This online policy content is provided as a resource for the students, faculty, staff, and administration of Dickinson College. Content is subject to change. Please contact the appropriate person or office to obtain the most current information.  

DRUG AND ALCOHOL POLICY

A.  STANDARDS OF CONDUCT

These standards of conduct apply to all members of the college community, including all students registered for one or more courses; all administrators, faculty, staff, and employees; and, all organizations recognized by the college.

Illicit Drugs

Dickinson College prohibits the unlawful manufacture, cultivation, possession, distribution, dispensation, and use of any drug by any member of the college community on any college-owned property, at any college activity or activity offered by an organization recognized by the college, or during any college-sponsored event or travel. The possession of unlawful drug paraphernalia is also prohibited.

Alcohol

Dickinson College prohibits the use, sale, provision, and distribution of alcohol, except as permitted by law, on any college-owned property, at any college activity or activity offered by an organization recognized by the college, or during any college-sponsored event or travel.  The following items and activities are also prohibited on any college-owned property, at any college activity or activity offered by an organization recognized by the college, or during any college-sponsored event or travel:  

Underage possession or consumption – A person under the legal drinking age may not possess, consumer, or be under the influence of alcohol.  

Drinking games – Any activity or game that promotes or encourages the consumption of large amounts of alcohol is prohibited, including but not limited to, activities such as beer pong, quarters, and flip cups.  

Alcohol Paraphernalia – The possession of materials used in drinking games or activities that promote or encourage the consumption of large amounts of alcohol is prohibited, including but not limited to beer pong tables, beer funnels, and beer bongs.  

Hosting Underage Guests – Students are prohibited from serving alcohol to underage guests and must have the service of alcohol monitored by a TIPS-trained bartender. If students under the legal drinking age are found to be in a location where alcohol is being consumed, the college will presume that the underage students are in the possession of and have been consuming alcohol.   

Public Intoxication – Creating a disturbance to any member of the college community, college officials, or law enforcement while under the influence of alcohol is prohibited.  

Hosting/Attending an Unregistered Event – Any event with alcohol and five (5) or more guests, in addition to the residents, must be registered.  Hosting or attending an unregistered event that is required to be registered is prohibited.

Large Volume Containers – Kegs, beer party balls, punch bowls, or other large volume containers of alcohol are prohibited unless pre-authorized by the Office of Campus Life.

Multiple Locations – Events or activities, whether formally or informally organized, which encourage persons to consume alcohol in three or more places or encourage the consumption of large amounts of alcohol are prohibited, including but not limited “Around the World” or “progressive” parties.

Other Dangerous Conduct – The consumption of quantities of alcohol or the sustained consumption of alcohol that interferes with a person’s participation in the college community and/or that pose a risk to the health or safety of students or others is prohibited.

Because issues around the use, misuse, and abuse of alcohol have an impact on the academic and social success of students, the college expects that students who are legally eligible to drink will use alcohol responsibly and in a manner that does not put underage students at risk.  Additionally, the host of any event at which alcohol is provided is responsible for complying with applicable laws and policies of the college.  The “host” is the person, persons, or organization who provides the food, beverages, or accommodations for any activity.  The college reserves the right to prohibit or restrict consumption of alcohol at certain events and in certain facilities.  

B.  COLLEGE DISCIPLINE

Dickinson College will impose disciplinary sanctions on members of the college community for violations of the College’s Standards of Conduct regarding drugs and alcohol.  Potential sanctions for violations of this policy include but are not limited to, warnings, assessment/treatment, suspension, expulsion, and discharge.  Violations involving the possession, use, distribution, manufacture, cultivation, or sale or drugs are of such a serious nature that they are likely to result in the suspension or expulsion of a student or the suspension or discharge of a college employee. 

Further information about the process for college discipline of students is available in the “Community Standards” portion of the Student Handbook.  Further information about the process for discipline of college employees is available in the Employee Handbook.

In addition to any college discipline, the college may refer any violation of this policy to law enforcement agencies for prosecution or other action.  The college will cooperate fully with law enforcement agencies regarding any unlawful conduct involving drugs or alcohol.  

C.  LEGAL SANCTIONS

A person who violates any law governing illicit drugs and alcohol is subject to criminal sanctions provided by law.  In addition, a student who is convicted of any offense under state or federal law involving the possession or sale of a controlled substance will not be eligible to receive certain kinds of financial aid.  (See “Suspension of Financial Aid Eligibility for Drug-Related Offenses” in the Student Handbook).  

A summary of the legal sanctions applicable under local, state, and federal laws for offenses involving drugs and alcohol is provided in the Appendix to this policy.  

D.  HEALTH RISKS

All drugs, including alcohol, present health risks.  Combining drugs and combining any drug with alcohol substantially increases health risks and may be fatal.  To promote awareness of these risks, the College provides the following summary of information about risks associated with alcohol and certain categories of drugs.  

Alcohol - Consumption of alcohol, even in low or moderate amounts, can significantly impair judgment, coordination, and mental functioning, including the ability to drive a vehicle.  Statistics show that alcohol use increases the incidence of aggressive acts and misbehavior, including sexual misconduct, fighting, spousal and child abuse, and vandalism.  Moderate to high doses impair higher mental functions, including a person’s ability to learn and remember information.  Very high doses cause respiratory depression and death.  Repeated use of alcohol can lead to dependence, which can cause permanent damage to organs and deterioration of a healthy lifestyle.   

Cannabis/Marijuana - The use of marijuana can result in slowed thinking and reaction time and impaired memory and balance.  Marijuana smokers can suffer from respiratory problems, including cough, chest congestion, and heightened risk of lung infections.  

Club Drugs/Ecstasy/Ketamine - Club drugs include a variety of psychoactive drugs that tend to be abused by young adults.  Many club drugs create a sedative effect that can be incapacitating.  Some club drugs cause amnesia, delirium, and anxiety.  Repeated use may be physically addicting, resulting in withdrawal effects.    

Cocaine - Cocaine is a powerfully addictive stimulant that produces potentially dangerous physical effects such as raising heart rate and blood pressure.  The use of cocaine can lead heart attack, stroke, and death.  Binge use of cocaine may lead to irritability, restlessness, anxiety, severe paranoia, and hallucinations.  

Hallucinogens/LSD/Peyote/PCP - Hallucinogens cause illusions, poor perception of time and distance, and profound distortions in a person’s perception of reality.  They can also cause rapid and intense emotional swings.  The effects of hallucinogens are highly variable and unpredictable.  Users may experience panic, despair, fear, paranoia, and loss of control.  PCP is an addictive hallucinogen.  PCP abusers may become violent or suicidal         

Opioids/Heroin - Opioids, including heroin and some prescribed pain medications, can result in drowsiness and respiratory depression.  Opioids present a high risk for addiction and uncontrollable drug-seeking.  Chronic opioid use leads to physical addiction and withdrawal symptoms can be severe, including muscle and bone pain, diarrhea and vomiting, cold flashes, and kicking movements.  Abuse of opioids is associated with fatal overdose, collapsed veins, and pulmonary difficulties.     

E.  EDUCATION AND COUNSELING

Dickinson College offers drug and alcohol education programs regularly.  Information about these programs is available at the Officer of the Dean of Students, Office of Student Leadership & Campus Engagement, the Wellness Center, and the Department of Human Resources.  

F.  ASSISTANCE, TREATMENT AND COMMUNITY RESOURCES

If a member of the college community has a concern about drug or alcohol use by any student, the person can contact the Wellness Center or the Office of Student Life.  If a member of the college community has a concern about drug or alcohol use by any employee, the person may contact the Employee Assistance Program or the Department of Human Resource Services.   Contact information for these offices and other assistance, treatment, and community resources are listed below.  


Emergency Assistance
On campus, call x1111 (717-245-1111)
Off-campus, call 911

Medical Treatment
Wellness Center – Health Services, call x 1835 (717-245-1835) – for students only
Carlisle Regional Medical Center Emergency Department, call 717-960-1695

Emotional Support
Wellness Center – Health Services, call x 1835 (717-245-1835) – for students only
Counseling Center, call x1485 (717-245-1485)  
Employee Assistance Program, call 717-243-1896 – for employees only 

Community Resources
Alcoholics Anonymous, call 717-249-6673
Holy Spirit Hospital Drug and Alcohol Services, call 717-763-2369
The LeTort Center (confidential treatment for addictions), call 717-243-9000


Appendix – Penalties for Alcohol and Drug Offenses


Pennsylvania Underage Drinking Law....................................................................................................................i

Pennsylvania DUI Law Grading and Sentencing Guide...........................................................................................ii

Criminal Penalties for Drug Crimes under PA Law..................................................................................................v

Criminal Penalties for Drug Trafficking Crimes in PA...............................................................................................vi

Federal Trafficking Penalties for Schedules I, II, III, IV, and V (except Marijuana)................................................vii

Federal Trafficking Penalties for Marijuana, Hashish and Hashish Oil, Schedule I Substances.............................viii



Pennsylvania Underage Drinking Law

A person under 21 who attempts to purchase, consume, or possess alcohol will be fined up to $500 on the first offense and $1,000 for each subsequent offense. The minor's driver's license may also be suspended for up to 90 days for the first offense and up to one year for the second offense.

Source:  18 Pa. C.S. § 6310.4, 18 Pa. C.S. § 6308



Pennsylvania Penalties for DUI

There are now three levels of DUI:

1. General Impairment (.08 to .099% BAC)
2. High BAC (.10 to .159% BAC)
3. Highest BAC (.16% and higher) 

Under the new DUI law minors, commercial drivers, school vehicle or bus drivers, and offenders involved in an accident that injures someone or causes property damage may be subject to the high BAC penalties even if their BAC is not in the high category. Offenders who refuse breath or chemical testing may be subject to the highest BAC penalties. The following charts show the penalties for each of the BAC categories:

General Impairment penalties (Undetermined BAC, .08 to .099% BAC)

No prior DUI offenses - ungraded misdemeanor
- up to 6 months probation
- $300 fine
- alcohol highway safety school
- treatment when ordered
1 prior DUI offense -ungraded misdemeanor
- 12 month license suspension
- 5 days to 6 months jail time
- $300 to $2,500 fine
- alcohol highway safety school
- treatment when ordered
- 1 year ignition interlock

2 or more prior DUI offenses - 2nd degree misdemeanor
- 12 month license suspension
- 10 days to 2 years prison
- $500 to $5,000 fine
- treatment when ordered
- 1 year ignition interlock 

The new law creates a higher set of penalties for those having higher BAC levels. It allows for treament at all levels, and requires alcohol highway safety school for all first and second time offenders. 

High BAC penalties (.10 to .159% BAC)

No prior DUI offenses ungraded misdemeanor 
- 12 month license suspension
- 48 hours to 6 months prison
- $500 to $5,000 fine
- alcohol highway safety school
- treatment when ordered
1 prior DUI offense ungraded misdemeanor 
- 12 month suspension
- 30 days to 6 months prison
- $750 to $5,000 fine
- alcohol highway safety school
- treatment when ordered
- 1 year ignition interlock
2 or more prior DUI offenses 1st degree misdemeanor
- 18 month license suspension
- 90 days to 5 years prison
- $1,500 to $10,000 fine
- treatment when ordered
- 1 year ignition interlock
3 or more prior DUI offenses 1st degree misdemeanor
- 18 month license suspension
- 1 to 5 years prison
- $1,500 to $10,000 fine
- treatment when ordered
- 1 year ignition interlock 


For those at the highest BAC levels, the new law has strict penalties, but also allows for treatment. This even-handed approach allows for individuals to receive counseling for their alcohol problem, while still penalizing those who choose to continue the dangerous practice of drinking and driving.

In addition, drivers under the influence of controlled substances and those who refuse breath or chemical testing are subject to the highest BAC category penalties.

Highest BAC penalties (.16% and higher) or Controlled Substance

No prior DUI offenses ungraded misdemeanor
- 12 month license suspension
- 72 hours to 6 months prison
- $1,000 to $5,000 fine
- alcohol highway safety school
- treatment when ordered
1 prior DUI offense 1st degree misdemeanor
- 18 month license suspension
- 90 days to 5 years prison
- $1,500 to $10,000 fine
- alcohol highway safety school
- treatment when ordered
- 1 year ignition interlock
2 or more prior DUI offenses - 1st degree misdemeanor 
- 1 to 5 years prison
- $2,500 to $10,000 fine
- treatment when ordered
- 1 year ignition interlock


Criminal Penalties for Drug Crimes under PA Law

The most commonly charged drug crimes in PA are listed below with their corresponding penalties:

Offense PA Statute Penalty Mandatory
Possession of a Controlled Substance 35 P.S. § 780-113(a)(16) 1st Offense - misdemeanor, up to 1 year in jail, maximum $5,000 fine, or both;
Possession of a Controlled Substance Subsequent Offense - misdemeanor, up to 3 years in jail, maximum $25,000 fine, or both
Manufacture, Delivering or Possession with Intent to Deliver Controlled Substances (PWID) 35 P.S. § 780-113(a)(30) Please see the Criminal Penalties for Drug Trafficking chart below. Mandatory Minimum Sentences for Drug Trafficking
Manufacture, Delivering or Possession with Intent to Deliver Controlled Substances (PWID) Mandatory Minimum Sentences for Drug Trafficking to Minors
Possession of a Small Amount of Marijuana 35 P.S. § 780-113(a)(31) Misdemeanor, up to 30 days in jail, maximum $500 fine, or both
Drug Paraphernalia 35 P.S. §780-113(a)(32) Misdemeanor, up to 1 year in jail, maximum $2,500 fine, or both
Criminal Use of a Communication Facility 18 Pa. C.S.A. § 7512 3rd degree felony, up to 7 years in jail, maximum $15,000 fine, or both
Obtaining a Controlled Substance by Fraud or Misrepresentation 35 P.S. § 780-113(12) Same penalties as PWID above, based on the drug at issue. See the Criminal Penalties for Drug Trafficking chart below.


Driver's License Suspension for Drug Crimes in Pennsylvania

There are certain criminal offenses in Pennsylvania that carry a suspension of your driver's license as part of the penalty for that criminal offense, including some non-driving-related criminal offenses. Some common examples of criminal offenses that carry license suspension as part of the penalty include any offense under the PA Controlled Substance, Drug, Device and Cosmetic Act. Suspension of your driver's license is part of a separate administrative proceeding handled by the PA Department of Transportation (PennDOT).



Criminal Penalties for Drug Trafficking Crimes in PA


The penalties listed below are for any person who violates Pennsylvania law under 35 P.S. 780-113(a)(12), 35 P.S. 780-113(a)(14), or 35 P.S. 780-113(a)(14) with respect to:

Drug Type Penalty
Schedule I or II which is a narcotic drug Felony, up to 15 years in jail, maximum $250,000 fine, or both, or such larger amount as is sufficient to exhaust the assets utilized in and the profits obtained from the illegal activity.
Specific Drugs or Amounts: 

 PCP; methamphetamine (meth), including its salts, isomers and salts of isomers; cocaine and its derivatives; and marijuana in excess of 1,000 pounds
Felony, up to 10 years in jail, maximum $100,000 fine, or both, or such larger amount as is sufficient to exhaust the assets utilized in and the profits obtained from the illegal activity.
Schedule I, II, or III not listed above Felony, up to 5 years in jail, maximum $15,000 fine, or both
Schedule IV Felony, up to 3 years in jail, maximum $10,000 fine, or both.
Schedule V Misdemeanor, up to 1 year in jail, maximum $5,000 fine, or both.


Mandatory Minimum Sentences for Drug Trafficking in PA

Pennsylvania law, specifically §7508 of the PA Crimes Code, addresses mandatory minimum sentences for drug trafficking crimes. Mandatory minimum sentences under PA law provide little flexibility upon conviction. There are also additional factors that may amplify or aggravate the sentencing in your case, such as possession of a firearm.

See Federal Trafficking Penalties