Samuel G. Rose ’58 knows that it’s tough to put a price tag on equal opportunity. “One of the major problems in this country is making the playing field level for all people, especially urban youths,” he explains. “Everyone needs education so we can give everyone the same opportunities.”

That’s why the Washington, D.C., attorney and real-estate developer committed $200,000 in 2000 to establish the Samuel G. Rose ’58 Scholarship for economically disadvantaged students from urban areas which reduces recipients' student loans. During the next five years he added more than $5 million, and in September 2007, Rose, a Dickinson trustee emeritus and vice chair at the Smithsonian American Art Museum, committed another $5 million, for a total of $10 million. 

In 2012, he also established the Sam Rose ’58 and Julie Walters Prize at Dickinson College for Global Environmental Activism, which supports an annual residency for environmental experts and activistsˆ—ˆfrom the inaugural recipient Bill McKibben, founder of 350.org, to the 2015 recipient Mark Ruff˜alo, actor and organizer of Water Defense. “As I look around the world,” Rose says. “I think education is a good place to put your money.”

The Rose Scholarship recipients are chosen by a team of administrators who review grades, high-school class ranks, SAT scores and financial situations, and 82 Dickinsonians have directly benefited from his vision for a more inclusive society.

Contact the admissions office with any questions.

Read about nine Rose Scholar alumni and their journeys to Dickinson and beyond the limestone. 

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