Faculty Profile

Emily Marshall

Assistant Professor of Economics (2015)

Contact Information

marshaem@dickinson.edu

Althouse Hall Room 114
717.245.1719

Education

  • B.A., Denison University, 2010
  • M.S., University of Kentucky, 2011
  • Ph.D., University of Kentucky, 2015

2017-2018 Academic Year

Fall 2017

ECON 112 Intro to Macroeconomics
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.

ECON 112 Intro to Macroeconomics
A study of the fundamentals of economic analysis and of basic economic institutions, with particular emphasis upon national output, employment, and price levels. The monetary and financial system is explored together with problems of economic stability. Monetary and fiscal policy procedures are analyzed and evaluated in light of the current economic climate. Special attention is given to the historical development of major economic institutions.Prerequisite: 111.

ECON 374 Econometrics
This course is a rigorous introduction to econometrics in which the tools of economic theory, mathematics, and statistical inference are applied to the analysis of economic data. We will study and apply multiple regression analysis to both cross-sectional and longitudinal (panel) data in order to familiarize students with the concepts of econometric modeling, estimation, prediction, and hypothesis testing. Students will conduct empirical research projects using Stata, or other statistical analysis software widely used in economics, to enable students to understand and apply the conventions of empirical research in economics, including: technical writing, reviewing existing literature, data collection and organization, and file management for complete transparency and reproducibility. Prerequisites: 268 or 278, and one college statistics course (MATH 121 or 225).

Spring 2018

ECON 496 Asset Price Bubbles/Fin Crises
Permission of Instructor Required. Asset price bubbles have been an important aspect of macroeconomic analysis for centuries. Modern macroeconomic theories and econometric techniques have allowed economists to better understand, predict, and analyze the causes and consequences of asset price inflation and the related short-run macroeconomic volatility. Recently, following the Great Recession, more research has been devoted the study of bubbles and financial crises. This course will begin by providing a historical perspective on asset price bubbles, both in the U.S. and abroad. The next part of the course will discuss the connection between macroeconomic phenomenon and financial markets, examine the transmission of bubbles and crashes to other sectors of the economy, and consider the potential for monetary and fiscal policy to slow asset price inflation and mitigate the negative effects of financial crises. The majority of this course will focus on the recent recession and end with a discussion of the possible impending bubbles, including automobile and student loans. Students will be expected to use both theoretical and empirical techniques to analyze asset markets. Students will read seminal academic journal articles related to financial markets, asset price bubbles, and subsequent recessions. Given the extensive nature of this topic, this course cover only a small portion of the material in this field, and students are encouraged to explore other related areas of interest through a semester-long research paper.

ECON 496 Asset Price Bubbles/Fin Crises
Permission of Instructor Required. Asset price bubbles have been an important aspect of macroeconomic analysis for centuries. Modern macroeconomic theories and econometric techniques have allowed economists to better understand, predict, and analyze the causes and consequences of asset price inflation and the related short-run macroeconomic volatility. Recently, following the Great Recession, more research has been devoted the study of bubbles and financial crises. This course will begin by providing a historical perspective on asset price bubbles, both in the U.S. and abroad. The next part of the course will discuss the connection between macroeconomic phenomenon and financial markets, examine the transmission of bubbles and crashes to other sectors of the economy, and consider the potential for monetary and fiscal policy to slow asset price inflation and mitigate the negative effects of financial crises. The majority of this course will focus on the recent recession and end with a discussion of the possible impending bubbles, including automobile and student loans. Students will be expected to use both theoretical and empirical techniques to analyze asset markets. Students will read seminal academic journal articles related to financial markets, asset price bubbles, and subsequent recessions. Given the extensive nature of this topic, this course cover only a small portion of the material in this field, and students are encouraged to explore other related areas of interest through a semester-long research paper.

ECON 500 Independent Study