Faculty Profile

Michael Beevers

Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies (2011)

Contact Information

beeversm@dickinson.edu

Kaufman Building Room 106

Bio

His interests include environmental policy, global environmental politics, environmental security, development, globalization, peacebuilding and African Politics. His current research examines environmental and natural resource governance in war-torn societies - with a particular focus on forests, diamonds and minerals in Liberia and Sierra Leone. He has worked as a research associate at Princeton University and as a consultant for the United Nations Environment Programme and World Resources Institute. He was also a Peace Corps volunteer in Niger.

Education

  • B.S., Western Illinois University, 1993
  • M.S., M.P.A., University of Washington, 2004
  • Ph.D., University of Maryland, 2011

2014-2015 Academic Year

Fall 2014

INST 290 Environment, Conflict & Peace
Cross-listed with ENST 311-08. Despite the fact that most of the world's seven billion people are living longer, consuming more and getting better educated, many people on the planet have paradoxically become much less secure due to the scale of consumption and pollution in today's carbon-based societies. Global environmental hanges - deforestation, losses of biodiversity, land degradation, the depletion of fish stocks, water pollution and scarcity, toxic contamination and climate change -- are felt worldwide and the sites of esource consumption are located a world away the sites of resource extraction. This course examines the two most prominent ways in which global environmental change undermines human security. First, we will focus on how environmental change may induce conflict because violent conflict is a powerful source of human insecurity. Second, we will examine the ways in which environmental change undermines human security by putting at risk people's basic needs, human rights and the things they value in order to lead dignified lives. Examining the links between environmental change and human security allows us to examine questions of human vulnerability, the dynamics of conflict, cooperation and peace, equity and justice and sustainable development. The class will engage with academic debates in the field along with practical, policy relevant information.

ENST 311 Environment, Conflict & Peace
Cross-listed with INST 290-06. Despite the fact that most of the world's seven billion people are living longer, consuming more and getting better educated, many people on the planet have paradoxically become much less secure due to the scale of consumption and pollution in today's carbon-based societies. Global environmental hanges - deforestation, losses of biodiversity, land degradation, the depletion of fish stocks, water pollution and scarcity, toxic contamination and climate change -- are felt worldwide and the sites of esource consumption are located a world away the sites of resource extraction. This course examines the two most prominent ways in which global environmental change undermines human security. First, we will focus on how environmental change may induce conflict because violent conflict is a powerful source of human insecurity. Second, we will examine the ways in which environmental change undermines human security by putting at risk people's basic needs, human rights and the things they value in order to lead dignified lives. Examining the links between environmental change and human security allows us to examine questions of human vulnerability, the dynamics of conflict, cooperation and peace, equity and justice and sustainable development. The class will engage with academic debates in the field along with practical, policy relevant information.

ENST 406 Understand Hum Place in Nature
This senior seminar course explores in-depth the complex interactions between humans and the natural world through multiple and overlapping disciplines and viewpoints. We will reflect on what we mean by the environment and nature, and explore how these powerful concepts and understandings have evolved and been given significance through science, religion, philosophy, history, ethics, culture, politics, race and gender. The course engages critically with topics that lie at the heart of current environmental debates, and provides for understanding on issues ranging from wilderness and species protection and rainforest "destruction" to social justice, policy, planning and the commodification of the natural world. This course is designed to help us (re)evaluate our place is nature, comprehend the search for sustainability and guide our future endeavors. It is required for environmental studies and science students and highly recommended for those in all disciplines with an interest in living sustainability.

ENST 550 Independent Research

Spring 2015

ENST 130 Int Env Sci: Energy/Waste/Hmn
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of environmental disruption and management where the application of natural science principles informs an understanding of human-environmental interaction. Emphasis will be on the study of energy procurement and use, waste management, and human population dynamics and environmental health. Field study includes travel to industrial, mining, and agribusiness sites. Laboratory work includes using public databases for documentation of toxic releases and human health effects; and the generation, measurement, and use of renewable energy resources. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered in Spring semester.

ENST 130 Int Env Sci: Energy/Waste/Hmn
An integrated, interdisciplinary study of environmental disruption and management where the application of natural science principles informs an understanding of human-environmental interaction. Emphasis will be on the study of energy procurement and use, waste management, and human population dynamics and environmental health. Field study includes travel to industrial, mining, and agribusiness sites. Laboratory work includes using public databases for documentation of toxic releases and human health effects; and the generation, measurement, and use of renewable energy resources. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. Offered in Spring semester.