Fall 2016

  • French 300: Toulouse Colloquium (being taught in Toulouse, France)
  • Health Studies 400-01:  Senior Seminar in Health Studies
  • Health Studies 400-02:  Senior Seminar in Health Studies
  • Policy Management 401:01 - Policy Management Seminar
  • Psychology 375-01:  Research Methods in Community Psychology
  • Spanish 239-01:  Spanish for the Heath Professions
  • Sustainability 301-01:  Practicum in Sustainability:  Building Sustainable Communities

Spring 2016

  • Africana Studies 220-02:  Social Justice in the African American Imagination
  • Economics 496-02:  Political Economy of Health
  • Environmental Studies 311-02:/Sociology 230-05:  Environment & Society
  • History 211:03:  American Landscapes
  • International Business & Management 230-01:  International Organizational Behavior
  • International Business & Management 300-05:  Human Resources Management
  • Psychology 165-01:  Psychopathology
  • Psychology 440-01:  Seminar in Social Psychology:  Intimate Partner Violence
  • Sustainability 490:  Baird Honors Colloquim
  • Women's Gender Studies 300-04:  Seminar in Social Psychology:  Intimate Partner Violence


FALL 2016 SERVICE LEARNING AND COMMUNITY BASED RESEARCH

French 300:  Toulouse Colloquium
Instructor:  Sylvie Toux
An interdisciplinary colloquium focusing on the history and contemporary culture of the city of Toulouse. This course is composed of intensive written and oral language study, and introduction to French university methods of argumentation, visits of local museums and regional cities, and exploration of the various neighborhoods of Toulouse. This course is designed to acquaint students with the city and the region in which they will be spending the academic year.
One-half course credit. Offered every semester at the Dickinson Study Center in Toulouse.
Attributes: INST France Course

Health Studies 400-01: Senior Seminar in Health Studies
Instructor: Marie Helweg-Larsen
The course will take an interdisciplinary approach to understanding smoking and smoking cessation. We will examine the interaction of multiples causes of smoking such as economic, sociological, psychological, public health, economic, and biological perspectives on why people smoke and why they struggle to quit. We will also focus on the experiences of smokers of lower socio-economic status and the role of smoking in disparity in health.
 In this community-based research course students will work with our partner agency, Sadler Health, on surveying two groups of people in their clinic: people currently in a smoking cessation program and patients who smoke but are not currently interested in quitting. The students will work with Sadler Health to develop the specific questions and survey instruments, will assist in data collection, and enter and analyze the data. Students will use the results of these surveys to write a report which will include academic background information, the survey methodology used, the findings, and specific recommendations. The reports will inform decision making at Sadler Health.
 Learning goals:
• effective team building and collaboration
• professional conduct in communication and collaboration with a community partner
• high quality oral and written final reports suitable for a community partner
• interdisciplinary examination of smoking cessation attitudes (e.g., economic, sociological, psychological, public health, economic, and biological perspectives)
• skills associated with research including the development of hypotheses, selection of survey questions, data entry and analysis, and reporting of descriptive and inferential results

Health Studies 400-02:  Senior Seminar in Health Studies
Instructor:  Sharon Kingston
The course will take an interdisciplinary approach to understanding childhood obesity and nutritional status among children in the U.S. We will examine the interaction of multiple causes of child obesity including sociological, psychological, economic, business, public health and medical perspectives in order to understand how to prevent childhood obesity and improve children’s nutritional status. We will also examine structural inequality as a social determinant of poor health.
 In this community-based research course, students will work with our partner agency, Partnership for Better Health, on an evaluation of the availability of healthy options in children’s menu’s in non-chain restaurants in the Carlisle area. The class will use a variety of social science research methods to assess the quality of the current offerings, the barriers and facilitators faced by restaurant owners and chefs in offering healthy options and parents’ willingness and ability to get their children to eat healthy meals. Students will use the results of this evaluation to develop a set of recommendations to area restaurants. The Partnership for Better Health will then disseminate these recommendations and support local restaurants in adopting them.
 Learning goals:
• effective team building and collaboration
• professional conduct in communication and collaboration with a community partner
• high quality oral and written final reports suitable for a community partner
• interdisciplinary examination of childhood obesity (sociological, psychological, economic, business, public health, and medical perspectives)
• skills associated with research including content analysis, interview and survey research

Policy Management 401-01:  Policy Management Seminar
Instructor:  James M. Hoefler
This course will serve as a capstone experience for Policy Management majors. It will echo the key principles covered in the Foundations class, including an appreciation for (1) fluid interdisciplinarity, (2) the contingent nature of knowledge, (3) connections to the wider world beyond the college, (4) principle-based models of leadership, (5) the meaningful application of ethics, and (6) the role of stakeholder values in problem analysis and decision making processes. Emphasis will be placed on acclimating students to the processes of complex problem solving that exist in a variety of contexts, including the public, non-profit, and private sectors, as well as in various comparative cross-cultural settings. "Policy Management" majors conclude their academic study of the various frameworks, orientations, stakeholders, and value sets that exist in different policy contexts by completing a comprehensive, hands-on policy management exercise.

Psychology 375-01:  Research Methods in Community Psychology
Instructor: Sharon Kingston
This course will emphasize gaining advanced knowledge and skills in the research methodologies of community psychology, answering the question: How does community psychology seek to scientifically understand relationships between environmental conditions and the development of health and well-being of all members of a community? Students will gain and practice skills in consultation and evaluation of programs to facilitate psychological competence and empowerment, and prevent disorder. Specifically, students will: (a) consider ways to assess and be responsive to the needs of people from marginalized populations with diverse socio-cultural, educational, and ethnic backgrounds; (b) become familiar with innovative programs and practices geared towards prevention and empowerment of disenfranchised groups; (c) apply learning (of theory and research strategies) to a problem in the community; and (d) develop skills in collaborating with Carlisle-area community members in identifying, designing, implementing, and interpreting community-based research.

Spanish 239-01:  Spanish for the Health Professions
Instructor: Asuncion Arnedo-Aldrich
This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required.

Sustainability 301-01:  Practicum in Sustainability:  Building Sustainable Communities
Instructor:  Cornelius A. Leary
Many communities are embracing sustainability as a goal of community development, giving weight to social equity, economic security and ecological integrity as they work to build the capacity of their residents to improve the quality of their lives. In this practicum course we will explore different visions for sustainable communities, learn the goals, history and tools of community development in the United States, and gain competencies in using community development tools for building sustainable communities. These competencies will be developed, and conceptual knowledge reinforced, through a community-based research project that brings students, instructor and community partners together in research that is both useful to the community of greater Carlisle and of educational value to students and instructor.

SPRING 2016 SERVICE LEARNING AND COMMUNITY BASED RESEARCH

Africana Studies 220-02:  Social Justice in the African American Imagination
Instructor:  Lynn Johnson

The current socio-political climate in the U.S. has fostered a new awareness of social justice within African American communities. Therefore, this course explores the meanings and importance of social justice, as African Americans grapple with issues of police brutality, incarceration, poverty, political subjectivity (voting rights), institutional and environmental racism, and food justice. In the process, we will evaluate modes of activism, from political campaigning and protest literature to #hashtag activism. Moreover, the course will incorporate experiential learning by working with community partners that are involved in social justice work.

Economics 496-02:  Political Economy of Health 
Instructor:  Mesude E Kongar

In a world of unprecedented wealth, the average life-expectancy in some parts of the world is 46 years. Almost 2 million children die each year because they lack access to clean water and adequate sanitation. 100 million women are not alive today due to unequal access to nutrition, care and economic resources. In the United States, infant mortality rates are significantly higher among African-Americans. What are the political and economic conditions which lead to these differences in well-being across and within nations? In this course, students will examine the relationships between health and political and economic conditions world populations face today. The emphasis throughout the course will be on how socioeconomic inequalities based on gender, race, class, sexual orientation, nationality and other social categories affect health and well-being outcomes. Students of this course will contribute to community health by participating in community-based research in collaboration with a community agency serving health and well-being needs in the Carlisle-Harrisburg area.

Environmental Studies 311:02:  Environment & Society
Instructor: Heather Bedi

Cross-listed with SOCI 230-05. Society defines how collections of humans are organized around shared bonds including cultures, contexts, or identities. Margaret Mead famously warned, we wont have a society if we destroy the environment. This course aims to understand how society is intimately dependent on natural resources, and how human actions alter the environment. Drawing from social science methods, this class highlights how societies are intimately dependent on natural resources, and how human actions alter the environment. Students will examine how collections of humans experience, use, and change the environment. They will gain knowledge in social change, and how social movements and activists frame challenges. Concepts of development, justice, and power will be examined in relation to pressing environment and society challenges.

History 211-03:  American Landscapes
Instructor: Gregory Kaliss

This course will explore how Americans have historically conceived of, represented, created, and contested a wide range of American landscapes. From the Hudson River Valley to the Yosemite Valley, from Central Park to the World's Columbian Exposition, and many more noteworthy sites in between, this course will explore the history of artistic representations of landscapes, preservation campaigns, and landscape architecture and park design. By exploring the battles fought between groups over the use and "misuse" of public landscapes, students will also gain insights into the class, race and gender divides that affected individuals' relationships to the land.


International Business & Management 230-01:  International Organizational Behavior
Instructor:  Steven J Riccio

This course looks at how human systems function within the structure of the organization and how individual and group behaviors affect collective organizational culture and organizational effectiveness. Students study individual, interpersonal, and group processes; the relationship between attitudes and behavior; ethical decision-making; and the management of organizational conflict and change. Approaches for developing leadership, managing conflict, communicating effectively, enhancing efficiency, and encouraging organizational adaption to changing environments are explored. Examples taken from domestic and international organizations are used throughout the course.

International Business & Management 300-05:  Human Resources Management
Instructor:  Steven J Riccio

Sustained organizational success is directly related to the effective management of human resources. Leaders widely acknowledge the challenges associated with developing this competency, particularly from a global perspective. This course will examine human resource practices that organizations face regularly while attempting to remain competitive in the current global economy. These include strategic initiatives such as:
• Human Resource Planning
• Employment Law
• Workplace Diversity
• Employee / Career Development
• Performance Management
• Compensation and Benefits
• Organizational Health and Wellness
• Global Human Resources
This course will be interactive providing students with real-life activities including case studies, assessments, and a variety of application exercises. It is important throughout the course to examine each topic from the perspective of a human resource professional and operational manager.
Learning Outcomes
After completing all of the required components of this course, students will be able to:
1. Identify the value of the human resource function within the organizational structure.
2. Recognize how a successful partnership between organizational management and human resources can yield an empowered, motivated workforce.
3. Give examples of harassment and discrimination in the workplace while appreciating the vital role supervisors must exercise within the organization.
4. Compare and contrast human resource management practices in the United States and other countries.
5. Outline techniques that support the recruitment and retention of a highly qualified, well-diverse workforce.
6. Design a compensation model that supports the strategic goals of an organization.
7. Determine appropriate methods to address employee relations issues from both a performance and legal perspective

Psychology 165-01:  Psychopathology
Instructor:  Suman Ambwani

An introduction to various psychological disorders and techniques of diagnosis and treatment. Relevant for students who anticipate careers in medicine, law, and the social or psychological services. This course is a Health Studies elective.

Psychology 440-01:  Seminar in Social Psychology:  Intimate Partner Violence
Instructor:  Kiersten R Baughman

Cross-Listed with WGST 300-04.  Social psychology is the science of how people interact with, relate to, influence, and motivate one another. Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an area of research within social psychology that examines extreme aggressive actions that occur within the context of a romantic relationship. This course will expose students to in-depth scientific research in the area of IPV in order to more fully understand the nature of IPV, its many precursors, how and when it occurs, and ultimately offer some suggestions for interventions. Students in this seminar-based course will read original journal articles, critically evaluate empirical findings and in-class discussions, compose individual and group presentations, and collaborate very closely with a local non-profit agency working in the area of preventing and responding to IPV. Course work will address critical research questions that will directly impact both clients of the agency and the greater Carlisle community. Through this service-learning course, you will forge a lasting partnership with a local Carlisle agency while gaining a solid research background from which to understand and address the real problems faced by victims of IPV not only in Carlisle, but around the world.

Sustainability 490:  Baird Honors Colloquim
Instructor:  Cornelius Leary

Permission of Instructor Required. Students accepted into the Baird Sustainability Fellows program will explore questions about sustainability from a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives and build leadership and professional skills as agents of change. The specific assignments and content of the colloquium will be decided in concert with the admitted students. These may include conversations with invited scholars and practitioners, discussions of selected readings and public lectures, individual or collaborative projects, written essays, presentations of student research and service projects, student led class sessions, workshops, and field trips. Each student will create an electronic portfolio to document attainment of sustainability learning goals. The colloquium is a half-credit course that will meet for 90 minutes each week. Grading for the course will be credit/no credit. Students accepted into the Baird Sustainability Fellows program will explore questions about sustainability from a variety of disciplinary and interdisciplinary perspectives and build leadership and professional skills as agents of change. The specific assignments and content of the colloquium will be decided in concert with the admitted students. These may include conversations with invited scholars and practitioners, discussions of selected readings and public lectures, individual or collaborative projects, written essays, presentations of student research and service projects, student led class sessions, workshops, and field trips. Each student will create an electronic portfolio to document attainment of sustainability learning goals. The colloquium is a half-credit course that will meet for 90 minutes each week. Grading for the course will be credit/no credit.

Women's Gender Studies 300-04:  Seminar in Social Psychology:  Intimate Partner Violence
Instructor:  Kiersten R Baughman

Cross-Listed with PCYC 440-01. Social psychology is the science of how people interact with, relate to, influence, and motivate one another. Intimate partner violence (IPV) is an area of research within social psychology that examines extreme aggressive actions that occur within the context of a romantic relationship. This course will expose students to in-depth scientific research in the area of IPV in order to more fully understand the nature of IPV, its many precursors, how and when it occurs, and ultimately offer some suggestions for interventions. Students in this seminar-based course will read original journal articles, critically evaluate empirical findings and in-class discussions, compose individual and group presentations, and collaborate very closely with a local non-profit agency working in the area of preventing and responding to IPV. Course work will address critical research questions that will directly impact both clients of the agency and the greater Carlisle community. Through this service-learning course, you will forge a lasting partnership with a local Carlisle agency while gaining a solid research background from which to understand and address the real problems faced by victims of IPV not only in Carlisle, but around the world.