Faculty Profile

Candi Wilderman

Professor of Environmental Science; Walter E. Beach '56 Distinguished Chair in Sustainability Studies (1974)

Contact Information

wilderma@dickinson.edu

Kaufman Building Room 121
717.245.1573

Bio

Her specialty is the study of freshwater systems with a focus on water quality. Her current research interests include: operational models for community-based research, watershed assessment and management, aquatic ecology, and Chesapeake Bay restoration and protection issues.

Education

  • B.S., Tufts University, 1968
  • M.A., Harvard University, 1969
  • Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University, 1984.

2014-2015 Academic Year

Spring 2015

ENST 311 Climate Change & Biodiversity
Cross-listed with BIOL 401-02. In this course, students and faculty will examine ecological and evolutionary principles as they pertain to biological conservation, historical patterns of natural extinction, and the current status and nature of the Holocene/Anthropocene extinction. We will focus on the nature of the evidence concerning the impact of recent climate change on biodiversity, including the contribution of citizen science. The impact on human communities and livelihoods will be discussed within the larger context of why it matters. Proposed designs for enhancing mitigation and adaptation strategies and for protecting and restoring ecosystem resilience will be studied. In addition to reading the literature and hosting guest speakers, students will each choose a case study to explore in depth through literature and primary research. Students will be responsible for sharing the results of their research in extended presentations which will include their own customized reading assignments and enhancement exercises. This course may count as a theme course in both the Environmental Science and Environmental Studies majors.

BIOL 401 Climate Change & Biodiversity
Cross-listed with ENST 311-02. In this course, students and faculty will examine ecological and evolutionary principles as they pertain to biological conservation, historical patterns of natural extinction, and the current status and nature of the Holocene/Anthropocene extinction. We will focus on the nature of the evidence concerning the impact of recent climate change on biodiversity, including the contribution of citizen science. The impact on human communities and livelihoods will be discussed within the larger context of why it matters. Proposed designs for enhancing mitigation and adaptation strategies and for protecting and restoring ecosystem resilience will be studied. In addition to reading the literature and hosting guest speakers, students will each choose a case study to explore in depth through literature and primary research. Students will be responsible for sharing the results of their research in extended presentations which will include their own customized reading assignments and enhancement exercises. This course may count as a theme course in both the Environmental Science and Environmental Studies majors.