Faculty Profile

Evan Young

Assistant Professor of History (2015)

Contact Information

youngw@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 102
717.254.8170

Bio

Professor Young teaches courses on the history of East Asia (China, Korea, and Japan), women's history and gender studies, and the history of medicine. His research interests include the history of early modern and modern Japan, the social and cultural history of medicine, and the integration of digital humanities in the classroom. He is currently working on a book manuscript tentatively titled, "Family Matters: Managing Illness in Early Modern Japan."

Education

  • B.A., St. Olaf College, 2005
  • Ph.D., Princeton University, 2015

2018-2019 Academic Year

Fall 2018

HIST 204 Intro Historical Methodology
Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.

EASN 206 History of Modern Japan
Cross-listed with HIST 215-02. This course explores two centuries of successive transformations that have restructured Japanese society. Key topics include Japan’s transition from a feudal to a capitalist regime, the expansion of the Japanese empire, the Second World War, the post-war “economic miracle,” and recent political and economic anxieties as well as hope for the future. We will examine a range of engrossing primary sources and thought-provoking secondary scholarship to understand how geopolitical strategies and economic booms and busts have affected the daily lives of people in Japan, East Asia, and the rest of the modern world.

HIST 215 History of Modern Japan
Cross-listed with EASN 206-03. This course explores two centuries of successive transformations that have restructured Japanese society. Key topics include Japan’s transition from a feudal to a capitalist regime, the expansion of the Japanese empire, the Second World War, the post-war “economic miracle,” and recent political and economic anxieties as well as hope for the future. We will examine a range of engrossing primary sources and thought-provoking secondary scholarship to understand how geopolitical strategies and economic booms and busts have affected the daily lives of people in Japan, East Asia, and the rest of the modern world.

HIST 500 Independent Study

Spring 2019

HIST 120 History of East Asia
This course explores the diverse and interrelated histories of the region currently composed of China, Korea, and Japan, over the past two thousand years. We begin by studying the technologies and systems of thought that came to be shared across East Asia, including written languages, philosophies of rule, and religions. Next, we examine periods of major upheaval and change, such as the rise of warrior governments, the Mongol conquests, and engagement with the West. The course concludes by tracing the rise and fall of the Japanese empire and the development of the modern nation states that we see today.

EASN 206 Medicine & The Body - E. Asia
Cross-listed with HIST 215-01. This course is an introduction to the history of medicine in East Asia. We will begin by exploring the theoretical and practical underpinnings of classical Chinese medicine, which was the foundation of healing practices in premodern China, Korea, and Japan. We will then move on to trace the introduction of modern bio-medicine and the eventual reemergence of "Traditional Chinese Medicine" as an alternative style of therapy in the 20th century. We will also consider a wide range of topics that have generated compelling intellectual dialogue, including the relationship between doctors and patients and between medicine and the state

HIST 215 Medicine & The Body - E. Asia
Cross-listed with EASN 206-02. This course is an introduction to the history of medicine in East Asia. We will begin by exploring the theoretical and practical underpinnings of classical Chinese medicine, which was the foundation of healing practices in premodern China, Korea, and Japan. We will then move on to trace the introduction of modern bio-medicine and the eventual reemergence of "Traditional Chinese Medicine" as an alternative style of therapy in the 20th century. We will also consider a wide range of topics that have generated compelling intellectual dialogue, including the relationship between doctors and patients and between medicine and the state

WGSS 302 Gend/Sex in Mod Japanese Hist
Cross-listed with EASN 306-01 and HIST 315-01. This course is an exploration of how sexuality and gender have been continually redefined and experienced throughout modern Japanese history. We will analyze the changes Japanese society underwent from the 19th century to the present, paying particular attention to transformations as well as continuities in eroticism, same-sex love, family structure, and gender roles. A key theme of the course is the socially-constructed nature of gender norms and how women and men frequently transgressed feminine and masculine ideals, a theme that we will explore through both primary sources in translation and secondary scholarship. Building upon in-class workshops and a series of short-essay assignments, the final goal of the course will be to produce a paper that analyzes the development of this new and exciting field of history.

EASN 306 Gend/Sex in Mod Japanese Hist
Cross-listed with HIST 315-01 and WGSS 302-01. This course is an exploration of how sexuality and gender have been continually redefined and experienced throughout modern Japanese history. We will analyze the changes Japanese society underwent from the 19th century to the present, paying particular attention to transformations as well as continuities in eroticism, same-sex love, family structure, and gender roles. A key theme of the course is the socially-constructed nature of gender norms and how women and men frequently transgressed feminine and masculine ideals, a theme that we will explore through both primary sources in translation and secondary scholarship. Building upon in-class workshops and a series of short-essay assignments, the final goal of the course will be to produce a paper that analyzes the development of this new and exciting field of history.

HIST 315 Gend/Sex in Mod Japanese Hist
Cross-listed with EASN 306-01 and WGSS 302-01. This course is an exploration of how sexuality and gender have been continually redefined and experienced throughout modern Japanese history. We will analyze the changes Japanese society underwent from the 19th century to the present, paying particular attention to transformations as well as continuities in eroticism, same-sex love, family structure, and gender roles. A key theme of the course is the socially-constructed nature of gender norms and how women and men frequently transgressed feminine and masculine ideals, a theme that we will explore through both primary sources in translation and secondary scholarship. Building upon in-class workshops and a series of short-essay assignments, the final goal of the course will be to produce a paper that analyzes the development of this new and exciting field of history.