispersed materials to aid research, and by serving as a virtual home for the ongoing work of an active CIIS community of memory and inquiry. The CIIS is a major site of memory for many Native peoples. The CIIS and the indigenous boarding school movement represent a very active area of research among scholars, teachers, students (both native and non-native), area residents, and descendants across the U.S. and the world. Scholars are working with descsendants of CIIS students who are learning from and contributing to this research. In the last decade, not only have many scholarly and popular books, articles, and documentaries related to the CIIS been produced, but also a number of symposia and community events have been organized. One example is the "Carlisle, PA: Site of Indigenous Histories, Memories, and Reclamations" Symposium held at Dickinson College in October 2012. This summer's goals: To digitize research material from the National Archives. Make the digitized materials accessible via a dedicated website utilizing appropriate content management tools.

Term Funded:summer 2013
Professor: James Gerencser


Mathematics & Computer Science

Elisabeth Shyjka Baute (1994)

New Parallel Parsing Techniques

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: Ann Hill


Marc Julien Besson (2015)

Research in Graph Theory

This project involves original research in graph theory. Messon and Tesman will be considering variations on T-colorgs of graphs. This is a fairly new area of research in graphy theory. The team will be considering optimization-type problems for various classes of graphs. This work is related to research that Tesman has been working on for a number of years.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Barry Tesman


Travis Martin Brown (2013)

Sustainability Labs for Calculus

Sustainability Labs for Calculus

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: Barry Tesman


James Patrick Cain (1994)

Identifying the Impact of Corrective Software Maintenance

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Joel Henry


Qian Chen (2000)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Year 2000
Professor: Nancy Baxter-Hastings


Kathleen Ann Demarest (1989)

Upgrading an Argon Plasma System

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1988
Professor: Guy Vandegrift


Aleksey Denega (2003)

Characterization of the Pollincation Routing Algorithm for Mobile Ad-hoc Networks

In a mobile ad-hoc network the nodes of network move about their environment and communicate with each other over wireless channels without the benefit of a suitable preexisting infrastructure (e.g. cell towers). In this environment two nodes can communicate directly with each other only if they are within the range it may be possible for them to communicate indirectly by relaying their communications through intermediary nodes. The process of discovering and maintaining communication routes between nodes is handled by a routing algorithm. The Pollination routing algorithm performs routing in a mobile ad-hoc wireless network. The algorithm is based on the concept of pollination (as in bees!) and combines aspects of current mobile ad-hoc routing algorithms with ideas from ant-based (as in ants!) algorithms for routing wired networks. A prototype of the Pollination algorithm has been developed. Simulation results based on this prototype show the performance of the Pollination algorithm to be comparable to several existing mobile ad-hoc routing algorithms. The prototype implementation of the Pollination algorithm did not fully optimize the Pollination algorithm nor has it been completely characterized in terms of all of its parameters. This project aims explore several optimizations to the algorithm and to perform a more complete characterization of the algorithm's performance with regard to its parameters. The performance of the optimized algorithm will be compared to existing mobile ad-hoc routing algorithms.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Grant Braught


Joseph Thomas Devlin (1991)

Computer Simulation of Evolution of the Spectrum of G2 Stars

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1990
Professor: Mark Bottorff


Jun Ding (1992)

Computer Aided Instruction System for Graph Theory Algorithms

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1990
Professor: Nancy Hastings,Tesman


Fabio Ariel Drucker (2011)

Fast Superpixel Algorithms

A superpixel is a small region of an image that lies within a single object. Superpixels are important because they dramatically improve the computational efficiency of some image analysis algorithms, but computing the superpixels themselves is a difficult computational problem. The author of this proposal recently developed a new superpixel computation technique, termed PathFinder, that runs at least 10 times faster than the fastest previously-published technique. However, significant additional analysis and experimentation are needed to quantify the performance and quality of PathFinder. In addition, generalizations of PathFinder may lead to exciting new methods of motion estimation in video sequences. The project consists of a student and faculty member working together to implement and carry out detailed experiments, rigorously comparing the speed and quality of PathFinder with the best previously-published algorithm. Further, both student and faculty member will collaborate on the development of new techniques for generalizing PathFinder to the motion estimation scenario.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: John MacCormick


Fabio Ariel Drucker (2011)

Symbolic Dynamics for Overlapping Partitions

Dynamical systems is the study of motion. Some of the fundamental quesitons that a dynamicist asks are: is there a fixed point, a periodic orbit, an attractor, or chaos? These are often difficult questions to answer. One tool we use is symbolic dynamics. This simplifies the analysis to the analysis of sequences of numbers. For example, a periodic point may correspond to the sequence (1,2,3,1,2,3,1,...). In this project the student and I will look at a new way to generate symbolic dynamics from a dynamical system. The analysis is more subtle than the classical case, but the payoff is potentially much greater. This is part of a larger research program that I have begun with Jim Wiseman (Agnes Scott College) and Sarah Day (College of William and Mary).

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: David Richeson


Thomas Jerome Edgar (2002)

The Dynamics of Beach Waves

We will create a computer model to simulate breaking ocean waves. We will use this computer model to examine the sequence of maximum wave heights on the beach (that is, we will measure how far up the beach each wave will reach). Our computer model will take into consideration such parameters as the speed of the waves, the height of the waves, the period of the waves and the pitch of the beach. It is our conjecture that as we vary these parameters, the resulting sequence will have some interesting dynamical properties. For instance, for certain parameter values the sequence may be periodic, for others the sequence may be chaotic. The student and professor will study each sequence as a dynamical system and use the tools from that subject to analyze the behavior of the breaking beach waves.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: David Richeson


Shari Jayne Feldman (1989)

Design of Computer Experiences using LOGO to Model Dynamic Mental Images of Geometric Concepts

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1988
Professor: Nancy Baxter Hastings


Lisa Fumiye Fukuhara (1992)

A Bayesian Non-parametric Approach to Tournament Ranking and Design

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1990
Professor: Allan Rossman


Christopher Eric Hanley (1991)

Computer Aided Instruction System for Graph Theory Algorithms

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1989
Professor: Nancy Hastings/Tesman


Linda Ellen Harrold (1994)

Graphical Query Interface for Standard Database Management Systems

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: M. Anthony Kapolka


Scott Mark Hopkins (2004)

Developing Pedagogically Powerful Instructional Materials for an Integrated Course in Functions, Data Analysis and Modeling

The Dana Research Assistant will be a member of the Workshop Precalculus development team, which consists of Allan Rossman from Cal Poly - San Luis Obispo, Priscilla Laws, Kevin Callahan from Cal State - Hayward, and Christa Fratto '94, who began working on the Workshop Mathematics project as a Dana Student Intern in the summer of 1992 and is currently in graduate school at Villanova University. The assistant will participate actively in the design and development of innovative, learner-centered, discovery-based curricular materials. In the process, the research assistant will develop a deeper understanding of one of the most important mathematical ideas: the concept of a function. He or she will learn how to model real-life situations and use statistics to analyze the models. The student assistant will benefit from working closely with the participants in the 2002 Workshop Precalculus Summer Institute, who will represent an international group of universities, colleges and high schools.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Nancy Baxter Hastings


Stephen Benjamin Hughes (1995)

Practical Algorithms for the K-server Problem

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1994
Professor: Anil Shende


Benjamin Charles Krause (2008)

Executing JML Specifications with Constraint Programming

The Java Modeling Language (JML) is an industrial-strength formal specification language that is used to document the interfaces of Java programs, to prove the correctness of implementations with respect to such specifications, and to prove other important properties of programs. In this project, we will continue work on a system for translating a JML specification to a Java program that implements the specification. Although such programs will be too slow and too memory-intensive to replace hand-written implementations, they will be very useful as prototypes and for developing and testing specifications. The translation will use constraint programming techniques, and the primary role of the students in the project will be to write constraint handlers for the built-in types of JML. As JML has a large user and developer community in both academia and industry, this project has the potential make a substantial contribution to the practical use of formal methods.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Timothy Wahls


Wendy Elizabeth Lee (1990)

Development of Programming Language ISETL and Implementation of a New Pedagogical Approach

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1989
Professor: Nancy Baxter-Hastings


Michael Meginnes Livingston (1995)

T-Colorings of Digraphs

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1994
Professor: Barry Tesman


Richard Alan Loomis (1989)

Upgrading an Argon Plasma System

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1988
Professor: Guy Vandegrift


Edwin Jordan Padilla (2016)

Networked Database for the College Farm

Networked Database for the College Farm

Term Funded:fall 2013
Professor: Tim Wahls


Edwin Jordan Padilla (2016)

NSF 085670 STEP Program at Dickinson College

Through this program, Dickinson intends to recruit and matriculate a "science posse" cohort in each of three years beginning in the fall of 2009. The science posse program will have three major components: 1) a four-week summer pre-matriculation program in which students will participate in lab research and a series of enrichment workshops in chemistry and mathematics; 2) a second eight-week summer of research with Dickinson faculty members using our successful model of student/faculty research; and 3) a capstone eight-week summer research experience at off-campus laboratories in major research universities. The program will provide a strong mentoring experience for underrepresented students to support their pursuit of a science major. The successful implementation of this plan will result in the establishment of a cohort of science major role models for future students among our underrepresented minority groups. Results of the program will be disseminated widely within the broader scientific education community so that they may serve as a model for other institutions.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Tim Wahls


Miguel Alejandro Rodriguez (2013)

Optimal Crop Rotation at Dickinson College Farm II

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Richard Forrester


Miguel Alejandro Rodriguez (2013)

Optimal Crop Rotation at the Dickinson College Farm

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: Richard Forrester


Michael Thomas Ryan (2012)

Extending Control Software for the Dickinson Biodiesel Plant

Extending Control Software for the Dickinson Biodiesel Plant

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Tim Wahls


Asir Saeed (2016)

Applying Data Mining to Fracking & Watershed Data

Applying Data Mining to Fracking & Watershed Data

Term Funded:summer 2014
Professor: Tim Wahls


Asir Saeed (2016)

Developing a Mobile/Networked Database for the College Farm

Developing a Mobile/Networked Database for the College Farm

Term Funded:spring 2013
Professor: Tim Wahls


Asir Saeed (2016)

Networked Database for the College Farm

Networked Database for the College Farm

Term Funded:Fall 2013
Professor: Tim Wahls


Dmitry Vladimorivch Satanovsky (1993)

Design and Implementation of Automated machine translator for Heiroglyphics

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: M. Anthony Kapolka


Yutong Shang (2016)

Printing 3D Mathematical Surfaces for a Multivariable Calculus Course

The Dana assistant will learn how to create mathematical surfaces using a 3D printer, will print a collection of such objects for use in MATH 171 (Multivariable Calculus), and will produce a detailed set of instructions for how to make more.

Term Funded:fall 2013
Professor: David Richeson


Yutong Shang (2016)

Developing a Mobile/Networked Database for the College Farm

Developing a Mobile/Networked Database for the College Farm

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Tim Wahls


Deborah Velat Smith (1990)

Development of a Cold Plasma Source and Diagnostics to Study Plasma

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1989
Professor: Guy Vandegrift


John William Snyder (1993)

Implementation of a parallel queueing simulation model

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: Nancy Baxter-Hastings


Natalie Mary Stanley (2013)

Bioinformatic Analysis of Gene Promoters for Expression Pattern Prediction

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Jeffrey Forrester


Russell Charles Toris (2011)

Interfacing dLife to Player/Stage/Gazebo Open-Source Robot Simulators

The dlife software package is a Java library that provides support for teaching and research in the areas of artificial life, artificial intelligence and robotics. Player/Stage/Gazebo is a collection of three closely related open-source projects that form one of today's most widely used robotic simulation platforms. The proposed project extends dLife to control 2 and 3 dimensional robot simulations running in Player/Stage/Gazebo. Support for control of simulated robots is an essential addition to dLife. It will allow rapid prototyping and experimentation with robot control algorithms. It will put in place a necessary prerequisite for the project I plan to propose for my anticipated 2010-2011 sabbatical. It will broaden the appeal of dLife to students and researchers who do not have access to physical robots, or have an insufficient number of physical robots for a particular course or experiment.

Term Funded:Year 2010
Professor: Grant Braught


Russell Charles Toris (2011)

Interfacing dLife to Player/Stage/Gazebo Open-Source Robot Simulators

The dlife software package is a Java library that provides support for teaching and research in the areas of artificial life, artificial intelligence and robotics. Player/Stage/Gazebo is a collection of three closely related open-source projects that form one of today's most widely used robotic simulation platforms. The proposed project extends dLife to control 2 and 3 dimensional robot simulations running in Player/Stage/Gazebo. Support for control of simulated robots is an essential addition to dLife. It will allow rapid prototyping and experimentation with robot control algorithms. It will put in place a necessary prerequisite for the project I plan to propose for my anticipated 2010-2011 sabbatical. It will broaden the appeal of dLife to students and researchers who do not have access to physical robots, or have an insufficient number of physical robots for a particular course or experiment.

Term Funded:Year 2009
Professor: Grant Braught


Russell Charles Toris (2011)

Studying Self-Adaptive Mutation Rates in a Competitive Co-Evolutionary Game of Robot Tag

In the proposed project Russell Toris ('11) and I will investigate the evolution of self-adaptive mutation rates using the game of robot tag as a model for a competitive co-evolutionary (e.g. predator/prey) system. We outline a series of three experiments that determine if self-adaptive mutation rates allow predators or prey to out compete their opponent. We also propose a fourth experiment that will shed light on the evolutionary dynamics of self-adaptive mutation rates in competitive co-evolutionary systems. This project builds heavily on the work Russel has done as a Dana Research Assistant for me this academic year, and will form the basis of his honors research project next academic year. I anticipate that Russell will present our summer work at the student poster session of the 2010 Computing Sciences in Colleges (CCSC) Eastern Regional Conference, and the continuation of this work, as his honors project, at a similar session at the 2011 CCSC Northeastern Regional Conference. Finally, I believe that this project has the potential to also result in a co-authored refereed conference paper.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Grant Braught


Dale Wesley Usner (1992)

A Bayesian Non-parametric Approach to Tournament Ranking and Design

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1990
Professor: Allan Rossman


Andrew Joseph Wayne (1993)

Parallel Parsing Techniques

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1991
Professor: Ann Hill


Karen Oster Weber (2001)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Allan Rossman


Matthew Robert Whitehead (1992)

Parallel Graph Theory Algorithms

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1991
Professor: Nancy Baxter-Hastings


Danfei Xu (2015)

Developing a Technique for Characterizing Pain-Related SEP Waveforms

This proposal involves the analysis of certain brain signals, known as somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs), in order to automatically determine the presence of pain, and the extent of any pain. Two promising techniques have already been developed using pilot data from earlier experiments, but this proposal seeks to develop additional, potentially more reliable, methods. Numerical experiments on the data, performed by the Dana Research Assistant, will employ techniques from both statistics and machine learning. Specifically, the initial approach will involve a applying a statistical tool known as a "filter bank" to each SEP waveform, and examining the results to determine whether thresholding or other simple feature extraction can reliably classify the pain signals. Additional experiments can employ other tools, such as artificial neural networks, support vector machines, decision trees, and the like to perform more sophisticated classification if necessary.

Term Funded:Year 2011-2012
Professor: John MacCormick


Xiang Yao (2015)

Developing a Mobile/Networked Database for the College Farm

Developing a Mobile/Networked Database for the College Farm

Term Funded:spring 2013
Professor: Tim Wahls


Ryan Eric Zeigler (2008)

A New Approach for Speeding the Evolution of Robot Controllers

In the proposed project, Ryan Zeigler '08 and I will investigate the effectiveness of a novel approach to evolving controllers for mobile robots. This approach is based on using a neural network that learns the differences between simulated and physical robots. The information learned by the neural network is used by the system to better evaluate the "fitness" of solutions evolving in simulation. We propose to spend eight weeks during the summer of 2007 implementing, testing and evaluating this approach. At the conclusion of the project we will have collected data useful in evaluating the effectiveness of the approach. This data along with a discusion of the approach, our experiments and the results will become the basis for a scholarly paper. I anticipate that Ryan and I will co-author this paper and submit it for publication by the end of the 2007-2008 academic year.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Grant Braught


Middle East Studies

Christopher William Barber (2014)

U.S. Public Diplomacy in the Arab World

"Public Diplomacy in the Arab World" is a textbook that provides advanced students of Arabic with an introduction to the theory and practice of public diplomacy, while enhancing their Arabic language proficiency and real-life communication skills. The research fills a void in the instruction of Arabic by focusing on the specialized vocabulary of the diplomat while exploring critical social, political, security, economic and environemtnal issues in the region. To appreciate the challenges of conducting public diplomacy in the Arab world, research will focus on an examination of actual programs in four key countries: Egypt, Morocco, Jordan and the UAE, with an overview of bilateral relations. The Dana Research Assistant for this project will conduct internet based research, literature review, and site visits (he will accompany me on 2-3 visits to Washington to interview/record interviews with practitioners and grantees). He will edit recordings, index them, and provide summary.

Term Funded:Fall 2013
Professor: Magda Siekert


Giancarlo Daniel Duffy (2014)

Designing a curriculum for an Arabic conversation course and text book

I would like to design a curriculum for Arabic conversation and I want to do a text book for the advanced students studying Arabic. My focus in the text book will be explaining different strategies in teaching Arabic conversation, make supplement handouts, and power points for each lesson. I would like to put the power points and the recorded material on a CD that will be used with the text book. I need two senior students to work with me to help me to collect the material I need, I will assign them various duties in order to accomplish the task in spring. Their duties will include gathering information about each lesson, design power points, and find a media and pictures related to different topics. I need some funding about 300$ to buy some CDs, pictures, and books. I would like to start this project during the spring semester. If I get approved there will be a ready task for each student in this project.

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: May George


Sara Jayne Hatch (2012)

Designing a curriculum for an Arabic conversation course and text book

I would like to design a curriculum for Arabic conversation and I want to do a text book for the advanced students studying Arabic. My focus in the text book will be explaining different strategies in teaching Arabic conversation, make supplement handouts, and power points for each lesson. I would like to put the power points and the recorded material on a CD that will be used with the text book. I need two senior students to work with me to help me to collect the material I need, I will assign them various duties in order to accomplish the task in spring. Their duties will include gathering information about each lesson, design power points, and find a media and pictures related to different topics. I need some funding about 300$ to buy some CDs, pictures, and books. I would like to start this project during the spring semester. If I get approved there will be a ready task for each student in this project.

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: May George


Music

Megan Elizabeth Conlon (2009)

Philadelphia Orchestra's "Getting to Know You" Series: Arnold Schoenberg's Kammersymphonie No. 1

Each year, the Philadelphia Philharmonic Orchestra (PPO) a sponsors a series of chamber music concerts as part of their "Getting to Know You" series, a program that encourages subscribers to expand their musical horizons through engagement with a shorter work by a twentieth-century composer. The concert itself is designed as a lecture recital in which a prominent scholar serves as the audience's "host" for the evening, providing an academic presentation and lecture on the piece, interviewing the conductor and musicians prior to the performance, and producing a series of multi-media materials that clarify the complex musical structure to a lay audience. This year, the PPO has invited me to host Arnold Schoenberg's Kammersymphonie No. 1 to be conducted by Christopher Eschenbach on January 21, 2009. My role is to write the script, create multimedia materials, provide the academic lecture, and host an interview with Maestro Eschenbach.

Term Funded:Fall 2008
Professor: Amy Wlodarski


Jamie L Leidwinger (2015)

The Isomer Project: Ongoing Research in Computational Creativity

The Isomer Project is a suite of software tools that is the culmination of a decade of independent research and commercial development. The scope of the proposed student-faculty collaboration is to validate the boundaries of the Isomer software's capacity for musical analysis, model representation and algorithmic transformation using advanced machine-learning techniques. The student-faculty team will work on the Isomer Project's (http://composingthefuture.com/) ongoing research in computational creativity at Drexel University's ExCITe Center (http://drexel.edu/excite/) in Philadelphia in summer 2013.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Greg Wilder


Megan Elizabeth Powers (2002)

Franco-Flemish Music in Medicean Florence: Sources, Practices and Pattersn of Dissemination

This study will focus on the influx of northern polyphonic (and primarily secular chanson) repertory into Florence during the second half of the fifteenth century, when Florence became one of the primary Italian markets for this music. However, the diffuse patronage environment of Florence was unique among Italian centers that fostered northern composers and sources both per se(as 'international') and in relation to the Italian courts, this study will be the first to view the significant group of Florentine chansonniers as the artistic products and cultural manifestations of a particular time and place. To what extent does this pervasive and international repertoire assume a local character in a particular environment? What, then, is Florentine about the layout, contents, concordances, unica, and styles in these sources, and, conversely, to what extent did this music penetrate local venues and influence local styles and practices? Megan Powers, the student researcher in this project, will prepare a research paper on a specific aspect of this topic (a particular composer, source, or related group of compositions) that will be read in a Music Department seminar, and submitted for presentation at a chapter meeting of the American Musicological Society or comparable venue. In preparation for this, she will read and listen broadly in the secondary literature in preparation for her more specialized work in which she will be given ample opportunity to use the language skills refined during her current year in Toulouse.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Blake Wilson


Sara Lantry Yester (2009)

Reconsidering the Arts in the German Democratic Republic: An Interdisciplinary Conference

This conference seeks to explore new avenues in East German research with specific attention to the role of the visual and performing arts. It aims to move the discourse surrounding art in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) away from traditional paradigms and rhetoric of the Cold War. In the case of the GDR, art dialogued with governmental systems, political ideologies, propaganda, minority rights, national mythology, memory, and social parameters such as gender, religion, race, and class. The conference will explore some of these points of intersection in a series of scholarly presentations by established experts in the field, a literary reading by a former GDR author, and a musical performance consisting of works by GDR composers.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Amy Wlodarski


Sara Lantry Yester (2009)

Reconsidering the Arts in the German Democratic Republic: An Interdisciplinary Conference (October 25-27, 2007)

This conference seeks to explore new avenues in East German research with specific attention to the role of the visual and performing arts. It aims to move the discourse surrounding art in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) away from traditional paradigms and rhetoric of the Cold War. In the case of the GDR, art dialogued with governmental systems, political ideologies, propaganda, minority rights, national mythology, memory, and social parameters such as gender, religion, race, and class. The conference will explore some of these points of intersection in a series of scholarly presentations by established experts in the field, a literary reading by a former GDR author, and a musical performance consisting of works by GDR composers.

Term Funded:Fall 2007
Professor: Amy Wlodarski


Neuroscience

Kelsey Marie Barclay (2013)

Human Electrophysiology Lab

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Jonathan Page


Marleni Fabiola Milla (2011)

Developing a Methodology to Electronically Measure Pain

Pain is a subjective experience that is difficult to quantify. Currently, there are no objective methods for detecting pain or rating its intensity. This makes it difficult for health professionals to diagnose and treat pain, often leading to the under-treatment or over-treatment of symptoms. We are developing an objective way to electronically measure pain. Pilot data collected from human subjects show our techniques are promising. The purpose of this funding application is to develop a method for testing our techniques on an animal model of joint soreness. We plan to induce joint soreness in the front knee of rats, electrically stimulate the sore knee and the (opposite) non-sore knee, and record brain potentials to this stimulation using the electroencephalograph (EEG). Analyses of brain responses should reveal systematic differences in EEG signals from the sore knees versus the non-sore knees, thus detecting the presence of pain in a non-verbal being.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Jonathan Page


Gina Marie Norato (2012)

Developing a Methodology to Electronically Measure Pain

Pain is a subjective experience that is difficult to quantify. Currently, there are no objective methods for detecting pain or rating its intensity. This makes it difficult for health professionals to diagnose and treat pain, often leading to the under-treatment or over-treatment of symptoms. We are developing an objective way to electronically measure pain. Pilot data collected from human subjects show our techniques are promising. The purpose of this funding application is to develop a method for testing our techniques on an animal model of joint soreness. We plan to induce joint soreness in the front knee of rats, electrically stimulate the sore knee and the (opposite) non-sore knee, and record brain potentials to this stimulation using the electroencephalograph (EEG). Analyses of brain responses should reveal systematic differences in EEG signals from the sore knees versus the non-sore knees, thus detecting the presence of pain in a non-verbal being.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Teresa Barber


Philosophy

Tatyana M Matveeva (2008)

Probing Folk Intuitions: The Trolley Problem Revisited

During the past few years there has been gathering interest among both philosophers and scientists in trying to understand the sources (and limitations) of human moral cognition. One of the central problems in moral psychology is determining what moral intuitions are and how they are produced. The goal of my project this summer will be to shed light on this problem by investigating (a) whether people's moral intuitions are shaped partly by the way the scenarios they read are presented, and (b) what factors affect people's intuitions about self-defense. Along the way, we will run a series of studies, analyze the data, write a co-authored paper, and present both the data and a rough draft of the paper to members of the Harvard psychology department.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Thomas Nadelhoffer


Tatyana M Matveeva (2008)

Multiple Tasks and Titles

Ms. Matveeva would help me with four distinct projects: (a) I am editing a moral psychology anthology for Blackwell Press, (b) I am working on a book manuscript entitled The Uses (and Abuses) of Intuitions in Philosophy-which will be submitted to Oxford University Press, (c) I am organizing the third installation of the On-line Philosophy Conference, and (d) I am conducting a series of studies on moral cognition (which will be a continuation of the research Ms. Matveeva and I conducted this summer).

Term Funded:Year 2008
Professor: Thomas Nadelhoffer


Molly Kathleen Mullane (2015)

Animal Cognition

Many non-human animals exhibit sophisticated cognitive skills. Are these merely skills for coping with localized challenges, or are they evidence of a general ability to think about how the world is? Philosophers use the term "intentionality" for this ability to think about how the world is. What intentionality requires is a long-standing question in philosophy, cognitive science, and ethology. On the one hand, it seems to involve more than merely responding consistently to stimuli-even plants do that. On the other hand, it seems to involve less than language. But then what does it require, exactly? Those questions are at the heart of our research. Specifically, we aim to find cases of animal cognition that are maximally instructive for assessing theories of intentionality. These cases will be presented in an introductory book on intentionality that Maher is working on. We plan to study empirical work on animal cognition, both data and theory. Molly will also research recent philosophical work on intentionality and animal minds.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Chauncey Maher


Physical Education

Kelly Hummer Facciola (1995)

Disordered Eating Behaviors in Female Athletes

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1994
Professor: Judith Yorio


Physics

Michael A Vecchio (2014)

NSF 085670 STEP Program at Dickinson College

Through this program, Dickinson intends to recruit and matriculate a "science posse" cohort in each of three years beginning in the fall of 2009. The science posse program will have three major components: 1) a four-week summer pre-matriculation program in which students will participate in lab research and a series of enrichment workshops in chemistry and mathematics; 2) a second eight-week summer of research with Dickinson faculty members using our successful model of student/faculty research; and 3) a capstone eight-week summer research experience at off-campus laboratories in major research universities. The program will provide a strong mentoring experience for underrepresented students to support their pursuit of a science major. The successful implementation of this plan will result in the establishment of a cohort of science major role models for future students among our underrepresented minority groups. Results of the program will be disseminated widely within the broader scientific education community so that they may serve as a model for other institutions.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor:


Physics & Astronomy

Mara Eugenia Roze Anderson (2010)

Nonlinear Localization and Pattern Formation in Two-Dimensional Electrical Lattices

We propose to study the nonlinear dynamics of two-dimensional electrical lattices. In particular, we will experimentally search for the existence of nonlinear intrinsic localized modes (ILMs) can exist in two dimensions. Our previous work (see detailed proposal and publications) has demonstrated that ILMs can be generated and sustained in a one-dimensional electrical lattice. The question we would like to address is how the addition of an extra dimension affects these results. In continuous systems, it destroys localized modes (called solitons), but theoretical predictions indicate that the discreteness of the lattice would stabilize the localized modes in higher dimensional lattices. We propose to continue our previous research by first building a 2D version of the electrical lattice, and then studying the nonlinear pattern formation that results from uniformly driving this system. We will study whether ILMs can result from the pattern formation at longer times under various driving conditions.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Lars English


Daniel Harrison Barnak (2010)

Generation of lattice solitons via modulational instability in discrete electronic transmission lines

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Lars English


Michael Christian Bartosiewicz (2000)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Year 2000
Professor: Scott Franklin


Ritoban Basu Thakur (2008)

Exploring Pattern Formation in Two Nonlinear Lattices

This application is for a two-part research project centered around two experimental systems: coupled mechanical pendula and coupled electrical oscillators. Though physically very different, these two systems share some strong underlying similarities. They both consist of individual nonlinear oscillators linked together and can both exhibit the spontaneous formation of patterns. In the context of the coupled pendula, pattern formation takes the form of synchronization of the pendula;s motion, even in the presence of frequency mismatches. We have already demonstrated this remarkable effect and would like to investigate the role of friction in determining the characteristics of the synchronized state. In the context of the electrical system, pattern formation refers to a spatial (not temporal) pattern consisting of so-called solitons. The emergence of solitons was experimentally verified last summer; this summer we would like to study in greater detail how these highly nonlinear solutions form and      what role feedback may play.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Lars English


Ritoban Basu Thakur (2008)

Generation of lattice solitons via modulational instability in discrete electronic transmission lines

In close analogy to nonlinear microwave studies on magnetic crystals, we propose to investigate the generation of lattice solitons or intrinsic localized modes (ILMs) in the macroscopic lattice of an electronic transmission line consisting of capacitive and inductive elements periodically arranged. Such systems have been demonstrated to support traveling solitons when pulses are launched at its ends. In this study, however, we would like to focus on generating stationary localized modes as a result of driving the uniform plane-wave mode in this lattice into a nonlinear regime where it becomes unstable against modulations. Further, we would like to study the spatial signature of these lattice solitons as well as of the preceding modulational instability as a function of the position of the uniform mode relative to the rest of the plane-wave dispersion curve. We plan on controlling this parameter via electronic feedback acting on the uniform mode. In the magnetic context this parameter was numerically shown to be significant in determining the type of instability. In our system this question can be investigated experimentally and the pattern formation process observed directly.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Lars English


Ritoban Basu Thakur (2008)

Generation of lattice solitons via modulational instability in discrete electronic transmission lines

In close analogy to nonlinear microwave studies on magnetic crystals, we propose to investigate the generation of lattice solitons or intrinsic localized modes (ILMs) in the macroscopic lattice of an electronic transmission line consisting of capacitive and inductive elements periodically arranged. Such systems have been demonstrated to support traveling solitons when pulses are launched at its ends. In this study, however, we would like to focus on generating stationary localized modes as a result of driving the uniform plane-wave mode in this lattice into a nonlinear regime where it becomes unstable against modulations. Further, we would like to study the spatial signature of these lattice solitons as well as of the preceding modulational instability as a function of the position of the uniform mode relative to the rest of the plane-wave dispersion curve. We plan on controlling this parameter via electronic feedback acting on the uniform mode. In the magnetic context this parameter was numerically shown to be significant in determining the type of instability. In our system this question can be investigated experimentally and the pattern formation process observed directly.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Lars English


Zachary Lee Carson (2010)

Biological Imaging with Ultrafast Lasers

This proposal aims to develop a multiphoton microscope for biological imaging using ultrafast lasers. Confocal microscopy using fluorescent markers is a well-established method for examining biological specimens that allows scientists to image live cells at the single-cell level. More recently, the extension of this technique to multiphoton microscopy has addressed many of the limitations of traditional confocal microscopy. Advances in short-pulse laser technology have enabled this development, and the broad spectral bandwidth of femtosecond lasers opens the door for controlled excitation during the imaging process. Here we propose to construct a multiphoton imaging apparatus for examining biological specimens. The work builds on existing infrastructure and offers ample opportunity for student involvement.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Brett Pearson


Raheem Ahmed Chowdhury (2015)

NSF 085670 STEP Program at Dickinson College

Through this program, Dickinson intends to recruit and matriculate a "science posse" cohort in each of three years beginning in the fall of 2009. The science posse program will have three major components: 1) a four-week summer pre-matriculation program in which students will participate in lab research and a series of enrichment workshops in chemistry and mathematics; 2) a second eight-week summer of research with Dickinson faculty members using our successful model of student/faculty research; and 3) a capstone eight-week summer research experience at off-campus laboratories in major research universities. The program will provide a strong mentoring experience for underrepresented students to support their pursuit of a science major. The successful implementation of this plan will result in the establishment of a cohort of science major role models for future students among our underrepresented minority groups. Results of the program will be disseminated widely within the broader scientific education community so that they may serve as a model for other institutions.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Hans Pfister


Francis Joseph Cressotti (2010)

Extending the Timeline for Angular Momentum Evolution: What Role Do Disks Play in Regulating Stellar Rotation at 5 Myr?

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Catrina Hamilton-Drager


Sean Michael Diamond (2008)

Design and Construction of a Sun-Tracking Solar Heat Exchanger

The solar energy device converts solar energy directly into thermal energy. The four and one quarter square meter large mirror surface simply intercepts the solar radiation and converts it into thermal energy. The amount of solar energy incident on the mirror's surface would have arrived at the surface of the earth regardless of the presence of the mirror. The device therefore does not add more thermal energy to the surface of the earth. The device only concentrates the thermal energy and stores it temporarily in the warm water reservoir of a residence.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Hans Pfister


Linnea Nicole Engstrom (2005)

Feedback and Pattern Formation in Electrical Transmission Lines

In recent years there has been an explosion of interest in the study of intrinsic localized modes (ILMs) [1], which are the analogs of solitons in discrete media. Much numerical and theoretical research has focused on nonlinear localization of energy in nano-scale atomic lattices, where experimental observation is necessarily indirect. We will extend existing experimental studies [2] on ILM formation in discrete, nonlinear electrical transmission lines. In particular, we investigate the modulational instability of standing waves and its dependence on feedback in the circuit. The important role of feedback in pattern formation was already reported in the context of spin lattices [3]. This study will elucidates the role of feedback in a nonlinear macroscopic system. [1] D.K. Campball, S. Flach, Y.S. Kivshar, Physics Today, January 2004; [2] J.M. Bilbault, P. Marquie, B. Michaux Phys. Rev. E 51 (1995), 817; [3] L.Q. English, M. Sato, A.J. Sievers, Phys. Rev. B 67 (2003), 024403

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Lars English


Nickolas Evagelou (2008)

Development of Experiments for a Project Centered Course in Electronics based on the Design and Construction of a Sustainable Solar Powered LED Lighting System

The development of Solar powered LED based lighting systems promise to provide a much needed solution to the lighting dilemma faced by communities in rural parts of the developing world. This summer I plan to work with a student to investigate the operating characteristics of solar powered LED lighting systems and to develop activities designed to introduce the idea of appropriate technology into the Dickinson electronics curriculum using these lighting systems as a central example.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Kerry Browne


Nickolas Evagelou (2008)

Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) Research. Hansen Technologies

A project for academic research and prototype development in support of a high-technology biotechnology business in Carlisle, Cumberland County, PA. This proposal requested $600,000 for the detection of CWD, sheep scrapie, and bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) in blood or other bodily fluids using an array biosensor capable of multianalyte, multiplexed sample analysis of 15 or greater simultaneous fluorescent sandwich assays. The funding will support the development of a live animal fluid test for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie and BSE, as well as the evaluation of commercially available bio-markers for the array biosensor to determine their sensitivity and specificity for chronic wasting disease and sheep scrapie. The project will be undertaken at Dickinson College, Carlisle, PA - site of Hanson Technologies, Inc. offices, and will be supported by faculty and student researchers. William P. Hanson, Ph.D., President & CEO, Hanson Technologies, Inc., will serve as Project Director.

Term Funded:Spring 2007
Professor: David Kushner


Karen Lewis Hirsch (1992)

Observations of 13.5 micron rotation-vibration lines of SiS in IRC 10216

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1990
Professor: Robert Boyle


Karen Lewis Hirsch (1992)

High Resolution Astronomical Infrared Spectroscopy

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1989
Professor: Robert Boyle


Evan Cowling Howlett (2007)

Exploring Pattern Formation in Two Nonlinear Lattices

This application is for a two-part research project centered around two experimental systems: coupled mechanical pendula and coupled electrical oscillators. Though physically very different, these two systems share some strong underlying similarities. They both consist of individual nonlinear oscillators linked together and can both exhibit the spontaneous formation of patterns. In the context of the coupled pendula, pattern formation takes the form of synchronization of the pendula;s motion, even in the presence of frequency mismatches. We have already demonstrated this remarkable effect and would like to investigate the role of friction in determining the characteristics of the synchronized state. In the context of the electrical system, pattern formation refers to a spatial (not temporal) pattern consisting of so-called solitons. The emergence of solitons was experimentally verified last summer; this summer we would like to study in greater detail how these highly nonlinear solutions form and      what role feedback may play.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Lars English


Maya Faye Keller (1999)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Year 2000
Professor: John Luetzelschwab


Benjamin Joseph Kimock (2015)

Analysis of Observations of KH 15D Obtained with the Chandra X-Ray Observatory

In the 2011/2012 observing season, Star B of the pre-main sequence eclipsing binary system, KH 15D, emerged unexpectedly, from the bottom of the occulting circumbinary ring. We have, in this incredible pre-main sequence eclipsing binary system, an exciting opportunity to explore in great detail, a circumbinary disk that has formed large grains that have settled toward the mid-plane, which is considered the first step toward planet formation. Serendipitously, the Chandra X-ray Observatory was conducting a survey of the young cluster NGC 2264, the cluster in which KH 15D resides, during December 2011. Although we did not obtain these data, they are now publically available through the Chandra Data Archive. It is our plan to extract these data from the Archive and analyze the X-ray flux for Star B in this system. We can then compare our results to those found for Star A back in 2005. These two stars are of similar spectral types (temperatures), so it should be interesting and informative to see if they differ greatly in their X-ray flux. If so, this could be an indication of interacting magnetospheres, which would support the idea of pulsed accretion during closest approach. Additionally, should this analysis lead to a detection of X-ray activity, it will lay the foundation for an additional observing proposal to be submitted to the XMM-Newton X-ray space telescope in October 2013.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Catrina Hamilton-Drager


Benjamin Joseph Kimock (2015)

Rotation Rates and Radii of Young Stars in the Cluster NGC 2362

Rotation Rates and Radii of Young Stars in the Cluster NGC 2362

Term Funded:Fall 2013
Professor: Catrina Hamilton-Drager


Joshua Taylor Margolis (2013)

Low-cost Spatial Light Modulator for Fourier Domain Pulse Shaping

Optical pulse shapers, which selectively modify both the amplitude and phase properties of light sources, are widely used in a variety of scientific research areas including optical communications, precision measurements, and quantum chemistry. The primary method relies on Fourier-domain pulse shaping, where the frequency components of the light source are spatially resolved so that a patterned mask can individually address each color. Liquid-crystal displays (LCD) are the most common mask element, and the recent development of flat-screen monitors and projectors using LCD technology has substantially reduced the cost of such devices. In this project we plan to develop a programmable mask using a commercial LCD for use in a departmental Fourier optics experiment.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Brett Pearson


James Michael Martin (2008)

Determining Rotation Periods of the Stars in NGC 2362: Extending the Timeline for Angular Momentum Evolution

We propose to determine rotation periods for stars in the young cluster NGC 2362 (age ~ 5 million years old) that are believed to have masses between 0.25 and 2 solar masses. Bimodal period distributions for stars in this mass range have been observed in clusters of ages ~1 and ~3 Myr. Theory suggests that the stars in the "slow rotator" group are, or have recently been, magnetically locked to their circumstellar disks, which thereby regulates the rate at which a star can spin, shunting away angular momentum in the process. The distributions seen in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC, t ~ 1 Myr) and NGC 2264 (t ~ 3 Myr) are similar however, the slow rotator peak observed for NGC 2264 is shifted to faster periods. This would indicate that a star has been freed from its disk (most likely due to the condensation of gas and dust particles into planetesimals), it is able to spin up, conserving angular momentum. We wish to determine wheter or not this trend continues for even older clusters. At ~5 Myr, NGC 2362 is an ideal cluster in which we can test this hypothesis further.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Catrina Hamilton-Drager


Kelly Lynn McFarland (1998)

X-Ray and Optical Properties of X Persei

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: Windsor Morgan


Anubhav Mohan (2011)

Rotational Velocities, Radii, and Spectral types of Pre-main Sequence Stars in NGC 2362

I recently obtained high-resolution spectra for a large number of pre-main sequence (PMS) stars in the young cluster NGC 2362 in order to measure their projected rotational velocity, or v sin(i) value. The sample includes ~ 100 stars for which accurate rotation periods are known from photometric monitoring. By combining rotation periods with projected velocities for this large sample of stars, we will be able to apply statistical arguments to arrive at estimates for the mean radii of the stars in NGC 2362. Stellar radii and rotational velocities are crucial fundamental parameters, which constrain theoretical models describing PMS evolution, as well as magnetospheric accretion. As a part of the cross-correlation process used to measure the v sin(i), we plan to measure the target stars' radial velocities. These radial velocity measurements, to my knowledge, will be the first for the PMS stars in NGC 2362. Low-resolution spectra of these targets were also obtained for the purpose of spectral classification. This will provide an independent assessment of each star's radius by traditional means using luminosity and effective temperature.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Catrina Hamilton-Drager


Brian William Motter (1994)

Investigation of the Merging Mechanisms of Filamentary Plasma Currrents

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Hans Pfister


Matthew Jude Murray (2011)

Pulse Shaping for Enhanced Discrimination in Multiphoton Microscopy

Fluorescence microscopy, where optical light is used to image biological systems, has led to numerous advances in our understanding of cellular function. For example, imaging fluorescent proteins or other intrinsic fluorophores with optical microscopes provides detailed information about cellular processes in real time. Despite these advances, some restrictions remain, including a limited capacity to rapidly acquire images of multiple fluorophores when there is little or no distinction between their single-photon absorption or emission spectra. In this proposal, we outline an approach to substantially improve the ability to generate such multiplexed images of competing fluorophores. The approach relies on selective multiphoton excitation of the fluorophores using shaped laser pulses, thereby removing the need to spectrally separate the excitation or detection processes. The proposed method is quite general, and therefore not tied to a specific set of fluorophores.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Brett Pearson


Kristen Ann Recine (2011)

Extending the Timeline for Angular Momentum Evolution: What Role Do Disks Play in Regulating Stellar Rotation at 5 Myr?

This summer I had the wonderful opportunity to work with Professor Catrina Hamilton- Drager on a subject that I have been in love with for as long as I can remember: astronomy. Professor Drager took on myself and another student to continue the work of many past advisees, which was the study of the open cluster NGC 2362. This internship has been filled with highly valuable experience and an immense amount of learning, for which I am very grateful. We started off on the first of June, jumping right into our work. For me, everything in the internship was new; I had never used UNIX before, nor did I know very much about star formation in general and specifically the kind of stars we were to study. Professor Drager taught us about a type of star called T Tauri, on which we would be focusing. In addition, we had to learn IRAF (Image Reduction and Analysis Facility) and IDL (Interactive Data Language), the two main programs we would use to complete our work. I was amazed by how much knowledge was required, and though I was slightly intimidated I was very excited to start working. We started off reducing the data that had been collected from an observing run in 2006, which meant subtracting out noise from the atmosphere and the equipment. We also started reading up on our cluster, studies that had been done on stars like those in our cluster, and charge coupled devices (CCD) or the device used to take pictures. We then took our pictures and identified stars within the cluster, beginning to find stars whose light output did not vary over time. Since our end goal was to find stars with a varying light output, we would use these static stars for comparisons. We went through lists of thousands of stars, editing programs many times to find our periodic stars. As it turned%2

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Catrina Hamilton-Drager


Kristen Ann Recine (2011)

Modeling the Evolution of the Cataclysmic Variable System V723 Cas

Kristen Recine will spend eight weeks this summer completing a project that we have been working on together throughout this academic year, half of which while I have been on sabbatical. Kristen has nearly completed her Honors Thesis in physics at the time of this submission, and the outcome of our collaborative research is extremely exciting and publication-worthy. We require an additional eight weeks to complete the reduction and analysis of photometric data obtained with the Michael L. Britton 24-inch telescope located here on the campus of Dickinson College and to write the paper for submission to the Astronomical Journal. Kristen has already spent an entire academic year reducing six years' worth of data obtained at the National Undergraduate Research Observatory (NURO) located in Flagstaff, AZ. The Britton data are critical to our final analysis of the system due to the timing of those observations.

Term Funded: 2011
Professor: Katrina Hamilton-Drager


Joel Todd Schwendemann (1996)

Research Corp-Pfister 1995

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1995
Professor: Hans Pfister


Ryan Alan Stearrett (2007)

Engineering plane-wave dispersion curves to study different nonlinear instabilities leading to pattern formation in electrical transmission lines

We propose to study wave propagation in electrical transmission lines consisting of a number of discrete circuit elements (capacitors and inductors) in sequence. It is known that sinusoidal voltage waves (plane waves) can propagate down this electronic lattice. If nonlinear capacitors (reversed-biased diodes) are used, spatially localized "solitons" can exist in addition to the plane waves, which have the unusual property of remaining sharply focused as they travel (no dispersion). In this proposed study, we would focus on engineering the plane-wave spectrum (dispersion curve) via a feedback mechanism and to characterize the resulting effect on the nonlinear instabilities of plane waves. If the analogy to magnetic spin-lattices holds true in this system, we should see a suppression of the typical modulational instability under certain feedback conditions.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Lars English


Jeremy Dane Wachtel (1993)

Interaction of a Plasma Current with a Stationary Axial Current

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: Hans Pfister


Andrew Joseph Wayne (1993)

Parallel Parsing Techniques

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1990
Professor: Ann Hill


Stephanie Ellis Williams (1992)

Adsorption of 222 Rn by open-faced and barrier charcoal canisters in the presence of different temperatures and humidities

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1991
Professor: John Luetzelschwab


Political Science

()

The Right to Die: A Comparative Analysis

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1991
Professor: Jim Hoefler


()

When Death Comes Knocking: Deathright

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Jim Hoefler


Sidney Jayne Bashago Wills (2002)

Finding the "where" and "how": Geography and Implementation in Pennsylvania Welfare Reform

One of the reforms of welfare (in the 1996 legislation) was the transfer of primary authority for welfare from the national government to state goverments. During the period of this transfer, welfare caseloads declined dramatically (51%). We propose to explore the causes of this decline in Pennsylvania. This project represents the continuation of a project begun last summer (as part of student faculty research). We will gather county-level data and conduct surveys in order to test a series of hypotheses about the role of implementation and geography (particularly urbanity) on welfare caseload decline. In particular, we will use the quantitative model to assess variation by county in caseload decline, and we will use a more qualitative model to explore the effects of CAO culture on caseload decline.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: James Sloat


Lingwei Cheng (2014)

Chinese Veterans Protests in the Reform Period (2000-2012)

I wish to hire Ms. Lingwei Cheng as my RA for the fall semester. During this time Lingwei will plumb the numerous online sources that have become available in Chinese in the last decade or so, mainly on social networking websites, including blogs, local government websites, court records, microblogs, newletters and pamplets, with regard to the political, economic, and social factors that have resulted in veterans protests. Why, in contrast to most the world, do veterans protest in China? Many veterans in China, like others with various grievances, have taken to the internet to connect with others and voice their discontent, sometimes directly and sometimes more obliquely. This source can be a valuable addition to more traditional ones, such as newspapers, journals, and scholarly analysis producted in the PRC about veterans' problems (little of this deals with protest, which is still sensitive). In addition to locating these materials, Lingwei will also provide me with a first-cut at translation of the text. LIngwei and I will communicate regularly about the research, either through Skype, email or telephone. Lingwei is the perfect person for this job. She is very well versed in Chinese media sources (she wrote a paper on the media's role in litigation for my class and later presented it at the regional meeting of the Association for Asian Studies), and she is a Political Science major who is very familiar with my previous work. I am applying for a Dana largely because the US Army War College, which is funding my sabbatical, wants me to produce scholarship that is of interest to the US military, and this necessitated a change from my initial sabbatial project which did not have a military focus.

Term Funded:fall 2012
Professor: Neil Diamant


Daniel William DeArment (1993)

Curriculum Revision and Textbook Development for Constitutional Law Courses

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: Harry Pohlman


Daniel William DeArment (1993)

Preparation and Editing of Constitutional Law Texts

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Harry Pohlman


Layne Alison Feldman (2010)

Research on the Congressional Women's Caucus

The goal of this project is to compile information on the voting behavior of the female members of Congress, with particular attention to their behavior in civil rights policy, defined broadly to include racial minorities, women and LGBT communities. In particular, I hope to use this research to add depth and breadth to my ongoing research on the voting behavior of the Congressional Tri-Caucus, which includes the Congressional Black, Hispanic, and Asian Pacific American Caucuses. I already have statistical information indicating that female members tend to be more liberal than their male counterparts when it comes to specific types of legislation, but I would like to flesh that out to understand what the implications are for groups that are often marginalized in the political arena.

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: Tyson Vanessa


Pamela Fukuda (1993)

When Death Comes Knocking: The Right to Die on the Edge of Eternity

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: Jim Hoefler


Caitlin Campbell Goss (2008)

Completing book manuscript (Like Donkeys Killed After Grinding the Wheat: Veterans, Military Families and the Politics of Martial Citizenship and Patriotism in China )for final submission to the press

During the academic year 2006-7 I completed a draft of my book manuscript, the main goal of my sabbatical leave. Comprised of seven substantial chapters in addition to an introduction and conclusion, the manuscript will be shipped to the publisher on August 15, 2007. I would like to hire a Dana Assistant for 8 hours a week for 26 weeks to improve, polish, and fill in some gaps in the text. These tasks will include editing, proofreading, map-making, preparing a Chinese glossary, bibliography and searching for new sources on veterans in three other Asian counties, among others. All of these tasks will benefit the student in terms of substance (they will learn a lot about China and improve their Chinese), and learning about the research and editing process. She will also learn new skills. If reviewers from the press will get back comments in the early winter, with the Dana Assistant's help, I will be able to submit to the press a revised, complete and read-to-go manuscript by the end of the spring semester.

Term Funded:Year 2008
Professor: Neil Diamant


Juliana Nicole Horwath (2008)

Bolivian Political Parties Database Project

This is a database-generating project. As part of a larger investigation on Bolivian political parties, I need to develop a systematic database of Bolivia's political party system during the 20th century. The database itself will be an academic contribution (no such database currently exists, either in English or Spanish); as such, it will be publicly available online. Additionally, the database will then be used for at least one conference paper (to be presented in the Spring), with hope of turning this into an article soon after. The database will also serve as a starting point for a larger multi-case study for which I am the Bolivian investigator (we have applied for an NSF grant for 2008-2010). The duties of the student will primarily include indexing, organizing bibliographical material, fact-checking, and database organization & design, as well as some archival work (when appropriate). The student co-researcher must be able to read in Spanish.

Term Funded:Year 2008
Professor: Miguel Centellas


Amie Elizabeth Knauer (2004)

Television News Coverage of Speaker of the House, 1969-2001

Scholarship on congressional leadership and media (Harris 1998; Melechan & Reagan 2001) document an increase in coverage of speakers of the House on television news over time. They use this evidence to argue leaders' power has been enhanced. As I have argued before "more coverage" does not necessarily result in "more power" because the nature of media coverage is often adversarial and beyond the control of politicians (Larson 1989). It is the purpose of this study to examine the actual television news coverage of Speaker of the House by content analyzing a sample of stories from 1969 to 2001. Variables of particular interest will be tone, conflict, prominence, and Speaker control of the story. Most of these stories have already been obtained using a grant from the Dirksen Congressional Center.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Stephanie Larson


Jillian Louise Laux (2010)

Investigation of the socialization effect of the European Union's ERASMUS university exchange program

The research project we conducted was intended to investigate the role of the European Union's ERASMUS university exchange program in fostering European identity - a shared 'we' feeling that transcends national identity - among program participations. We hypothesized that students who participated in ERASMUS programs to study abroad in another EU member country would tend to identify themselves as more 'European' than students who did not participate in such programs. We also believed that ERASMUS participation would increase students' knowledge of and interest in the European Union, other European countries and other Europeans. To test these hypotheses, we designed a survey, administered it to ERASMUS and non-ERASMUS (French) students studying in Toulouse in the Spring of 2009 and compared the survey responses of the two groups. Questions asked about European identification, attachment to the EU, interest in other Europeans, multilingualism, knowledge about the EU, and a host of other questions. Jillian was studying in Toulouse during this time and her on-site presence facilitated the distribution of the survey to relevant students at five different universities. Our survey was bilingual (offering students either a French or and English option) and administered online. During the two months the survey was 'live' we received around 60 responses.

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Kristine Mitchell


Peter John Moore (1993)

Political Cultures and the Collection of Official Statistics

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1992
Professor: Steven Erfle


Katelyn Anne Musgrave (2012)

Digital literacies in the Dickinson College Class of 2014: a qualitative assessment

A qualitative study of the digital literacies of incoming students at Dickinson, surveying the whole class but focused on one First Year Seminar, will yield insight into how digital media can be effectively deployed in education. A second phase will attempt to apply lessons learned to a Middle East media class in spring 2011. Results will be reported within Dickinson and through conference presentations and articles. A Dana assistant will help with data processing and research in secondary materials.

Term Funded: 2011
Professor: Edward Webb


Gerald Patrick Neugebauer (2000)

Voluntary Terminal Dehydration (VTD) Handbook

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Jim Hoeffler


Michael Joseph O'Brien (2009)

Seizing Domestic Tranquility: Federal Military Intervention between the World Wars (1919-1940)

Breakdowns in political order associated with labor or race violence have at times required American presidents to use federal military force internally. Yet, quantitative research into when and why presidents respond to violent emergencies with military force-as opposed to letting states manage their own societal dislocations-remains limited. Building upon an ongoing investigation into patterns of federal military intervention, a senior political science major named Zak Rosenberg and I will convert roughly 2000 digitized newspaper articles into a dataset that contains over 350 cases of state or federal uses of military force. We will follow protocols I developed for earlier datasets, which code a variety of internal military force use to quell labor, race, and political violence. Federal military intervention during the interwar years (1919 to 1940) was unusually high, marking a transition toward expansions in federal law enforcement and contributing to the emergence of the "modern" presidency. This research posits a political-economy explanation for the increase in federal intervention and endeavors to expand upon investigation into presidential decisions to use soldiers as police.

Term Funded:Year 2009
Professor: Daniel Kenney


Lawrence J Olson (1996)

Challenging the Elite Perspective of American Government

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1994
Professor: Stephanie Larson


Rebecca O'Brien Smith (2000)

Vanishing Caseloads: Exploring the Effects of Welfare Reform

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: James Sloat


Psychology

Leodor Altidor (2014)

NSF 085670 STEP Program at Dickinson College

Through this program, Dickinson intends to recruit and matriculate a "science posse" cohort in each of three years beginning in the fall of 2009. The science posse program will have three major components: 1) a four-week summer pre-matriculation program in which students will participate in lab research and a series of enrichment workshops in chemistry and mathematics; 2) a second eight-week summer of research with Dickinson faculty members using our successful model of student/faculty research; and 3) a capstone eight-week summer research experience at off-campus laboratories in major research universities. The program will provide a strong mentoring experience for underrepresented students to support their pursuit of a science major. The successful implementation of this plan will result in the establishment of a cohort of science major role models for future students among our underrepresented minority groups. Results of the program will be disseminated widely within the broader scientific education community so that they may serve as a model for other institutions.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Megan Yost


Lisa Marie Bollwage (2008)

Bupropion and Secondary Motivational Effects of Nicotine

A. Specific Aims 1) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently enhances the secondary rewarding properties of nicotine during periods of acquisition and expression, Experiments 1 and 2 will examine if bupropion dose-dependently facilitates the acquisition and expression of a nicotine-conditioned place preference, respectively. 2) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the secondary rewarding properties of nicotine during periods of reinstatement and reacquisition, Experiments 3 and 4 will examine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the reinstatement and reacquisition of nicotine-conditioned place preference, respectively. 3) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the secondary aversive properties of nicotine during periods of withdrawal, Experiments 5 and 6 will determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the acquisition and expression of a mecamylamine-precipitated conditioned place aversion in nicotine-dependent rats, respectively.

Term Funded:Year 2007
Professor: Tony Rauhut


Jasmine Alaina Britton (2014)

NSF 085670 STEP Program at Dickinson College

Through this program, Dickinson intends to recruit and matriculate a "science posse" cohort in each of three years beginning in the fall of 2009. The science posse program will have three major components: 1) a four-week summer pre-matriculation program in which students will participate in lab research and a series of enrichment workshops in chemistry and mathematics; 2) a second eight-week summer of research with Dickinson faculty members using our successful model of student/faculty research; and 3) a capstone eight-week summer research experience at off-campus laboratories in major research universities. The program will provide a strong mentoring experience for underrepresented students to support their pursuit of a science major. The successful implementation of this plan will result in the establishment of a cohort of science major role models for future students among our underrepresented minority groups. Results of the program will be disseminated widely within the broader scientific education community so that they may serve as a model for other institutions.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor:


Allen Gearhart Castner (2007)

Bupropion and Secondary Motivational Effects of Nicotine

A. Specific Aims 1) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently enhances the secondary rewarding properties of nicotine during periods of acquisition and expression, Experiments 1 and 2 will examine if bupropion dose-dependently facilitates the acquisition and expression of a nicotine-conditioned place preference, respectively. 2) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the secondary rewarding properties of nicotine during periods of reinstatement and reacquisition, Experiments 3 and 4 will examine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the reinstatement and reacquisition of nicotine-conditioned place preference, respectively. 3) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the secondary aversive properties of nicotine during periods of withdrawal, Experiments 5 and 6 will determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the acquisition and expression of a mecamylamine-precipitated conditioned place aversion in nicotine-dependent rats, respectively.

Term Funded:Year 2007
Professor: Tony Rauhut


Bettina Mariel Cerban (2010)

Moralization, Risk Perceptions, and Smoking Cessation in the U.S. and denmark

Do smokers truly appreciate the health risks they undertake by smoking? We know little about how people come to believe that they are personally at risk and the role that cultural messages play.  One important cultural factor is moralization - the individual and cultural process by which preferences are converted into values.  In the proposed research, two studies will be conducted in the U.S. (a smoking-prohibitive culture where smoking is moralized) and Denmark (a smoking-lenient culture where smoking is much less moralized.)  Study 1 - a qualitative interview study among U.S. and Danish smokers - will examine whether smokers' perceptions of being targets of moralization are associated with risk perceptions of smoking and willingness to quit.  Study 2 - a longitudinal survey study among representative samples of U.S. and Danish smokers and non-smokers - will examine the extent to which individual moralization predicts risk perceptions of smoking and how these factors among smokers predict willingness to quit.  This research will lay the groundwork for more effective educational interventions and smoking cessation programs and thereby contribute to reaching the Healthy People 2010 objective of reducing adult cigarette smoking in the U.S. to 12%.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Alicia Whitney Claggett (2007)

Trauma History, Resources, and Addiction Recovery: Resources, Addictions, and Gender Theories Research in Concert

The proposed study investigates gender similarities and differences in the recovery processes of individuals who suffer from substance dependence, and examines how losses and gains of multi-level coping resources predict successful outcomes. Using a national NIDA-study (grant# 5-R01-DA132231 ) sample of 897 residents of Oxford House-a network of self-supported, democratically-operated homes for recovering substance abusers, the longitudinal data collected as part of NIDA study captures changes in stressors, resources, and substance use over a 1 year interval. Specifically the proposed research will examine gender differences in the relationships between trauma history; intra-, inter-, and extra-personal resources; and recovery processes and outcomes. By collaborating in this research, the student will gain valuable experience working on a large-scale study, being involved in both administrative and applied aspects of research (including conducting data analyses, writing up results for professional publication, and presenting findings at a conference).

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Margaret Davis


Alicia Whitney Claggett (2007)

Physical and Sexual Trauma and the Conservation of Resources: Advancing Substance Abuse Research on Women and Gender

This project focuses on the study of individuals recovering from substance abuse in Oxford House-a network of self-supported democratically-operated homes that provide a mutual-help setting for recovering substance abusers. The proposed research will use data that was collected as part of a study funded by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)(grant# 5-R01-DA132231) that ended August 31, 2005 and used an accelerated longitudinal design containing four waves of data collected once every four months. Specifically the research will examine this national sample of 896 participants for gender differences in the relationships between trauma history; inter- and extra-personal resources; and recovery processes and outcomes. By working on this project, a student will gain valuable experience as a research assistant related to secondary analyses of a large NIDA research grant, and be involved in both administrative and applied aspects of research (e.g., preparing literature review and data bases for analyses).

Term Funded:Spring 2006
Professor: Margaret Davis


Elizabeth Rose Corrigan (2003)

Using a computerized symptom-reporting task with non-students

The summer project will complete an experiment begun this semester. The experiment is intended to advance our understanding of symptom-reporting behavior by asking, Can gender-related variation in self-reported physical symptoms be traced to systematic differences between women and men in the accessibility of symptom memories and/or construals of the symptom-reporting task? The summer project will be devoted to recruiting non-student adults to complete a computer-administered symptom-reporting task and writing a report of the outcome. This proposal requests support for personnel costs and for payments to adults who will be recruited from attendees at summer conferences on the Dickinson campus.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Andy Skelton


Michelle Menuhah Deitchman (2000)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Fall 1999
Professor: Andy Skelton


Michelle Menuhah Deitchman (2000)

Localizing a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks That Controls Learning and Memory for a Non-pecking Aversive Task

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Teresa Barber


Christina Marie Del Valle (2003)

An Investigation of spatial learning in Wistar-Kyoto rats

The aim of the proposed project is to examine the spatial learning abilities of Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, which have been proposed as an animal model for treatment-resistant depression. The behavior of the WKY rat is impaired, in similar ways, to depressed humans and the WKY rat shows increased emotionally and reactivity. We recently found learning impairments in WKY rats trained in a food-rewarded radial arm maze. This raises the possibility that the poor performance of WKY rats in other tasks may actually be due to impaired memory for spatial cues. Previous studies with the WKY rat used aversively motivated escape tasks, which increase stress, and therefore confuse emotionally and reactivity with spatial memory abilities. The proposed project will directly test the hypothesis that the WKY rats have difficulty using spatial cues in an elevated plus shaped maze. In this maze, the rat starts from one of two opposite start arms and then must turn right or left to find a food reward. We hypothesize that if the WKY rat is impaired in spatial ability, then they should be able to learn a simple "response learning" paradigm (turn right or left for food reward regardless of where start arm is located), but should be impaired in acquiring a "place learning" paradigm (turn left or right depending on where start arm is located; this task cannot be solved without using spatial cues).

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Teresa Barber


Karen Marie Del Vecchio (2009)

Bupropion and Secondary Motivational Effects of Nicotine

A. Specific Aims 1) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently enhances the secondary rewarding properties of nicotine during periods of acquisition and expression, Experiments 1 and 2 will examine if bupropion dose-dependently facilitates the acquisition and expression of a nicotine-conditioned place preference, respectively. 2) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the secondary rewarding properties of nicotine during periods of reinstatement and reacquisition, Experiments 3 and 4 will examine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the reinstatement and reacquisition of nicotine-conditioned place preference, respectively. 3) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the secondary aversive properties of nicotine during periods of withdrawal, Experiments 5 and 6 will determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the acquisition and expression of a mecamylamine-precipitated conditioned place aversion in nicotine-dependent rats, respectively.

Term Funded:Year 2007
Professor: Tony Rauhut


Margaret Carmela Della Vecchia (2010)

Bupropion and Secondary Motivational Effects of Nicotine

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Tony Rauhut


Kristyn Diane DiDominick (2004)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Kristyn Diane DiDominick (2004)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Year 2004
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Sarah Helweg DiMuccio (2015)

Collaborative Research in Precarious Manhood and Masculinity

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: Megan Yost


Kathleen Marie Dougherty (2006)

Norepinephrine and the Behavioral Effects of Nicotine

Considerable research has shown that the mesolimbic dopaminergic system mediates the locomotor-activating and rewarding properties of nicotine; properties associated with the addictive potential of nicotine. Recently, several studies have shown that the noradrenergic system interacts with the dopaminergic system to mediate the locomotor-activating and rewarding properties of other addictive drugs (e.g., psychostimulants and opioids). Little research, however, has examined the interaction of the noradrenergic and dopaminergic systems in mediating the locomotor-activating and rewarding properties of nicotine. The present proposed experiment seeks to determine the role of the noradrenergic system in mediating the rewarding and locomotor-activating properties of nicotine. To this end, the effect of the ±1-receptor antagonist, prazosin, on nicotine-conditioned place preference and nicotine-induced hyperactivity will be determined. A better understanding of the mechanism(s) by which other neurotransmitter systems interact with the mesolimbic dopaminergic will help gain a richer and more complete understanding of nicotine addiction.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Tony Rauhut


Alaisa Cordes Emery (2012)

Developing a new model of human perception and action under danger or threat

The integration of human perception and action is fairly well understood. However, there currently is not a model to describe how these systems work when danger or threat is present. I am developing such a model. Researching with two students in the summer would allow me to finish a current study and conduct another. These two studies are key to developing and testing the new model. One study investigates top-down influences on perception, the other subconscious influences. The students I would be working with have been in my lab for about two years and have a full understanding both of the model and the studies, and are highly proficient at operating the electrophysiological equipment and analyzing data. The students and I are collaborating with other researchers and have assigned roles and authorship for the project. Students will help in all phases of the project, including help in writing the manuscript.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Jon Page


Kelle Diane Falls (2004)

Effects of Unilateral Lesion Studies in Left or Right IMHV on Memory for Two difference Learning Tasks in Day-old Chicks.

The aim of the proposed research in my NSF-RUI grant was to investigate the specific role of a forebrain structure, the IMHV, in memory formation in day-old chicks. During the first three years of the grant, my research students collaborated with me to examine the role of the IMHV in memory formation for a one trail water reward task, sickness-conditioned place aversion learning, and conditioned place preference. An important aspect of this research, proposed in the original grant, but as yet undetermined, is whether the effects of our lesions in these tasks are specific to the left or right hemispheres. The approved extension of the NSF-RUI is to examine the effects of unilateral left or right IMHV lesions in the sickness-conditioned place aversion and conditioned place preference tasks (bilateral lesions were not amnestic in the water-reward task). Two students working together during the summer will be able to collect data during the 8 weeks of summer, and the following months of the grant will be devoted to analyses and dissemination of the results. The students will alternate between and become proficient in all components of the research project. Each student will take major responsiblity for one of the projects, and this project will become the focus of their research training. Following this summer of data collection, the students will analyze the results, write reports based on these studies, and then, as is often the case, will attend and present their research, as first authors, at a National Conference.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Teresa Barber


Kelle Diane Falls (2004)

NSF 9985592 RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks Thought to Control Learning and Memory

The aim of the proposed research was to investigate the specific role of a forebrain structure, the intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) in memory formation in day-old chicks. Previous work determined that many biochemical and electrophysiological changes occur in the IMHV concomitant with memory retention in a one-trial passive avoidance task; a pecking task that requires response inhibition to demonstrate learnin9. Although many changes in the IMHV occur after passive avoidance training, this is a specific, and in many ways, a unique learning paradigm.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Teresa Barber


Robert Kennedy Flatley (1992)

An Investigation of Intellectual Level during Schizophrenic Disorder

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1991
Professor: Margaret Pepe


Michael Stephen Fogler (2014)

Examining Environmentally-Relevant Attitudes and Behavior

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: James Skelton


Gregory Dix Frantz (1997)

Towards a Cognitive Structural Model of Computer Aversion in Multiple Subject Populations

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: Walter Chromiak


Emily Louise Furthman (2004)

Effects of Unilateral Lesion Studies in Left or Right IMHV on Memory for Two difference Learning Tasks in Day-old Chicks.

The aim of the proposed research in my NSF-RUI grant was to investigate the specific role of a forebrain structure, the IMHV, in memory formation in day-old chicks. During the first three years of the grant, my research students collaborated with me to examine the role of the IMHV in memory formation for a one trail water reward task, sickness-conditioned place aversion learning, and conditioned place preference. An important aspect of this research, proposed in the original grant, but as yet undetermined, is whether the effects of our lesions in these tasks are specific to the left or right hemispheres. The approved extension of the NSF-RUI is to examine the effects of unilateral left or right IMHV lesions in the sickness-conditioned place aversion and conditioned place preference tasks (bilateral lesions were not amnestic in the water-reward task). Two students working together during the summer will be able to collect data during the 8 weeks of summer, and the following months of the grant will be devoted to analyses and dissemination of the results. The students will alternate between and become proficient in all components of the research project. Each student will take major responsiblity for one of the projects, and this project will become the focus of their research training. Following this summer of data collection, the students will analyze the results, write reports based on these studies, and then, as is often the case, will attend and present their research, as first authors, at a National Conference.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Teresa Barber


Emily Louise Furthman (2004)

NSF 9985592 RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks Thought to Control Learning and Memory

The aim of the proposed research was to investigate the specific role of a forebrain structure, the intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) in memory formation in day-old chicks. Previous work determined that many biochemical and electrophysiological changes occur in the IMHV concomitant with memory retention in a one-trial passive avoidance task; a pecking task that requires response inhibition to demonstrate learnin9. Although many changes in the IMHV occur after passive avoidance training, this is a specific, and in many ways, a unique learning paradigm.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Teresa Barber


Emily Louise Furthman (2004)

Behavioral model of reinforcement to examine the effects of feedback and goal setting on organizational productivity

Much of the research in Industrial and Organizational psychology focuses on the productivity of the employee. The student will be taken through the research process step by step and will participate (with the guidance of the researcher) on every step of the project. The student will accompany the researcher in meetings with the organization's manager and will assist in the planning stages of the research. This project has scholarly significance because the student will be involved with every aspect of a research project from start to finish. By going through these steps it is my hope that the student will get a clear understanding of the planning that goes into a research project before any data is collected. The student will also be applying the tenets of behavioral theory to a concrete organizational problem, and through conducting an experiment in an actual organization, the student will have a first hand account of the ethics of applied research.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Diane DiClemente


Kaitlyn Ann Gregory (2014)

How Prior Information and Context Influences Perception

One of my long-term research goals is to develop a new model of perception and action that takes into account how the human central nervous system functions when a threat or danger is present. Numerous studies have shown that our system does operate differntly under stress; a theoretical model is needed to synthesize these findings and give direction for future questions. Related to this is a need to develop techniques to appropriately deal with dangerous or threatening situations. Thus, another goal of mine is to develop a cognitive technique where verbal cues are learned to automatization and used as a tool to reduce stress and increase cognitive functioning and control during such encounters. The research described in this application would further both of these goals.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Jon Page


Christopher William Griffith (2001)

Gender differences in symptom-reporting behavior: Examining characteristics of the reporting task.

The summer project will lay groundwork for two experiments, to be conducted during the 2000-01 academic year, on the problem of gender differences in reports of physical symptoms. The experiments are intended to advance our understanding of symptom-reporting behavior by asking, What are respondents doing when they answer health surveys?, and Does variation in respondents' interpretation of survey instructions help explain men's under-reporting of symptoms, relative to women, on retrospective questionnaires? The summer project will be devoted to drafting and pilot-testing the survey questionnaires to be used in the planned experiments and to developing and testing computer software for administering questionnaires and measuring speed of replies to the questionnaire items. This proposal requests support for personnel costs, software purchases, and payments to staff and students who will be recruited for trial runs of our questionnaire and computerized procedure during the summer months.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Andy Skelton


Ashley Anne Gruszecki (2007)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Megan K Haggarty (2008)

Acetylcholine, Glutamate, and Learning in a Model of Alzheimer's Disease

An estimated 4.5 million Americans have Alzheimer's disease, whose symptoms include progressive, marked defecits in perception, cognition, memory, and language. While there is no cure for Alzheimer's, there are two pharmacological treatments, acetylcholinesterase inhibitors and glutamate receptor blockers. There is considerable evidence that both acetylcholine and glutamate are involved in memory loss due to Alzheimer's disease, but the relationship between acetylcholine and glutamate is unclear. The current study seeks to determine the relationship between acetylcholine and glutamate in memory, by examining the effects of memantine in scopolamine-induced amnesia in the day-old chick. Experiments will assess the ability of memantine to ameliorate the amnesia produced by scopolamine and determine the specificity of the effect through the glutamate system.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Teresa Barber


Matthew Delayne Halvorson (2013)

Attributions in Sports

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: James Skelton


Jennifer Catherine Hannett (2000)

Do posttraining IMHV lesions impair retention of a one-trial, water-reward task in day old chicks?

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Teresa Barber


Andrew Robert Hart (2005)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Andrew Robert Hart (2005)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Year 2005
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Megan L Harvey (2006)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Fall 2005
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Megan L Harvey (2006)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Michael Peter Hawrylak (2007)

Bupropion and Secondary Motivational Effects of Nicotine

A. Specific Aims 1) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently enhances the secondary rewarding properties of nicotine during periods of acquisition and expression, Experiments 1 and 2 will examine if bupropion dose-dependently facilitates the acquisition and expression of a nicotine-conditioned place preference, respectively. 2) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the secondary rewarding properties of nicotine during periods of reinstatement and reacquisition, Experiments 3 and 4 will examine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the reinstatement and reacquisition of nicotine-conditioned place preference, respectively. 3) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the secondary aversive properties of nicotine during periods of withdrawal, Experiments 5 and 6 will determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the acquisition and expression of a mecamylamine-precipitated conditioned place aversion in nicotine-dependent rats, respectively.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Tony Rauhut


Michael Peter Hawrylak (2007)

Bupropion and Secondary Motivational Effects of Nicotine

A. Specific Aims 1) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently enhances the secondary rewarding properties of nicotine during periods of acquisition and expression, Experiments 1 and 2 will examine if bupropion dose-dependently facilitates the acquisition and expression of a nicotine-conditioned place preference, respectively. 2) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the secondary rewarding properties of nicotine during periods of reinstatement and reacquisition, Experiments 3 and 4 will examine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the reinstatement and reacquisition of nicotine-conditioned place preference, respectively. 3) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the secondary aversive properties of nicotine during periods of withdrawal, Experiments 5 and 6 will determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the acquisition and expression of a mecamylamine-precipitated conditioned place aversion in nicotine-dependent rats, respectively.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Tony Rauhut


David Ryan Hengerer (2012)

NASA GCCE Grant: Estimated Savings from Smart Power Strips

Estimated Savings from Smart Power Strips

Term Funded:Spring 2011
Professor: Andy Skelton


Amanda Marie Hitz (1997)

Memory formation for sickbess conditioned aversion in day-old chicks

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1996
Professor: Teresa Barber


Ashley Lyn Hoover (2007)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Spring 2006
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Ashley Lyn Hoover (2007)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Pamela Dawn Howorth (1996)

Role of the Intermediate Medial Hyperstriatum Ventrale in memory formation for sickness conditioned aversion in chicks.

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1995
Professor: Teresa Barber


Pamela Dawn Howorth (1996)

Role of the Intermediate Medial Hyperstriatum Ventrale in memory formation for sickness \conditioned aversion in chicks.

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1995
Professor: Teresa Barber


Carrie Ann Keck (2002)

NSF 9985592 RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks Thought to Control Learning and Memory

The aim of the proposed research was to investigate the specific role of a forebrain structure, the intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) in memory formation in day-old chicks. Previous work determined that many biochemical and electrophysiological changes occur in the IMHV concomitant with memory retention in a one-trial passive avoidance task; a pecking task that requires response inhibition to demonstrate learnin9. Although many changes in the IMHV occur after passive avoidance training, this is a specific, and in many ways, a unique learning paradigm.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Teresa Barber


Carrie Ann Keck (2002)

RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks Thought to Control Learning and Memory

Funding from the NSF would support an in-depth study of the role of a forebrain structure thought to control learning and memory in the day-old chick. This three-year grant will provide support for myself and two student researchers for 12 hours a week during the Spring Semester, and 8 weeks each summer (2000-2002). Experiments are designed to investigate the functional role of this forebrain area (the IMHV) in greater detail, to allow us to understand the specific role of the IMHV in pecking, non-pecking, aversive and appetitive types of learning in the day old chick. During the first spring-summer we will turn our attention to the role of the IMHV in memory formation for passive avoidance and sickness conditioned learning. In the second spring-summer, we will focus on the role of the IMHV in memory formation for an aversive, non-pecking task. During the third, spring-summer, we will investigate the effects of IMHV lesions on memory formation for an appetitive, non-pecking task.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Teresa Barber


Tiffany Nicole Kimbrough (2007)

Study of the Relationship Between Arousal and Learning

In summer 2004 I mentored Jen and a second student, Shannon Lilly '05. My faculty stipend was funded through Research and Development, in conjunction with a Howard Hughes Medical Institute student faculty research grant (Lilly), and funds provided by Pennsylvania Department of Health collaborative grant with Carnegie Mellon University (Lilly).

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Teresa Barber


Emily Courtney Knight (2014)

Substance Use and Substance Abuse Recovery in Adolescents and Young Adults

The Dana Research Assistantship would support the final phase of a mixed method investigation designed to address two research questions: (1) to describe the contexts of individual's substance use initiation and to investigate whether the contexts of initiation differ for early initiators when compared to later initiators and (2) to describe the process of recovery from substance abuse and responses to 12-Step Recovery programs (Alcoholic Anonymous/Narcotics Anonymous) for young adults. The results of this study will inform substance abuse prevention efforts designed to deter early initiation of substance use, a risk factor for substance dependence and other poor developmental outcomes. The study will also add to the very sparse literature on substance abuse recovery among young adults. The Dana Research Assistant will assist in the coding of 90 qualitative research interviews using qualitative research software MaxQDA and will develop her own research question using the study data and will prepare a first author poster to be presented at a professional research conference in 2014. The Dana Research Assistant will also assist with the compilation of bibliographies and literature reviews and manuscript preparation.

Term Funded:summer 2013
Professor: Sharon Kingston


Brendan Lavin (2000)

An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks Thought to Control Learning and Memor

Term Funded:Year 2000
Professor: Teresa Barber


Kaixin Liu (2014)

Recording Somatosensory Evoked Potentials in Humans

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: Jonathan Page


Taylor Marie Ludman (2014)

How Prior Information and Context Influences Perception

One of my long-term research goals is to develop a new model of perception and action that takes into account how the human central nervous system functions when a threat or danger is present. Numerous studies have shown that our system does operate differntly under stress; a theoretical model is needed to synthesize these findings and give direction for future questions. Related to this is a need to develop techniques to appropriately deal with dangerous or threatening situations. Thus, another goal of mine is to develop a cognitive technique where verbal cues are learned to automatization and used as a tool to reduce stress and increase cognitive functioning and control during such encounters. The research described in this application would further both of these goals.

Term Funded:Summer 2013
Professor: Jon Page


Stacey Kathryn Mardekian (2008)

Bupropion and Secondary Motivational Effects of Nicotine

Recently, in vitro (i.e., preparations involving brain tissue) studies have shown that the atypical antidepressant, bupropion, targets and antagonizes nicotinic receptors (Slemmer et al., 2000). Many of the behavioral effects of nicotine are mediated by its interaction with nicotinic receptors. Little research, however, has examined the ability of bupropion to antagonize the behavioral effects of nicotine in an in vivo (i.e., whole animal) preparation. Thus, the present experiment determined the ability of bupropion, to alter the aversive properties of nicotine. To this end, the effect of bupropion on nicotine conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in male CD-1 mice was determined.

Term Funded:Fall 2006
Professor: Tony Rauhut


Stacey Kathryn Mardekian (2008)

Bupropion and Secondary Motivational Effects of Nicotine

Recently, in vitro (i.e., preparations involving brain tissue) studies have shown that the atypical antidepressant, bupropion, targets and antagonizes nicotinic receptors (Slemmer et al., 2000). Many of the behavioral effects of nicotine are mediated by its interaction with nicotinic receptors. Little research, however, has examined the ability of bupropion to antagonize the behavioral effects of nicotine in an in vivo (i.e., whole animal) preparation. Thus, the present experiment determined the ability of bupropion, to alter the aversive properties of nicotine. To this end, the effect of bupropion on nicotine conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in male CD-1 mice was determined.

Term Funded:Summer 2007
Professor: Tony Rauhut


Stacey Kathryn Mardekian (2008)

Bupropion and Secondary Motivational Effects of Nicotine

Recently, in vitro (i.e., preparations involving brain tissue) studies have shown that the atypical antidepressant, bupropion, targets and antagonizes nicotinic receptors (Slemmer et al., 2000). Many of the behavioral effects of nicotine are mediated by its interaction with nicotinic receptors. Little research, however, has examined the ability of bupropion to antagonize the behavioral effects of nicotine in an in vivo (i.e., whole animal) preparation. Thus, the present experiment determined the ability of bupropion, to alter the aversive properties of nicotine. To this end, the effect of bupropion on nicotine conditioned taste aversion (CTA) in male CD-1 mice was determined.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Tony Rauhut


Brian Francis McGettigan (2003)

NSF 9985592 RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks Thought to Control Learning and Memory

The aim of the proposed research was to investigate the specific role of a forebrain structure, the intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) in memory formation in day-old chicks. Previous work determined that many biochemical and electrophysiological changes occur in the IMHV concomitant with memory retention in a one-trial passive avoidance task; a pecking task that requires response inhibition to demonstrate learnin9. Although many changes in the IMHV occur after passive avoidance training, this is a specific, and in many ways, a unique learning paradigm.

Term Funded:Spring 2002
Professor: Teresa Barber


Brian Francis McGettigan (2003)

NSF 9985592 RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks Thought to Control Learning and Memory

The aim of the proposed research was to investigate the specific role of a forebrain structure, the intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) in memory formation in day-old chicks. Previous work determined that many biochemical and electrophysiological changes occur in the IMHV concomitant with memory retention in a one-trial passive avoidance task; a pecking task that requires response inhibition to demonstrate learnin9. Although many changes in the IMHV occur after passive avoidance training, this is a specific, and in many ways, a unique learning paradigm.

Term Funded:Spring 2003
Professor: Teresa Barber


Brian Francis McGettigan (2003)

NSF 9985592 RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks Thought to Control Learning and Memory

The aim of the proposed research was to investigate the specific role of a forebrain structure, the intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) in memory formation in day-old chicks. Previous work determined that many biochemical and electrophysiological changes occur in the IMHV concomitant with memory retention in a one-trial passive avoidance task; a pecking task that requires response inhibition to demonstrate learnin9. Although many changes in the IMHV occur after passive avoidance training, this is a specific, and in many ways, a unique learning paradigm.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Teresa Barber


Jennifer Davis Meis (2002)

RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old ChicksThought to Control Learning and Memory

Funding from the NSF would support an in-depth study of the role of a forebrain structure thought to control learning and memory in the day-old chick. This three-year grant will provide support for myself and two student researchers for 12 hours a week during the Spring Semester, and 8 weeks each summer (2000-2002). Experiments are designed to investigate the functional role of this forebrain area (the IMHV) in greater detail, to allow us to understand the specific role of the IMHV in pecking, non-pecking, aversive and appetitive types of learning in the day old chick. During the first spring-summer we will turn our attention to the role of the IMHV in memory formation for passive avoidance and sickness conditioned learning. In the second spring-summer, we will focus on the role of the IMHV in memory formation for an aversive, non-pecking task. During the third, spring-summer, we will investigate the effects of IMHV lesions on memory formation for an appetitive, non-pecking task.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Teresa Barber


Jennifer Davis Meis (2002)

NSF 9985592 RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks Thought to Control Learning and Memory

The aim of the proposed research was to investigate the specific role of a forebrain structure, the intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) in memory formation in day-old chicks. Previous work determined that many biochemical and electrophysiological changes occur in the IMHV concomitant with memory retention in a one-trial passive avoidance task; a pecking task that requires response inhibition to demonstrate learnin9. Although many changes in the IMHV occur after passive avoidance training, this is a specific, and in many ways, a unique learning paradigm.

Term Funded:Summer 2001
Professor: Teresa Barber


Allyson Meloni (2004)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Year 2004
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Allyson Meloni (2004)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Elizabeth Kathryn Meschio (2013)

Attributions in Sports

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor: James Skelton


Matthew Aaron Oaks (2003)

NSF 9985592 RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks Thought to Control Learning and Memory

The aim of the proposed research was to investigate the specific role of a forebrain structure, the intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) in memory formation in day-old chicks. Previous work determined that many biochemical and electrophysiological changes occur in the IMHV concomitant with memory retention in a one-trial passive avoidance task; a pecking task that requires response inhibition to demonstrate learnin9. Although many changes in the IMHV occur after passive avoidance training, this is a specific, and in many ways, a unique learning paradigm.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Teresa Barber


Matthew Aaron Oaks (2003)

NSF 9985592 RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks Thought to Control Learning and Memory

The aim of the proposed research was to investigate the specific role of a forebrain structure, the intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) in memory formation in day-old chicks. Previous work determined that many biochemical and electrophysiological changes occur in the IMHV concomitant with memory retention in a one-trial passive avoidance task; a pecking task that requires response inhibition to demonstrate learnin9. Although many changes in the IMHV occur after passive avoidance training, this is a specific, and in many ways, a unique learning paradigm.

Term Funded:Spring 2002
Professor: Teresa Barber


Matthew Aaron Oaks (2003)

NSF 9985592 RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks Thought to Control Learning and Memory

The aim of the proposed research was to investigate the specific role of a forebrain structure, the intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) in memory formation in day-old chicks. Previous work determined that many biochemical and electrophysiological changes occur in the IMHV concomitant with memory retention in a one-trial passive avoidance task; a pecking task that requires response inhibition to demonstrate learnin9. Although many changes in the IMHV occur after passive avoidance training, this is a specific, and in many ways, a unique learning paradigm.

Term Funded:Spring 2003
Professor: Teresa Barber


Michelle Knowles Osterman (2004)

Primacy of gender (not of affect) in unconscious processing of language

"Primacy of affect" is the notion that when a word is processed, the very first information that is analyzed about it is its affective valence--the unpleasantness of its referent. Advocates of affective primacy have argued that affective processing occurs rapidly, automatically, and unconsciously, prior to conscious word recognition. But recent empirical findings have challenged at least one tenet of affective primacy: that it occurs unconsciously. These findings have been interpreted more generally as challenging a widely-held view that some aspects of language processing are handled by unconscious systems in the brain. (The argument is that if affect is not processed unconsciously, no other aspects of language are likely to be.) The proposed research examines the possibility that another aspect of language, gender, for which there is compelling evidence of rapid and obligatory processing, may routinely undergo unconscious processing even if affect does not.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Richard Abrams


Michelle Knowles Osterman (2004)

Meta Analytic review of psychological literature on homesickness

A Dana Research Assistant is requested for the Spring 2003 semester to assist in the completion of a meta-analytic review of the psychological literature on homesickness. Meta-analytic reviews undertake statistical analyses of the strength of a phenomenon, its' variability, and the nature and relative strength of moderator variables affecting that phenomenon. In the current project meta-analysis is being employed to assess the relative contributions age, nature of separation, duration of separation, distance from home, and perceived distance from home have on the degree of homesickness experienced. In contrast to purely narrative literature reviews, the statistical techniques employed in meta-analysis will allow for the quantification of an integration of diverse results to better understand the factors that contribute to homesickness.

Term Funded:Spring 2003
Professor: Gregory Smith


Loren Juliette Tyson Pease (2013)

Collaborative Research in Gender and Sexuality

Term Funded:Fall 2012
Professor:


Laurel Marie Peterson (2006)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Laurel Marie Peterson (2006)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Year 2005
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Laurel Marie Peterson (2006)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Laurel Marie Peterson (2006)

Collaboration to Reduce Disparities in Hypertension

Dickinson, The University of Pennsylvania and Cheyney College entered into a collaborative project to study cardiovascular disease (hypertension). The objective of the study was to assist in the elimination or reduction of disparities in health status, outcome, prevention or treatment in minority communities. The project studied the effectiveness of efforts to reduce and eliminate racial/ethnic and socioeconomic health disparities, understand their mediating factors, and develop multidisciplinary strategies and interventions to reduce them. The project expanded research skills and understanding of intervention strategies among emerging, new, and established investigators at Cheyney, Dickinson, and Penn. The goals were to promote the development of junior investigators at all levels of education (undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral); develop health disparities research capacity at all institutions; and increase the competitiveness of these institutions for future federal funding in health disparities and mediation research.

Term Funded:Year 2004
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Brianne Joan Petrie (2002)

NSF 9985592 RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks Thought to Control Learning and Memory

The aim of the proposed research was to investigate the specific role of a forebrain structure, the intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) in memory formation in day-old chicks. Previous work determined that many biochemical and electrophysiological changes occur in the IMHV concomitant with memory retention in a one-trial passive avoidance task; a pecking task that requires response inhibition to demonstrate learnin9. Although many changes in the IMHV occur after passive avoidance training, this is a specific, and in many ways, a unique learning paradigm.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Teresa Barber


Brianne Joan Petrie (2002)

RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old ChicksThought to Control Learning and Memory

Funding from the NSF would support an in-depth study of the role of a forebrain structure thought to control learning and memory in the day-old chick. This three-year grant will provide support for myself and two student researchers for 12 hours a week during the Spring Semester, and 8 weeks each summer (2000-2002). Experiments are designed to investigate the functional role of this forebrain area (the IMHV) in greater detail, to allow us to understand the specific role of the IMHV in pecking, non-pecking, aversive and appetitive types of learning in the day old chick. During the first spring-summer we will turn our attention to the role of the IMHV in memory formation for passive avoidance and sickness conditioned learning. In the second spring-summer, we will focus on the role of the IMHV in memory formation for an aversive, non-pecking task. During the third, spring-summer, we will investigate the effects of IMHV lesions on memory formation for an appetitive, non-pecking task.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Teresa Barber


Monique Marie Ritchey (1998)

Function of the Intermediate Medial Hyperstriatum Ventrale in Memory Formation for Shape and Size Discrimination Learning in the Day-Old Chick

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1997
Professor: Teresa Barber


Jamie Layman Rizza (2003)

Solo Status as a Moderator of Stereotype Threat in the College Environment

The following application is for a New Dana Student Research Assistantship with Jamie Layman, a junior in psychology. The research project proposed involves an archival investigation of two established effects in the stereotypes literature labeled stereotype threat and the solo (or token) effect. Both involve aspects of stereotypes and the salience of stereotypes within particular environments. Stereotype threat is a phenomenon in which the knowledge of one's stereotype may adversely influence one's performance on stereotype relevant tasks. The second psychological phenomenon relevant to stereotypes and scholastic performance tested in this proposal is the solo (or token) effect. This influence on performance occurs in situations where individuals find themselves as solos (or distinct minorities) within their environment.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: W. Eric Sykes


Emily Anne Seklecki (2013)

Implementing Waste Mitigation Strategies

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: James Skelton


Emily Margaret Snell (2015)

Examining Environmentally-Relevant Attitudes and Behavior

Term Funded: 2012-13
Professor: James Skelton


Nicole Ramotowski Stewart (2001)

RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old ChicksThought to Control Learning and Memory

Funding from the NSF would support an in-depth study of the role of a forebrain structure thought to control learning and memory in the day-old chick. This three-year grant will provide support for myself and two student researchers for 12 hours a week during the Spring Semester, and 8 weeks each summer (2000-2002). Experiments are designed to investigate the functional role of this forebrain area (the IMHV) in greater detail, to allow us to understand the specific role of the IMHV in pecking, non-pecking, aversive and appetitive types of learning in the day old chick. During the first spring-summer we will turn our attention to the role of the IMHV in memory formation for passive avoidance and sickness conditioned learning. In the second spring-summer, we will focus on the role of the IMHV in memory formation for an aversive, non-pecking task. During the third, spring-summer, we will investigate the effects of IMHV lesions on memory formation for an appetitive, non-pecking task.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Teresa Barber


Nicole Ramotowski Stewart (2001)

NSF 9985592 RUI: An Investigation of the Functional Role of a Brain Area in Day-Old Chicks Thought to Control Learning and Memory

The aim of the proposed research was to investigate the specific role of a forebrain structure, the intermediate medial hyperstriatum ventrale (IMHV) in memory formation in day-old chicks. Previous work determined that many biochemical and electrophysiological changes occur in the IMHV concomitant with memory retention in a one-trial passive avoidance task; a pecking task that requires response inhibition to demonstrate learnin9. Although many changes in the IMHV occur after passive avoidance training, this is a specific, and in many ways, a unique learning paradigm.

Term Funded:Summer 2000
Professor: Teresa Barber


Tara Michelle Studley (2007)

Research on Parental Influences on College Students

The Dana Assistant will work 8 hours per week during the spring semester on a research program designed to study the impact of parenting styles on college students' homesickness, adjustment to college, self-esteem, and self-efficacy. They will be involved in virtually all aspects of research including distribution and collection of research materials; scoring and coding of measures; data analysis; library research; and the preparation of conference presentations and journal manuscripts. The Dana Assistant should have a good understanding of research methodology, statistical analysis within psychology, use of SPSS in data analysis, and software for developing on-line questionnaires.

Term Funded:Spring 2006
Professor: Gregory Smith


Jason Bryant Tanenbaum (2007)

Bupropion and Secondary Motivational Effects of Nicotine

A. Specific Aims 1) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently enhances the secondary rewarding properties of nicotine during periods of acquisition and expression, Experiments 1 and 2 will examine if bupropion dose-dependently facilitates the acquisition and expression of a nicotine-conditioned place preference, respectively. 2) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the secondary rewarding properties of nicotine during periods of reinstatement and reacquisition, Experiments 3 and 4 will examine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the reinstatement and reacquisition of nicotine-conditioned place preference, respectively. 3) To determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the secondary aversive properties of nicotine during periods of withdrawal, Experiments 5 and 6 will determine if bupropion dose-dependently attenuates the acquisition and expression of a mecamylamine-precipitated conditioned place aversion in nicotine-dependent rats, respectively.

Term Funded:Year 2007
Professor: Tony Rauhut


Emily Elizabeth Thurston (2004)

An investigation of spatial learning in Wistar-Kyoto rats.

The aim of the proposed project is to examine spatial learning in Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats, which have been proposed as an animal model for treatment-resistant depression. The WKY rat is impaired in similar ways to "depressed" individuals in many aversive and escape-oriented tasks (learned helplessness, open field, forced swim, and passive avoidance) and it has been suggested that the impairments shown by the WKY rats are due to increased emotionality and hyperreactivity. However, we have recently raised the possibility that the poor performance of WKY rats may be due to impaired memory. In an aversive task, it is difficult to tease out performance factors such as emotionality and hyperreactivity from spatial memory abilities. Spatial memory is dependent upon intact functioning of the hippocampus, and there is some evidence that the size of the hippocampus in WKY rats is smaller than controls (although this study sample size was small). If this finding is true, it is likely that the WKY rat is impaired in spatial learning.

Term Funded:Summer 2002
Professor: Teresa Barber


Margaret Rose Tobias (2010)

Moralization, Risk Perceptions, and Smoking Cessation in the U.S. and denmark

Do smokers truly appreciate the health risks they undertake by smoking? We know little about how people come to believe that they are personally at risk and the role that cultural messages play.  One important cultural factor is moralization - the individual and cultural process by which preferences are converted into values.  In the proposed research, two studies will be conducted in the U.S. (a smoking-prohibitive culture where smoking is moralized) and Denmark (a smoking-lenient culture where smoking is much less moralized.)  Study 1 - a qualitative interview study among U.S. and Danish smokers - will examine whether smokers' perceptions of being targets of moralization are associated with risk perceptions of smoking and willingness to quit.  Study 2 - a longitudinal survey study among representative samples of U.S. and Danish smokers and non-smokers - will examine the extent to which individual moralization predicts risk perceptions of smoking and how these factors among smokers predict willingness to quit.  This research will lay the groundwork for more effective educational interventions and smoking cessation programs and thereby contribute to reaching the Healthy People 2010 objective of reducing adult cigarette smoking in the U.S. to 12%.

Term Funded:Summer 2008
Professor: Marie Helweg-Larsen


Deana Maryann Vitrano (2012)

Developing a new model of human perception and action under danger or threat

The integration of human perception and action is fairly well understood. However, there currently is not a model to describe how these systems work when danger or threat is present. I am developing such a model. Researching with two students in the summer would allow me to finish a current study and conduct another. These two studies are key to developing and testing the new model. One study investigates top-down influences on perception, the other subconscious influences. The students I would be working with have been in my lab for about two years and have a full understanding both of the model and the studies, and are highly proficient at operating the electrophysiological equipment and analyzing data. The students and I are collaborating with other researchers and have assigned roles and authorship for the project. Students will help in all phases of the project, including help in writing the manuscript.

Term Funded:summer 2012
Professor: Jonathan Page


Andre O'Neil White (2011)

Bupropion and Secondary Motivational Effects of Nicotine

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 2009
Professor: Tony Rauhut


Justin Michael Williams (2013)

Effects of Curcuminoids on learning and memory in Day-Old Chicks

Alzheimer's disease is the sixth-leading cause of death in this country. It is a progressive, incurable disorder, whose hallmark symptoms are impaired memory and cognition (Lleó, Greenberg, & Growdon, 2006). In Alzheimer's disease, there is a dramatic reduction in the levels of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (Whitehouse, Price, Clark, Coyle, & De- Long, 1981). Many studies have determined that acetylcholine is important for memory formation. Memory is associated with increased levels of acetylcholine, and agents that reduce acetylcholine are associated with memory impairment (Rusted & Warburton, 1988; Watts, Stevens & Robinson, 1981). In our laboratory, we explore memory through the use of a paradigm called taste avoidance learning in the day-old chick. In this task, a chick pecks a bead coated with an aversive-tasting liquid, such as methylanthranilate (MeA), and consequently expresses a well defined ''disgust" response. Because the chick associates the bead with the bad taste, it will avoid pecking similar looking beads at test (Lee-Teng & Sherman, 1966). Training, which can occur with only a single 30 sec presentation of the MeA-covered bead, results in reliable memory retention lasting at least 24 hours, accompanied by well-known discrete biochemical and physiological consequences (see Rose, 2004). Learning of the taste-avoidance task requires activity in the cholinergic system. When chicks are trained on the task, measures of acetylcholine activity increase (Rose, Gibbs, & Hambley; 1980; Mezey, Székely, Bourne, Kabai, & Csillag, 1999; Bullock, Csillag, & Rose, 1987). Inhibition of acetylcholine release produces significant amnesia in the taste-avoidance task (Patterson, Lipton, Bennett, & Rosenzweig, 1990; Zhao, Feng, Bennett, & Ng, 1997). We inhibit acetylcholine by giving the drug scopolamine. I both humans and non-human animals, memory under the influence of scopolamine is very similar to that seen in Alzheimer's disease, in which memory is strong for a few minutes, but the conversion of memory from short-term to long-term memory does not take place, and a few hours after learning, amnesia is present (see Barber & Haggarty, 2010). Given the relationship between acetylcholine, memory, and Alzheimer's disease, it's not surprising to find that the most common treatment for memory loss in Alzheimer's disease are drugs that increase acetylcholine activity. Donepezil (Aricept®) helps memories by increasing the amount of acetylcholine available at the synapse, and is an effective treatment for early to mild Alzheimer's. However, the effects of donepezil are transitory, and eventually the drug treatment is ineffective and memory impairments become increasingly impairing (Perl, 2000). We fear contracting Alzheimer's disease, particularly because the only known risk factor is age (Alzheimer's.org). We fear losing our minds, our memories, and our ability to remain healthy as we age. It's therefore not surprising to find that many people use herbal remedies and food supplements that purport to increase memory abilities. Search the Internet for "supplements", "improve", and "memory", and you will get 13,100,000 results (google.com). Do any of these supplements actually work? Is there scientific evidence that supports the use of these supplements? Most of the evidence for their effectiveness of supplements is based on testimonial evidence. Very few of these agents have been tested in the laboratory, mostly because few models of memory impairment exist.

Term Funded:Summer 2012
Professor: Teresa Barber


Barbara Wisniewska-Arora (2000)

Determining the Characteristics of Word Lists that Produce False Memories

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1999
Professor: Walter Chromiak


Barbara Wisniewska-Arora (2000)

Determining the Characteristics of False Memories

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1998
Professor: Walter Chromiak


Ashley Elizabeth Young (2007)

Corticosterone Levels in Chicks Given Social Isolation

Memory formation is subject to stress. Too little stress and not enough memory forms, but too much and memory is impaired. Studying memory formation under different levels of stress is important because it helps us understand how normal memories are formed and also allows us to find ways to improve memories when they are impaired. We can manipulate stress levels, for example, by giving social isolation. However, it is important to understand how this manipulation changes the levels of hormones of stress in the body. These studies will examine the levels of corticosterone (one of the hormones released during stress) in both control animals and animals given isolation stress. Understanding these hormonal changes will help us predict the effects of stress on memories, and, more importantly, allow us to predict how a little stress might improve memory.

Term Funded:Summer 2006
Professor: Teresa Barber


Kymberly Dawn Young (2005)

Chronic Bupropion and Nicotine Reward

In the United States, tobacco smoking is the number one cause of disease and preventable death, contributing to 40 diseases and 500,000 deaths a year. Several studies have shown that the antidepressant, bupropion (Zyban®), is an efficacious smoking-cessation agent. Its therapeutic mechanism of action, however, is unknown. The rewarding properties of nicotine are thought to contribute to its addictive potential. Previous research has shown that acute bupropion exposure facilitates a nicotine-conditioned place preference, suggesting that acute bupropion exposure enhances the rewarding properties of nicotine. When used therapeutically, however, bupropion is adminstered chronically. Thus, in order to more closely approximate the therapeutic use of bupropion, the present experiment will determine if chronic bupropion exposure enhances the rewarding properties of nicotine, as assessed using the conditioned place preference paradigm. The conditioned place preference paradigm is widely considered a good and reliable measure of a drug's rewarding properties. A better understanding of bupropion-nicotine interactions will help lead to greater knowledge regarding nicotine addiction and perhaps contribute to the development of novel, more efficacious smoking-cessation agents.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: Tony Rauhut


Wuji Zeng (2012)

NASA GCCE Grant: Estimated Savings from Smart Power Strips

Estimated Savings from Smart Power Strips

Term Funded:Spring 2011
Professor: Andy Skelton


Isaac James Zentner (2005)

Depression and nicotine dependence

Epidemiological and clinical studies have found a relationship between psychiatric illness and substance abuse. In particular, the prevalence rate of smoking is considerably higher in depressed individuals (46%) compared to the general population (26%). However, the reason for the high comorbidity of depression and smoking is unclear. To begin to understand the behavioral and neurobiological mechanisms that account for the comorbidity of depression and smoking, the present proposal, using an animal model of depression (Wistar Kyoto rats), will determine if Wistar Kyoto rats as assessed using the conditioned place preference paradigm. Because the sensitizing and rewarding properties of nicotine are thought to contribute to the addictive potential of nicotine, the finding of strain differences in the sensitizing and rewarding properties of nicotine may shed light on the nature of the relationship between depression and smoking.

Term Funded:Summer 2003
Professor: Tony Rauhut


Religion

Heather C Locke (1995)

Women and Religion: Trends in Publishing, 1974-1994

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1994
Professor: Mara Donaldson


Ryan Adam Meyers (2002)

n/a

n/a

Term Funded:Year 2000
Professor: Dan Cozort


Elizabeth Lansdell Nash (1995)

Transcription and Edition of an Early Shaker Manuscript

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Peggy Garrett


Rebecca Nicole Stanger (2009)

A Museum Exhibit on the History of the Jewish Deli

To prepare for an NEH-funded exhibit on Jewish foodways at the Jewish Museum of Maryland, the Dickinson student will catalog hundreds of items of deli and kosher provisions company memorabilia-neon signs, clocks, photos, menus, postcards, advertising material, and other ephemera. The student will do research to find out which decade each item derives from, based on typeface, food prices, telephone directory information, and other clues. The student will then photograph and enter each item into a special database used by museum professionals. By attending meetings with museum staff and scholars who are consulting on the exhibit, the student will also help to think conceptually about how to organize the exhibit, and help develop the "story" that the exhibit will tell about the Jewish deli, and, by extension, about the history of Jewish life in America during the past century. The deli part of the exhibit will eventually be turned into a stand-alone exhibit that will be lent to museums throughout the country.

Term Funded:Year 2009
Professor: Ted Merwin


Lara Mary Wulff (1994)

Gender and Autobiography: Life and Work of Dorothy Day and Annie Dillard

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1993
Professor: Mara Donaldson


Russian

Kirsten Leigh Brents (2015)

Russian Philosophy Journals: 1988-1999

During summer 2013 I will begin work on a project investigating the content of Russian philosophical journals from 1988-1999. Most generally, I am interested in the extent to which the subject matter of the journal articles and the editorial methodologies of the journals do or do not conform to Russian philosophical periodicals of the Putin era (the 2000s). I have chosen the period 1988-1999 because 1988 is the point at which the discipline of philosophy sees a dramatic increase in freedom of publishing and about 10 self-published, small print run journals appear; by 2000, Vladimir Putin has been elected to his first term as President and academic politics change along with this transition.

Term Funded:Spring 2013
Professor: Alyssa DeBlasio


Margaret Ann Browndorf (2008)

Editorial Assistant for Sirena: Poetry, Art, Criticism

The editorial board of Sirena, Dickinson's international journal of poetry, art and criticism, is seeking student assistance for a variety of tasks involved in the compiling and producing of the journal. Specifically, the student would be responsible for helping organize submissions, monitor and maintain general correspondence with both contributors and Johns Hopkins University Press, locating and contacting potential translators, preparing pages for layout, and copy-editing and proofreading the final copy before it is sent to press. In general, the assistantship will give the student broad exposure to the publishing industry. Literary publishing requires both critical acuity of creative writing and strong business skills, and this position will make the most of those abilities the student has developed through his or her courses and work experience for one of these aspects of the publishing field, while simultaneously giving him or her insight into the other.

Term Funded:Spring 2008
Professor: Christopher Lemelin


Cara Elizabeth Roney (2007)

Carlisle Area Homelessness and Income Density in Small Pennsylvania Towns

Dostoevsky anticipated and wrote compellingly about the complex issues of sexual psychology, gender relations, and the role of literary convention in the radically changing lives of women in his own time. He captured the practice of patterning one's behavior on literary texts in his great novels; consequently, in order to fully comprehend his views of women and the context in which he wrote, scholars need additional information about Russian society's attitudes toward women's reading practices. In French and English literary history, a substantial amount of research on women's reading has been published; however, this is not the case in Russian literature. Further investigation of this topic helps us to better understand contemporary concepts of gender and psychology, as Dostoevsky takes in the two-dimensional representation of women in Western literature, refines it, and returns it to the West through his own novels, eventually influencing people like Freud and Sartre. Our contemporary understanding of gender psychology was influenced by ideas Dostoevsky encountered in his own cultural milieu.

Term Funded:Year 2007
Professor: Eugenia Amditis


Sociology

Noorjahan Akbar (2014)

Metaphor and Meaning in Newly Chronic Illnesses

It isn't often that HIV/AIDS and cystic fibrosis are thought of as similar diseases. One remains a political hot-button topic and is spread through the transfer of bodily fluids, most often during sexual activity or the sharing of needles among illegal drug users. The other is a seemingly a-political disease that affects children and young adults and is transferred genetically. However, dramatic improvements in the diagnosis and treatment of these diseases have allowed those with one of them to live long beyond initial expectations. While this is good, celebratory accounts of these changes tend to overlook the health, social, psychological, and economic issues that those who are surviving confront. Oral history interviews have been conducted with more than 50 individuals living with one of these diseases. The Dana intern will transcribe about 10 of these (other transcriptions are complete) and will be using MAXQDA, a qualitative data analysis software, to code them. Particular interest will be given to the kinds of metaphors participants use in describing their lives in order to examine how they give meaning to their lives. Results will contribute to two papers to be submitted for publication - one on HIV/AIDS and its metaphors, the other on cystic fibrosis and its metaphors. Student co-authorship is likely on both. There is a longer-term goal of a book manuscript that compares the political, economic, and social lives of those living with these diseases.

Term Funded:Fall 2013
Professor: Dan Schubert


Lashana Dass-Koneswaran (2007)

Nature and the Contested Landscape: The Case of Trinidad

Ecotourism development has become a significant policy goal in many less developed nations. Ecotourism is usually described as tourism that is ecologically benign, culturally appropriate, and economically beneficial to local people. This ideal is rarely fulfilled in practice. For example, what does culturally appropriate mean? This project examines the cultural context of ecotourism in Trinidad, West Indies. The question of cultural impacts is addressed through interviews that examine how the experiences of village residents are organized in relation to both touristic and non-touristic uses of the landscape. By addressing local experiences of the landscape, these interviews capture a range of experiences that are missed when the focus remains on the tourism development process per se. The aim of the research activity proposed for the Dana funding period involves transcribing and analyzing the taped interviews, expanding and updating the relevant literature reviews, and writing two scholarly papers.

Term Funded:Spring 2006
Professor: Peter Grahame


Hannah Elizabeth Farda (2011)

book proposal and manuscript development for Bittersweet Homecomings: Identity Construction in the Korean Diaspora

While the importance of expressionism as arguably the most significant international artistic movement of the 20th century has been long established, the topic of literary expressionism in Russia is new and under-researched. The first and only significant study came out in Russian only last year; there are no substantial English language publications on literary expressionism in Russia. While the topic is related to my previous study on Mikhail Kuzmin, the newly published study opens additional research possibilities, including 1. The link between literary and artistic expressionism in Russia; 2. Expressionism's relationship to 19th century Russian literary tradition.

Term Funded:Spring 2011
Professor: Helene Lee


Ashley Claire Haywood (2007)

The Montserrat Diaspora in the United States and England

At its peak in the early 1990s, the Caribbean nation of Montserrat had a population of 12,000 people. A series of eruptions of the Soufrière Hills volcano in the next few years had devastating effects on the economy and culture of the island. The population dwindled to about 3,000, jobs were scarce, social bonds were broken, and communities were devastated. In January 2005 professors and students from Dickinson College visited Montserrat to study the sociological and geological effects of this disaster. Video-taped oral history interviews were conducted with 19 residents, and a video recording was made of a lecture of one of the leading intellectuals living on the island. While students who conducted the interviews transcribed what was recorded, no systematic coding of these interviews was performed. The student selected for this Dana Internship will develop such a code, do literature reviews on the disaster (as well as similar disasters, including the devastating tsunami of December 2004), work with the Professor to develop a research agenda for the time that he will spend in England interviewing the diasporic communities living there, perform interviews with members of the Montserratian diaspora currently living in New York, and write an outline of a paper on the effects of disaster-induced separation on romantic relationships.

Term Funded:Summer 2005
Professor: Dan Schubert


Jamie Yoonjoung Hur (2011)

book proposal and manuscript development for Bittersweet Homecomings: Identity Construction in the Korean Diaspora

While the importance of expressionism as arguably the most significant international artistic movement of the 20th century has been long established, the topic of literary expressionism in Russia is new and under-researched. The first and only significant study came out in Russian only last year; there are no substantial English language publications on literary expressionism in Russia. While the topic is related to my previous study on Mikhail Kuzmin, the newly published study opens additional research possibilities, including 1. The link between literary and artistic expressionism in Russia; 2. Expressionism's relationship to 19th century Russian literary tradition.

Term Funded:Spring 2011
Professor: Helene Lee


Savannah-Grace Anna-Lee Kate Leeman (2014)

Confronting Islamophobia: Longitudinal Trends among Advocacy Organizations

This research describes the changes that have taken place since 1980 among advocacy organizations that work to represent the interests of Arab, Muslim, Sikh, and South Asian American communities. These communities face discrimination in the form of hate crimes and polices that single them out for harassment. This project seeks to examine how advocates have developed strategies for confronting this discrimination. To answer this question, we will gather information on advocacy organizations that have been active since 1980, including founding dates, membership size, funding, and mission statements. This information will be put into a database that allows comparisons between organizations and across time, to look for patterns and changes in patterns based on the type of organization and the time frame in which these advocates do their work. By describing these changing patterns of advocacy work, we can offer new insights to sociologists that study social movement advocacy, race, and formal organizations.

Term Funded:Spring 2012
Professor: Erik Love


Rebecca E Marquis (1995)

Contemporary Problems and Issues Facing the Indigenous Peoples of Latin America

n/a

Term Funded:Summer 1994
Professor: Scott Van Jacob


Michele Amanda Metcalf (2016)

Carlisle Indian Industrial School Project

To develop a comprehensive digital resource for the study of the Carlisle Indian Industrial School (CIIS) by bringing together widely dispersed materials to aid research, and by serving as a virtual home for the ongoing work of an active CIIS community of memory and inquiry. The CIIS is a major site of memory for many Native peoples. The CIIS and the indigenous boarding school movement represent a very active area of research among scholars, teachers, students (both native and non-native), area residents, and descendants across the U.S. and the world. Scholars are working with descsendants of CIIS students who are learning from and contributing to this research. In the last decade, not only have many scholarly and popular books, articles, and documentaries related to the CIIS been produced, but also a number of symposia and community events have been organized. One example is the "Carlisle, PA: Site of Indigenous Histories, Memories, and Reclamations" Symposium held at Dickinson College in October 2012. This academic year's goals: • Make previously digitized materials accessible via a dedicated website utilizing appropriate content management tools. Intern will edit image files; will evaluate, decipher, interpret and describe file contents; will transcribe select information; and will upload files to online resource and enter appropriate metadata. See attached project description.

Term Funded:Fall 2013
Professor: Susan Rose


Katherine Eileen Murphy (2005)

A Comparative Study of Trans-Atlantic Migration and Oral Histories of the Oil Compnay Towns of Comodoro Rivadavia

In over 17 years of teaching Qualitative Field Methods, and the last 6 years of coordinating and co-teaching three Mosaics, I have amassed a number of resources for the teaching of fieldwork, including conducting interviews, oral histories, participant observation, and samples of published an student work. While I have developed various syllabi for these courses and programs, it is time to coordinate a Courseinfo/Blackboard site that could serve these endeavors and the next Mosaic which I am scheduled to be teaching during the fall of 2003, focusing on migration, community, family, and work studies. Dana Intern would help coordinate fieldwork resources for the American and International Mosaics, collected and construct a Courseinfo/Blackboard and web site that can serve the Mosaics and other fieldwork courses. In particular I will be working with the student to put together methods and research resources, web sites, printed articles, transcripts, etc. that will serve as a Methods bibliography for past and future Mosaics. This would require a student, working with me and contacting other faculty in order to: review what we already have as resources; to a literature review of other available resources, think about how to summarize and present them in the context of a bibliography; design a Courseinfo page of resources; design and construct a web page. The student will also help to conduct a literature review and annotated bibliography of the literature on Mexican migration, focusing on what would be useful to include for the next Mosaic that will take place in Adams County and Michocan, Mexico.

Term Funded:Fall 2002
Professor: Susan Rose


Margaret Theresa Murphy (2006)

Beyond Expectations: the Lives of Adults Living with Cystic Fibrosis

Until recently, people who had cystic fibrosis (CF) died as children. Recent medical advances have increased life expectancy to the point where today it is almost 33 years. What this means is that the first significant cohort of adults living with CF is now alive. I am involved in an ongoing study of these adults, having conducted a number of interviews in recent years and having had one article accepted for publication. This summer I will conduct additional interviews, transcribe those interviews, conduct data analysis, and write one paper titled "Living on the Cusp of Medical Advancement: The First Generation of Adults With Cystic Fibrosis" for submission to the journal Social Science and Medicine.

Term Funded:Summer 2004
Professor: J. Daniel Schubert


Oanh-Nhi Nguyen (2013)

Clothesline Project

Gender violence is a human rights and public health issue in both the developed and developing world. Violence against women is a pervasive problem that threatens the health and welfare of women. While acknowledging cultural differences, and striving for greater understanding of both "our" own and others' cultures, it is important to recognize and examine the social pathologies of violence and how they play out in their various forms and intensities within and across cultures. The Global Clothesline Project builds on previous work in an attempt to raise awareness about gender violence and to share strategies that are being used to prevent it. I am applying for a Dana assistant to help me this summer with editing over 50 hours of Clothesline interviews with women conducted in the U.S., Venezuela, the Netherlands, Bosnia, Cameroon - initially into a Clothesline Trailer of 10 minutes duration and then begin work on the Global Clothesline Documentary that will run approximately 53 mintues; to help translate the Cameroonian  interviews done in French and do English sub-titles; and to help film the Clothesline Project and susbequent oral history interviews I will be conducting in May with intertribal (Native American) groups in Sacramento.  Context:  I just had a conference call (2pm March 3, 2011) with an intertribal council in California and have arranged to do the Clothesline Project as part of their two-day training in Sacramento May 17-18th. I need someone to help me film interviews and if Oahn-Nhi were a Dana intern this summer, she could possibly apply for a CSC student research grant to fly out and do this work with me (if of course approved by CSC review committee). A number of things (2 & 3) have also just come up and I would love to be able to employ Oanh-Nhi as an as

Term Funded:Summer 2011
Professor: Susan Rose


Margaret Lee O'Brien (2011)

Intimate Racework: The Daily Lives of Lesbian, Gay, and Straight Interracial Couples

I am applying for a Summer Dana Research Assistant so that I may continue to make progress (the completion of two additional chapters) towards finishing my book manuscript, Intimate Racework: The Daily Lives of Lesbian, Gay, and Straight Interracial Couples. The book will be published by Oxford University Press and must be delivered to the press by December 1, 2010. Intimate Racework examines how individuals maintain intimate ties across systems of stratification. I use qualitative interviews with forty lesbian, gay and heterosexual Black-White couples to explore how interracial couples conceptualize and negotiate racial difference in their relationship. I challenge the widespread assumption that interracial intimacy represents the ultimate erasure of racial differences. While interracial partners may sometimes be more racially progressive than those who oppose intermarriage, they are not necessarily enlightened subjects who have managed to 'get beyond' race. Instead, for many partners in this study interracial intimacy represents not the end, but the beginning of a sustained process of negotiating racial differences.

Term Funded:Summer 2010
Professor: Amy Steinbugler


Margaret Lee O'Brien (2011)

Intimate Racework: The Daily Lives of Lesbian, Gay, and Straight Interracial Couples

I am applying for a Dana Research Assistant so that I may make significant progress (the completion of two chapters) towards finishing my book manuscript, Intimate Racework: The Daily Lives of Lesbian, Gay, and Straight Interracial Couples. The book will be published by Oxford University Press and must be delivered to the press by December 1, 2010. Intimate Racework examines how individuals maintain intimate ties across systems of stratification. I use qualitative interviews with forty lesbian, gay and heterosexual Black-White couples to explore how interracial couples conceptualize and negotiate racial difference in their relationship. I chall