Faculty Profile

Noriaki Hoshino

Visiting Assistant Professor of History (2014)

Contact Information

hoshinon@dickinson.edu

Denny Hall Room 306

Bio

Education

  • B.A., University of Tsukuba, Japan, 2001
  • M.A., University of Tokyo, 2004
  • Ph.D., Cornell University, 2014

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

EASN 206 Mod Japan in Transpacific Wrld
Cross-listed with HIST 215-02.Drawing on recent developments in postcolonial and transnational studies, this course explores various approaches to modern Japanese history from a transpacific perspective, in particular Japan’s relationship with the United States and other East Asian countries. Using a rich variety of materials such as novels, films, and essays, this course will examine the intellectual, cultural, and socioeconomic history of Japan from the late-nineteenth century to the present. Topics include Japanese migration to the United States, Japanese colonization of East Asia, African- American interest in racial issues within Asia, Japanese and Chinese intellectual discussions of modernity, American militarization in East Asia, and the circulation of Japanese subcultures abroad.

EASN 206 Imperial China
Cross-listed with HIST 215-01. In this class, you will learn about change and continuity in imperial China, from the third century BC through 1911. Over the course of this more than two thousand years, what we refer to as “China” changed a great deal politically, economically, socially, and even ecologically. We will explore many of these changes, while at the same timekeeping an eye on the continuities that continued to characterize this amazing place and people over the long term. Among the topics you can expect to learn about in this course are:•Who and what constituted “China” in different periods•How the geography and climate of China differ from place to place•How the imperial government was organized and how the ruling family established their legitimacy•How different forms of religion—including Daoism, Buddhism, the state cult and popular practices such as ancestor worship—developed and related to one another•How the Chinese empire interacted with the nomadic peoples and states on its borders•How the role and treatment of women in Chinese society changed, and what has remained the same

HIST 215 Imperial China
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01. In this class, you will learn about change and continuity in imperial China, from the third century BC through 1911. Over the course of this more than two thousand years, what we refer to as “China” changed a great deal politically, economically, socially, and even ecologically. We will explore many of these changes, while at the same timekeeping an eye on the continuities that continued to characterize this amazing place and people over the long term. Among the topics you can expect to learn about in this course are:•Who and what constituted “China” in different periods•How the geography and climate of China differ from place to place•How the imperial government was organized and how the ruling family established their legitimacy•How different forms of religion—including Daoism, Buddhism, the state cult and popular practices such as ancestor worship—developed and related to one another•How the Chinese empire interacted with the nomadic peoples and states on its borders•How the role and treatment of women in Chinese society changed, and what has remained the same

HIST 215 Mod Japan in Transpacific Wrld
Cross-listed with EASN 206-03.Drawing on recent developments in postcolonial and transnational studies, this course explores various approaches to modern Japanese history from a transpacific perspective, in particular Japan’s relationship with the United States and other East Asian countries. Using a rich variety of materials such as novels, films, and essays, this course will examine the intellectual, cultural, and socioeconomic history of Japan from the late-nineteenth century to the present. Topics include Japanese migration to the United States, Japanese colonization of East Asia, African- American interest in racial issues within Asia, Japanese and Chinese intellectual discussions of modernity, American militarization in East Asia, and the circulation of Japanese subcultures abroad.

Spring 2015

HIST 120 East Asia: China and Japan
Cross-listed with EASN 206-02.

EASN 206 East Asia: China and Japan
Cross-listed with HIST 120-01.

HIST 215 Intellectual History of Race
Selected areas and problems in comparative history. Suitable for beginning history students, majors, and non-majors.

EASN 306 War and Memory in East Asia
Cross-listed with HIST 315-01.

HIST 315 War and Memory in East Asia
Cross-listed with EASN 306-02.