Faculty Profile

Trent Masiki

Visiting Assistant Professor of Africana Studies (2017)

Contact Information

masikit@dickinson.edu

Althouse Hall Room G10

Bio

Trent Masiki received his Ph.D. and M.A. in Afro-American Studies from the University of Massachusetts-Amherst. He holds a B.S. in Computer Science from Southern University, an M.A. in English from Texas A&M University, and an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Emerson College. As a Fulbright U.S. Scholar, he taught expository writing and U.S. Literature in the English Department at the Universidad Autónoma de Chiriquí in Panama. His current book project, The Afroethnic Impulse and Renewal, examines how and why Afro-Latino authors use African American narrative strategies and cultural tropes to write themselves into the national archive of literary and cultural history in ways that redefine what it means and has meant to be an Afro-descendant in the U.S. Masiki’s future book project will focus on Cuba and Cubans in the African American cultural imagination from 1859 to 2017.

Education

  • B.S., Southern University at Baton Rouge, 1992
  • M.A., Texas A & M University, 1996
  • M.F.A., Emerson College, 2001
  • M.A., University of Massachusetts, Amherst, 2014
  • Ph.D., 2017

2017-2018 Academic Year

Fall 2017

ENGL 101 Afr Am Influences/Afr-Lat Lit
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03 and LALC 200-03.This course examines African American narrative strategies and cultural tropes in 20th and 21st century U.S. Afro-Latino memoirs and autobiographical fiction. The course highlights Afro-Latino agency, intercultural exchange, and cultural change and continuity. Students will learn about the relationships between panethnicity and ethnoracial identity formation among people of African descent in the U.S.

LALC 200 Afr Am Influences/Afr-Lat Lit
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03 and ENGL 101-08.This course examines African American narrative strategies and cultural tropes in 20th and 21st century U.S. Afro-Latino memoirs and autobiographical fiction. The course highlights Afro-Latino agency, intercultural exchange, and cultural change and continuity. Students will learn about the relationships between panethnicity and ethnoracial identity formation among people of African descent in the U.S.

AFST 220 Afr Am Influences/Afr-Lat Lit
Cross-listed with ENGL 101-08 and LALC 200-03.This course examines African American narrative strategies and cultural tropes in 20th and 21st century U.S. Afro-Latino memoirs and autobiographical fiction. The course highlights Afro-Latino agency, intercultural exchange, and cultural change and continuity. Students will learn about the relationships between panethnicity and ethnoracial identity formation among people of African descent in the U.S.

AFST 320 Afr Am Intellectual Discourse
This course focuses on "key debates in African American studies" by examining African American intellectual discourse from the era of U.S. slavery to the end of the Obama presidency. Students will explore major authors, genres, aesthetics, political movements, and intersectional tropes of the periods. The course examines how African Americans and their allies discursively challenged the arguments and institutions that supported slavery and that advocated for racial subordination in the post-emancipation era. The course emphasizes African American resistance, agency, and cultural change and continuity.

Spring 2018

AFST 100 Intro to Africana Studies
Cross-listed with LALC 121-01.

LALC 121 Intro to Africana Studies
Cross-listed with AFST 100-01.

AFST 220 Afr Am Influences/Afr-Lat Lit
Cross-listed with ENGL 222-02. This course examines African American narrative strategies and cultural tropes in U.S. Afro-Latino memoirs and autobiographical fiction. The course highlights Afro-Latino agency, resistance, endurance, intertextuality, and interracial alliances. Students will learn about the relationships between transculturation, panethnicity and ethnoracial identity formation in the U.S.

ENGL 222 Afr Am Influences/Afr-Lat Lit
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02. This course examines African American narrative strategies and cultural tropes in U.S. Afro-Latino memoirs and autobiographical fiction. The course highlights Afro-Latino agency, resistance, endurance, intertextuality, and interracial alliances. Students will learn about the relationships between transculturation, panethnicity and ethnoracial identity formation in the U.S.

LALC 300 Afr Am Cultural Eng w Cuba
Cross-listed with AFST 320-02. Part of Cuban Mini-Mosaic.This course examines the history and politics of African American travel to Cuba from 1859 to 1960. Imagined accounts of African American travel to Cuba begin with Martin R. Delany’s novel Blake (1859) while actual African American travel to Cuba goes back at least as far as the Spanish-American War of 1898 and has continued unabated ever since. The history of African American travel to Cuba includes figures like Booker T. Washington, Langston Hughes, Rayford Logan, Mary McLeod Bethune, Sue Bailey Thurman, W. E. B. Du Bois, Irene Diggs, Joe Louis, and Amiri Baraka. In addition to the readings, students will listen to various podcasts, songs, and guest lecturers and watch relevant videos, documentaries, and films. Participation in the May 21-28, 2018 trip to Cuba will be open to anyone taking this class. MetaMovments will be organizing the trip with a focus on developing an historical understanding of the African influence on Cuban culture and life over several Centuries; engaging with academics & historians, specializing in the multiple branches of Afro-Cuban ancestry: Yoruba, Congo, Arara, and Abakua, as well as strong Haitian & Jamaican traditions; and being immersed in the dance and music of the island, from the Afro-Cuban roots to the Salsa of today. Students will be have the opportunity to practice Afro-Cuban music and dance with groups like Raices Profundo. After engagement with the history and politics of African American cultural exchange with Cuba and Cubans from 1859 to 1960, students will be able to reflect on their own experiences while in Cuba.

AFST 320 Afr Am Cultural Eng w Cuba
Cross-listed with LALC 300-02.Part of the Cuban Mini-Mosaic.This course examines the history and politics of African American travel to Cuba from 1859 to 1960. Imagined accounts of African American travel to Cuba begin with Martin R. Delany’s novel Blake (1859) while actual African American travel to Cuba goes back at least as far as the Spanish-American War of 1898 and has continued unabated ever since. The history of African American travel to Cuba includes figures like Booker T. Washington, Langston Hughes, Rayford Logan, Mary McLeod Bethune, Sue Bailey Thurman, W. E. B. Du Bois, Irene Diggs, Joe Louis, and Amiri Baraka. In addition to the readings, students will listen to various podcasts, songs, and guest lecturers and watch relevant videos, documentaries, and films. Participation in the May 21-28, 2018 trip to Cuba will be open to anyone taking this class. MetaMovments will be organizing the trip with a focus on developing an historical understanding of the African influence on Cuban culture and life over several Centuries; engaging with academics & historians, specializing in the multiple branches of Afro-Cuban ancestry: Yoruba, Congo, Arara, and Abakua, as well as strong Haitian & Jamaican traditions; and being immersed in the dance and music of the island, from the Afro-Cuban roots to the Salsa of today. Students will be have the opportunity to practice Afro-Cuban music and dance with groups like Raices Profundo. After engagement with the history and politics of African American cultural exchange with Cuba and Cubans from 1859 to 1960, students will be able to reflect on their own experiences while in Cuba.