Faculty Profile

Christine O'Neill

Visiting Lecturer in Chemistry (2011)

Contact Information

oneillc@dickinson.edu

Rector North Room 2312

Education

  • B.S., Shippensburg University, 1992
  • Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University, 1998

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

CHEM 111 Chemistry in the Kitchen
Do you know how much chemistry takes place in your kitchen? Why are some recipes altered for cooking at high altitudes? Can you substitute baking soda for baking powder in a recipe? This course will provide answers to these questions, by introducing you to chemical concepts such as: thermochemistry, electromagnetic radiation, chemical bonding, acid and bases, and intermolecular forces. These concepts will be illustrated by examining the foods you eat and the cooking methods used to prepare them. In the chemistry laboratory, the students will continue their study of these concepts and their applications.

CHEM 111 Chemistry in the Kitchen
Do you know how much chemistry takes place in your kitchen? Why are some recipes altered for cooking at high altitudes? Can you substitute baking soda for baking powder in a recipe? This course will provide answers to these questions, by introducing you to chemical concepts such as: thermochemistry, electromagnetic radiation, chemical bonding, acid and bases, and intermolecular forces. These concepts will be illustrated by examining the foods you eat and the cooking methods used to prepare them. In the chemistry laboratory, the students will continue their study of these concepts and their applications.

CHEM 131 General Chemistry I with Lab
Chemistry Placement Exam required for all incoming first-year and transfer students.

Spring 2015

CHEM 111 Chemistry in the Kitchen
Do you know how much chemistry takes place in your kitchen? Why are some recipes altered for cooking at high altitudes? Can you substitute baking soda for baking powder in a recipe? This course will provide answers to these questions, by introducing you to chemical concepts such as: thermochemistry, electromagnetic radiation, chemical bonding, acid and bases, and intermolecular forces. These concepts will be illustrated by examining the foods you eat and the cooking methods used to prepare them. In the chemistry laboratory, the students will continue their study of these concepts and their applications.

CHEM 111 Chemistry in the Kitchen
Do you know how much chemistry takes place in your kitchen? Why are some recipes altered for cooking at high altitudes? Can you substitute baking soda for baking powder in a recipe? This course will provide answers to these questions, by introducing you to chemical concepts such as: thermochemistry, electromagnetic radiation, chemical bonding, acid and bases, and intermolecular forces. These concepts will be illustrated by examining the foods you eat and the cooking methods used to prepare them. In the chemistry laboratory, the students will continue their study of these concepts and their applications.

CHEM 243 Modern Chemical Analysis
The theory of chemical equilibrium as it pertains to acid-base, metal-ligand, redox, and EDTA titrations. Topics such as experimental design, sampling, calibration strategies, standardization, and the optimization and validation of experimental results will be covered. Statistical analysis of data will also be included. This class is meant to aid students in developing both a sound knowledge of experimental protocols (i.e. How many samples do we need to collect? How do we extract our analyte from the matrix? How much sample must be extracted in order to obtain a measurable result? How do we measure what's present? and in the critical evaluation of experimental results (How much confidence do we have that our results are representative of the system under study?). Prerequisite: 132 or 141. This course fulfills the QR graduation requirement.