Faculty Profile

Edward McPhail

Associate Professor of Economics (1998)

Contact Information

mcphail@dickinson.edu

Althouse Hall Room 209
717.245.1264
http://users.dickinson.edu/~mcphail/

Education

  • B.A., Washington University, 1986
  • M.A., University of Virginia, 1989
  • Ph.D., University of Massachusetts-Amherst, 2001

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

ECON 112 Intro to Macroeconomics
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and QR graduation requirement.

ECON 112 Intro to Macroeconomics
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and QR graduation requirement.

ECON 314 Advanced Microeconomics
This course will cover advanced microeconomic topics. Examples are expected to be drawn from various literatures including: game theory, international trade, evolutionary game theory, behavioral economics, efficiency wage/contested exchange, neoclassical theory and others.

Spring 2015

ECON 373 History of Economic Thought
This course provides an appraisal of the origins and evolution of selected economic theories, primarily through the works of great economists of the past. Past economic works are analyzed in their theoretical and historical context. Prerequisites: 278 or permission of instructor.

ECON 496 "Neoliberalism"
Permission of Instructor Required. The aim of this course is to familiarize students with the formation and development of the economic ideas associated with “neoliberalism”. The Chicago school will play a prominent role and to a lesser extent its intellectual offshoots UCLA and UVA as we explore the origins and rise of “neoliberalism”. Topics include: economic planning, the welfare state, the economist as expert, a case study of the role of economists advising Pinochet’s Chile, modeling and assessing the theory of the “liberal dictator,” popular opponents of “neoliberalism,” academic opponents of “neoliberalism,” and others. Readings include the works of Milton Friedman, Ronald Coase, Frank Knight, Arnold Harberger, Armen Alchian, Harold Demsetz, Friedrich Hayek, and others. Particular attention will be paid to the views of Milton Friedman, his role as an economic advisor and his views of economic advocacy. Opponents of “neoliberalism” will include: the MIT school represented by Paul Samuelson and Robert Solow, the UMASS Amherst school represented by Samuel Bowles and Herbert Gintis, the Notre Dame school represented by Philip Mirowski’s “The Road from Mont Pelerin,”popular treatments such as Naomi Klein’s “The Shock Doctrine” and others.