Spring 2016

  • African Studies 220-02:  Social Justice in the African American Imagination
  • Economics 496-02:  Political Economy of Health
  • International Business & Management 230-01:  International Organizational Behavior
  • International Business & Management 300-05:  Human Resources Management
  • Latin American, Latino & Caribbean Studies 251-01:  Latin American Government and Politics
  • Political Science 251-01:  Latin American Government and Politics
  • Psychology 165-01:  Psychopathology
  • Psychology 440-01:  Seminar in Social Psychology:  Intimate Partner Violence
  • Women's Gender Studies 300-04:  Seminar in Social Psychology:  Intimate Partner Violence

Fall 2015

  • Health 400-01:  Senior Seminar in Health Studies
  • Psychology 375-01:  Research Methods in Community Psychology
  • Spanish 239-01:  Spanish for the Health Professional 
  • FYS 16:  Images and Cultures:  A Current and Historic Look Through the Lens
  • FYS 39:  The Promise and Pitfall of the New Economy
  • FYS 49:  Community Service and Critical Thinking
  • SOCI 236-01:  Inequalities in the US

SPRING 2016 SERVICE LEARNING AND COMMUNITY BASED RESEARCH

African Studies 220-02:  Social Justice in the African American Imagination
Instructor:  Lynn Johnson

The current socio-political climate in the U.S. has fostered a new awareness of social justice within African American communities. Therefore, this course explores the meanings and importance of social justice, as African Americans grapple with issues of police brutality, incarceration, poverty, political subjectivity (voting rights), institutional and environmental racism, and food justice. In the process, we will evaluate modes of activism, from political campaigning and protest literature to #hashtag activism. Moreover, the course will incorporate experiential learning by working with community partners that are involved in social justice work.

Economics 496-02:  Political Economy of Health 
Instructor:  Mesude E Kongar

In a world of unprecedented wealth, the average life-expectancy in some parts of the world is 46 years. Almost 2 million children die each year because they lack access to clean water and adequate sanitation. 100 million women are not alive today due to unequal access to nutrition, care and economic resources. In the United States, infant mortality rates are significantly higher among African-Americans. What are the political and economic conditions which lead to these differences in well-being across and within nations? In this course, students will examine the relationships between health and political and economic conditions world populations face today. The emphasis throughout the course will be on how socioeconomic inequalities based on gender, race, class, sexual orientation, nationality and other social categories affect health and well-being outcomes. Students of this course will contribute to community health by participating in community-based research in collaboration with a community agency serving health and well-being needs in the Carlisle-Harrisburg area.

International Business & Management 230-01:  International Organizational Behavior
Instructor:  Steven J Riccio

This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course.

International Business & Management 300-05:  Human Resources Management
Instructor:  Steven J Riccio

Sustained organizational success is directly related to the effective management of human resources. Leaders widely acknowledge the challenges associated with developing this competency, particularly from a global perspective. This course will examine human resource practices that organizations face regularly while attempting to remain competitive in the current global economy. These include strategic initiatives such as:
• Human Resource Planning
• Employment Law
• Workplace Diversity
• Employee / Career Development
• Performance Management
• Compensation and Benefits
• Organizational Health and Wellness
• Global Human Resources
This course will be interactive providing students with real-life activities including case studies, assessments, and a variety of application exercises. It is important throughout the course to examine each topic from the perspective of a human resource professional and operational manager.
Learning Outcomes
After completing all of the required components of this course, students will be able to:
1. Identify the value of the human resource function within the organizational structure.
2. Recognize how a successful partnership between organizational management and human resources can yield an empowered, motivated workforce.
3. Give examples of harassment and discrimination in the workplace while appreciating the vital role supervisors must exercise within the organization.
4. Compare and contrast human resource management practices in the United States and other countries.
5. Outline techniques that support the recruitment and retention of a highly qualified, well-diverse workforce.
6. Design a compensation model that supports the strategic goals of an organization.
7. Determine appropriate methods to address employee relations issues from both a performance and legal perspective

Latin American, Latino & Caribbean Studies 251:01 
Latin American Government and Politics
Instructor:  J Mark Ruhl

Cross-Listed with POSC 251-01.  An introduction to the politics of contemporary Latin America. Emphasis is placed upon the varied political institutional responses to socio-economic change in the Americas. Major countries to be analyzed include Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Cuba. 

Political Science 251-01:  Latin American Government and Politics
Instructor:  J Mark Ruhl 

Cross-Listed with LALC 251-01.  An introduction to the politics of contemporary Latin America.  Emphasis is placed upon the varied political institutional responses to socio-economic change in the Americas.  Major countries to be analyzed include Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Cuba.

Psychology 165-01:  Psychopathology
Instructor:  Suman Ambwani

An introduction to various psychological disorders and techniques of diagnosis and treatment. Relevant for students who anticipate careers in medicine, law, and the social or psychological services. This course is a Health Studies elective.

Psychology 440-01:  Seminar in Social Psychology:  Intimate Partner Violence
Instructor:  Kiersten R Baughman

Cross-Listed with WGST 300-04.  Social psychology is the science of how people interact with, relate to, influence, and motivate one another. Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an area of research within social psychology that examines extreme aggressive actions that occur within the context of a romantic relationship. This course will expose students to in-depth scientific research in the area of IPV in order to more fully understand the nature of IPV, its many precursors, how and when it occurs, and ultimately offer some suggestions for interventions. Students in this seminar-based course will read original journal articles, critically evaluate empirical findings and in-class discussions, compose individual and group presentations, and collaborate very closely with a local non-profit agency working in the area of preventing and responding to IPV. Course work will address critical research questions that will directly impact both clients of the agency and the greater Carlisle community. Through this service-learning course, you will forge a lasting partnership with a local Carlisle agency while gaining a solid research background from which to understand and address the real problems faced by victims of IPV not only in Carlisle, but around the world.

Women's Gender Studies 300-04:  Seminar in Social Psychology:  Intimate Partner Violence
Instructor:  Kiersten R Baughman

Cross-Listed with PCYC 440-01. Social psychology is the science of how people interact with, relate to, influence, and motivate one another. Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an area of research within social psychology that examines extreme aggressive actions that occur within the context of a romantic relationship. This course will expose students to in-depth scientific research in the area of IPV in order to more fully understand the nature of IPV, its many precursors, how and when it occurs, and ultimately offer some suggestions for interventions. Students in this seminar-based course will read original journal articles, critically evaluate empirical findings and in-class discussions, compose individual and group presentations, and collaborate very closely with a local non-profit agency working in the area of preventing and responding to IPV. Course work will address critical research questions that will directly impact both clients of the agency and the greater Carlisle community. Through this service-learning course, you will forge a lasting partnership with a local Carlisle agency while gaining a solid research background from which to understand and address the real problems faced by victims of IPV not only in Carlisle, but around the world. 

FALL 2015 SERVICE LEARNING AND COMMUNITY BASED RESEARCH

HEALTH STUDIES 400-01: Senior Seminar in Health Studies
Instructor: David Sarcone

The Senior Seminar in Health Studies is an interdisciplinary, topics driven course, with specific foci dependent upon the specialization(s) of the instructor. Students will survey the relevant literatures of at least two disciplines; identify specific problems or topics; complete a research project based on secondary and/or primary sources; and offer a final presentation of interdisciplinary work (in the forms of academic papers, oral presentations, or some other creative project (including film, narrative, performance, etc.). Prerequisite: 201 and at least two other courses in Health Studies (as accepted by Health Studies Coordinator), or permission of instructor.  Normally offered fall semester.   

PSYCHOLOGY 371-01:  Research Methods in Community Psychology
Instructor: Sharon Kingston

This course will emphasize gaining advanced knowledge and skills in the research methodologies of community psychology, answering the question: How does community psychology seek to scientifically understand relationships between environmental conditions and the development of health and well-being of all members of a community? Students will gain and practice skills in consultation and evaluation of programs to facilitate psychological competence and empowerment, and prevent disorder. Specifically, students will: (a) consider ways to assess and be responsive to the needs of people from marginalized populations with diverse socio-cultural, educational, and ethnic backgrounds; (b) become familiar with innovative programs and practices geared towards prevention and empowerment of disenfranchised groups; (c) apply learning (of theory and research strategies) to a problem in the community; and (d) develop skills in collaborating with Carlisle-area community members in identifying, designing, implementing, and interpreting community-based research. Spring 2015  Service-Learning and Community-Based Research Courses.

SPANISH 239-01:  Spanish for the Health Professions
Instructor: Asuncion Arnedo-Aldrich

This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required.
Prerequisite: 116 and permission of instructor, or, 200 level placement, or 230. Offered every fall semester.  

FYS 16:  Images and Cultures:  A Current and Historic Look Through the Lens
Instructor: Andrew Bale, Art & Art History

This course will explore how we as a culture are moving away from written and verbal communication and reverting back to a purely image-based society.  As a class, we will discuss the importance of the photographic image and how it has shaped our culture since its invention in 1839.  Through a variety of readings, students will broaden their understanding of the photographic medium and its power to shape the future.  Students will read On Photography by Susan Sontag in which she takes an in-depth look at photographic images and how those images have shaped the way we look at the world and ourselves.  We will read Regarding the Pain of Others by Susan Sontag.  Here she takes a twentieth-century look at how photographs of war and violence change the way we think about images as well as the politics of suffering.  For a different perspective, we will read Beauty in Photography by Robert Adams who takes us on a journey in his defense of traditional values within the medium.  During the second half of the semester, you and your classmates will embark on a documentary-style, re-photographic survey of the historic Carlisle downtown using the archives at the Cumberland County Historical Society as a starting point.  By the end of the semester, we will produce a self-published book of our work.

FYS 39:  The Promise and Pitfall of the New Economy
Instructor:  Windsor Morgan, Physics & Astronomy

As we are witnessing the advent and extension of the new information and communication revolution, we are facing an uncertain future with both promises and pitfalls. This course will lead students to explore these promises and pitfalls through reading, writing, and research. The chief textbooks include The Second Machine Age by Erik Brynjolfsson and Andrew McAfee and The Price of Inequality: How Today’s Divided Society Endangered Our Future by the economic laureate Joseph E. Stiglitz.  In addition to reading, summarizing, discussing and debating the key issues raised by these texts, each student is required to conduct a sequenced semester-long research project pertaining to the central concerns of the courses. Students will have two field trips during the semester. One to the Amazon Distribution Center in Carlisle and another to Project Share in Carlisle.

FYS 49:  Community Service and Critical Thinking
Instructor:  Shalom Staub, Academic Affairs

This seminar is designed for students who have a passion for community service and a desire to learn about the issues facing the Carlisle community.  You will spend time working with a local non-profit organization, and meet local leaders who are working to alleviate poverty, reduce homelessness, provide nutritional food to people in need, and mitigate environmental harm to air and water—in short, efforts to build a sustainable local community.  At the same time, our seminar will read works that examine and even critique the idea of volunteer service. We will examine the religious and political context of community service, and explore alternative conceptual frameworks like social justice, community organizing and political activism.  Finally, we will examine the contemporary call to revitalize the civic purposes of higher education in such recent publications as Democracy’s Education: Public Work, Citizenship, & the Future of Colleges and Universities.  This seminar will launch your Dickinson experience as an engaged citizen.

SOCI 236-01:  Inequalities in the US
Instructor:  Anthony Barnum

This course takes a critical look at the layers of American society that shape, construct, and inhibit the basic pursuit for equality of opportunity. Students will be asked to examine how the three most fundamental elements of social stratification (race, class, gender) function both separately and in tandem to organize systems of inequality. The course uses theoretical and practical applications of stratification to evaluate how social constructions of difference influence the institutions and social policy. Additionally, class discussions will also consider how the forces of racism, sexism, and classism impact the attainment of basic needs, such as wages, health care and housing. Offered every year.