Faculty Profile

Kelin Zhuang

LIASE Post-Doctoral Fellow in Earth Sciences and Environmental Studies (2013)

Contact Information

zhuangk@dickinson.edu

Kaufman Building Room 133

Education

  • B.S., Nanjing University-China, 1990
  • M.S., Ocean University of China, 1998
  • Ph.D., Texas A & M University, 2010

2014-2015 Academic Year

Spring 2015

EASN 206 Climate Chg, Rivers & Chin Soc
Cross-listed with ANTH 245-01, ENST 311-04 and ERSC 311-01. Permission of Instructor Required. This course is an interdisciplinary, globally integrated course that begins with a two-week field trip to North China in January 2015. Sites visited on the field trip introduce students to the geography of the Yellow River basin and sites of human habitation long the river's course, as well as some sites that help students understand China’s history more broadly. During the field trip portion of the course, students will create blogs and podcasts to post on a website based on their experiences in China. The course integrates climate change in East Asia and its geography with the history of populations that are identified with the Chinese state. The course focuses equally on 1) the impact of long term changes in the climate and land forms of the region, especially its large river systems, and 2) the consequences of human activity for environmental change as populations exploit natural environments, especially rivers, for livelihood, state revenues, and the market. Although the course is broadly historical, it includes case studies to illustrate in concrete detail critical aspects of longer-term trends, such as course shifts in the Yellow River, the role of irrigation in the formation of Chinese civilization, deforestation in North China, the Three Gorges Dam project, agricultural sustainability, and other important topics.

ANTH 245 Climate Chg, Rivers & Chin Soc
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01, ENST 311-04 and ERSC 311-01. Permission of Instructor Required. This course is an interdisciplinary, globally integrated course that begins with a two-week field trip to North China in January 2015. Sites visited on the field trip introduce students to the geography of the Yellow River basin and sites of human habitation long the river's course, as well as some sites that help students understand China’s history more broadly. During the field trip portion of the course, students will create blogs and podcasts to post on a website based on their experiences in China. The course integrates climate change in East Asia and its geography with the history of populations that are identified with the Chinese state. The course focuses equally on 1) the impact of long term changes in the climate and land forms of the region, especially its large river systems, and 2) the consequences of human activity for environmental change as populations exploit natural environments, especially rivers, for livelihood, state revenues, and the market. Although the course is broadly historical, it includes case studies to illustrate in concrete detail critical aspects of longer-term trends, such as course shifts in the Yellow River, the role of irrigation in the formation of Chinese civilization, deforestation in North China, the Three Gorges Dam project, agricultural sustainability, and other important topics.

ENST 311 Climate Chg, Rivers & Chin Soc
Cross-listed with ANTH 245-01, EASN 206-01 and ERSC 311-01. Permission of Instructor Required. This course is an interdisciplinary, globally integrated course that begins with a two-week field trip to North China in January 2015. Sites visited on the field trip introduce students to the geography of the Yellow River basin and sites of human habitation long the river's course, as well as some sites that help students understand China’s history more broadly. During the field trip portion of the course, students will create blogs and podcasts to post on a website based on their experiences in China. The course integrates climate change in East Asia and its geography with the history of populations that are identified with the Chinese state. The course focuses equally on 1) the impact of long term changes in the climate and land forms of the region, especially its large river systems, and 2) the consequences of human activity for environmental change as populations exploit natural environments, especially rivers, for livelihood, state revenues, and the market. Although the course is broadly historical, it includes case studies to illustrate in concrete detail critical aspects of longer-term trends, such as course shifts in the Yellow River, the role of irrigation in the formation of Chinese civilization, deforestation in North China, the Three Gorges Dam project, agricultural sustainability, and other important topics.

ERSC 311 Climate Chg, Rivers & Chin Soc
Cross-listed with ANTH 245-01, EASN 206-01 and ENST 311-04. Permission of Instructor Required. This course is an interdisciplinary, globally integrated course that begins with a two-week field trip to North China in January 2015. Sites visited on the field trip introduce students to the geography of the Yellow River basin and sites of human habitation long the river's course, as well as some sites that help students understand China’s history more broadly. During the field trip portion of the course, students will create blogs and podcasts to post on a website based on their experiences in China. The course integrates climate change in East Asia and its geography with the history of populations that are identified with the Chinese state. The course focuses equally on 1) the impact of long term changes in the climate and land forms of the region, especially its large river systems, and 2) the consequences of human activity for environmental change as populations exploit natural environments, especially rivers, for livelihood, state revenues, and the market. Although the course is broadly historical, it includes case studies to illustrate in concrete detail critical aspects of longer-term trends, such as course shifts in the Yellow River, the role of irrigation in the formation of Chinese civilization, deforestation in North China, the Three Gorges Dam project, agricultural sustainability, and other important topics.