Faculty Profile

Lonna Malmsheimer

Adjunct Faculty in Sociology (2015)

Contact Information

malmshei@dickinson.edu

239 W Louther St
717.245.1520

2014-2015 Academic Year

Spring 2015

WGST 300 Oral History: Gay Lesbian
Cross-listed with SOCI 313-01.This course is focused on collecting and recording the individual life stories of LGBT people in central Pennsylvania during the latter half of the twentieth and the first years of the twenty-first centuries. Life for LGBT Americans has changed substantially over the past 50 years. As recently as the 1960s, gay citizens could be and were arrested, incarcerated, and hospitalized (against their will) as either “sick,” “sinful” or “criminal.” Gays and lesbians were widely seen as a threat to the family, religion and law – to the American way of life. This social hatred and fear drove LGBT individuals to suppress their desires and hide their orientation. With the sexual revolution of the sixties and seventies, related movements for both women’s and gay liberation developed. LGBT people “came out” and sought to change not only this ideology, but also the laws and structures that institutionally enforced sexual and gender conformity. In this course, students will be trained in oral history methods and will collect the stories of LGBT residents in our area. These interviews will contribute to the developing archival project that is sponsored by the Central Pennsylvania LGBT Center (www.centralpalgbtcenter/lgbt-history-project) and the Dickinson College Archives. In addition to collecting oral histories, students will transcribe their interviews and share their findings in research papers and class presentations. Please note that in addition to scheduled course meetings, students will schedule and conduct off-campus interviews with residents of central Pennsylvania.

SOCI 313 Oral History: Gay Lesbian
Cross-listed with WGST 300-04.This course is focused on collecting and recording the individual life stories of LGBT people in central Pennsylvania during the latter half of the twentieth and the first years of the twenty-first centuries. Life for LGBT Americans has changed substantially over the past 50 years. As recently as the 1960s, gay citizens could be and were arrested, incarcerated, and hospitalized (against their will) as either “sick,” “sinful” or “criminal.” Gays and lesbians were widely seen as a threat to the family, religion and law – to the American way of life. This social hatred and fear drove LGBT individuals to suppress their desires and hide their orientation. With the sexual revolution of the sixties and seventies, related movements for both women’s and gay liberation developed. LGBT people “came out” and sought to change not only this ideology, but also the laws and structures that institutionally enforced sexual and gender conformity. In this course, students will be trained in oral history methods and will collect the stories of LGBT residents in our area. These interviews will contribute to the developing archival project that is sponsored by the Central Pennsylvania LGBT Center (www.centralpalgbtcenter/lgbt-history-project) and the Dickinson College Archives. In addition to collecting oral histories, students will transcribe their interviews and share their findings in research papers and class presentations. Please note that in addition to scheduled course meetings, students will schedule and conduct off-campus interviews with residents of central Pennsylvania.