Fall 2018

  • COMP 491-01: Fall Senior Seminar
  • ENST 335-01:  Analysis and Management of the Aquatic Environment
  • HEST 400-01:  Senior Seminar in Health Studies
  • INBM 100-03:   Fundamentals of Business
  • INBM 100-02:   Fundamentals of Business
  • INBM 240-02:   Marketing in a Global Context
  • INBM 400-03:   Seminar in International Business Policy and Strategy
  • INBM 400-02:   Seminar in International Business Policy and Strategy
  • PSYC 320-01:  Research Methods in Health Psychology
  • SINE 400-01:  Senior Seminar in Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship
  • SOCI 313-03:  Building Sustainable Communities
  • SPAN 239-01: Spanish for the Health Professions
  • SUST 301-01: Building Sustainable Communities

Spring 2018

  • Biology 301-01:  Wildlife Ecology
  • Computer Science 492-01:  Spring Senior Seminar
  • Environmental Studies 311-01:  Food, Poverty and Place
  • History 204-01:  Introduction to Historical Methodology
  • International Business and Management 100-01:  Fundamentals of Business
  • International Business and Management 100-02:  Fundamentals of Business
  • International Business and Management 100-03:  Fundamentals of Business
  • International Business and Management 300-01:  Human Resources Management
  • International Business and Management 300-05:  Organizational Development and Training
  • International Business and Management 300-06:  Social Impact Through Communication and Storytelling
  • International Business and Management 400-01:  Seminar in International Business Policy and Strategy
  • International Business and Management 400-02:  Seminar in International Business Policy and Strategy
  • Physics 114-01:  Climate Change and Renewable Energies
  • Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship 201-01:  Introduction to Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship
  • Theatre and Dance 319-01:  Dramaturgy
  • Womens, Gender and Sexuality Studies 300-02: Research Methods in Gender and Sexuality 

Fall 2018 SERVICE LEARNING AND COMMUNITY BASED RESEARCH

 
Computer Science 491-01: Fall Senior Seminar
Instructor: Braught, Grant
 
Students define and begin a year-long project. Written and oral presentation of project progress reports will be required. Contemporary social, ethical, technical and philosophical issues in computer science will also be examined.
Prerequisite: Senior standing. Offered every fall.
 
Environmental Studies 335-01: Analysis and Management of the Aquatic Environment
Instructor: Strock, Kristin
 
An interdisciplinary study of the aquatic environment, with a focus on the groundwater and surface waters of the Chesapeake Bay drainage basin. This course provides a scientific introduction to the dynamics of rivers, lakes, wetlands, and estuarine systems as well as an appreciation of the complexity of the political and social issues involved in the sustainable use of these aquatic resources. Students conduct an original, cooperative, field-based research project on a local aquatic system that will involve extensive use of analytical laboratory and field equipment. Extended field trips to sample freshwater and estuarine systems and to observe existing resource management practices are conducted.   Three hours classroom and four hours laboratory a week. Prerequisite: 162.  Generally offered in the fall in a two-year alternating sequence with 340.
 
Health Studies 400-01: Senior Seminar in Health Studies
Instructor: Winchester, Margaret
 
The Senior Seminar in Health Studies is an interdisciplinary, topics driven course, with specific foci dependent upon the specialization(s) of the instructor. Students will survey the relevant literatures of at least two disciplines; identify specific problems or topics; complete a research project based on secondary and/or primary sources; and offer a final presentation of interdisciplinary work (in the forms of academic papers, oral presentations, or some other creative project (including film, narrative, performance, etc.).   Prerequisite: 201 and at least two other courses in Health Studies (as accepted by Health Studies Coordinator), or permission of instructor.Normally offered fall semester.
 
International Business & Management 100-03: Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: Ritchey, Sherry
 
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent.
This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
 
International Business & Management 100-02: Fundamentals of Business
Instructor: Riccio, Steven
 
This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent.
This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.
 
International Business & Management 240-02: Marketing in a Global Context
Instructor: Ritchey, Sherry
 
The primary objective of this course is to identify how companies identify and satisfy their customers' needs. Not only are the "4p's of marketing" covered (product, price, promotional programs like advertising and public relations, and place or distribution), but working with a specific semester-long case, you will learn how to manage an integrated marketing program. We will also examine other important aspects of marketing: market research, new product development, consumer behavior, ethics, competitive analysis and strategic planning, and marketing internationally and on the Internet. Field trips and videos are used to reinforce the ideas presented in the classroom.
Prerequisite: 100 or permission of the instructor. 110 is recommended but not required.
 
International Business & Management 400-03: Seminar in International Business Policy and Strategy
Instructor:  Sarcone, David
 
This capstone course focuses on the challenges associated with formulating strategy in multinational organizations. The course will examine multinational business decisions from the perspective of top managers who must develop strategies, deploy resources, and guide organizations that compete in a global environment. Major topics include foreign market entry strategies, motivation and challenges of internationalization, the analysis of international industries, building competitive advantage in global industries, and the role of the country manager. Case studies will be used to increase the student's understanding of the complexities of managing international business operations.
Prerequisite: Completion of at least four of the five 200-level courses (200, 220, 230, 240, 250). This course will not fulfill distribution requirement. 
 
International Business & Management 400-02: Seminar in International Business Policy and Strategy
Instructor:  Sarcone, David
 
This capstone course focuses on the challenges associated with formulating strategy in multinational organizations. The course will examine multinational business decisions from the perspective of top managers who must develop strategies, deploy resources, and guide organizations that compete in a global environment. Major topics include foreign market entry strategies, motivation and challenges of internationalization, the analysis of international industries, building competitive advantage in global industries, and the role of the country manager. Case studies will be used to increase the student's understanding of the complexities of managing international business operations.
Prerequisite: Completion of at least four of the five 200-level courses (200, 220, 230, 240, 250). This course will not fulfill distribution requirement. 
 
Psychology 320-01: Research Methods in Health Psychology
Instructor: Guardino, Christine
 
Health psychology is the study of psychological issues in health, illness and health care. In this course, students will learn about research methods used in health psychology and, more broadly, the scientific method. Health psychologists use many different methodologies including experimental methods in lab and field, quasi-experimental methods, and observational methods. We will discuss the application of these methods to health psychology research, as well as related topics of validity, measurement, and research ethics. This course will culminate in the design and implementation of an original research project in the area of health psychology.  Three hours classroom plus three hours laboratory a week.  Prerequisite: PSYC 120; PSYC 202 or PSYC 211.
 
Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship 400-01: Senior Seminar in Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Instructor: Takacs, C Helen
 
This capstone course builds on and integrates the key concepts of the introductory course in this certificate program by requiring students to reflect on, synthesize, and apply knowledge gained through their academic programs and experiential learning experiences. The focus will be on creating shared value, which simultaneously enriches social, ecological, and economic systems. Through exercises in strategy formulation and implementation, students will gain an appreciation for the challenges and rewards associated with conceiving and transforming innovative solutions into new products, services, and/or initiatives that change our world in meaningful ways. In imagining these pathways for success, we will also address the importance of compassionate leadership, tools that nurture vital social connections, and the power of our own agency.  offered every fall.
 
Sociology 313-03: Building Sustainable Communities
Instructor: Leary, Cornelius
 
Cross-listed with SUST 301-01.   Many communities are embracing sustainability as a goal of community development, giving weight to social equity, economic security and
ecological integrity as they work to build the capacity of their residents to improve the quality of their lives. In this practicum course we will
explore different visions for and characteristics of sustainable and resilient communities, examine approaches to sustainable community
development and learn about Carlisle as a case study. Student learning will be reinforced through a semester-long community-based team
research project that brings students, instructor and community partners together to address a community development issue of concern to
members of the Carlisle community.
 
Spanish 239-01: Spanish for the Health Professions
Instructor: Arnedo-Aldrich, Asuncion
 
This is a specialized course emphasizing Spanish language and culture as they relate to health and medicine. The course goal is written and oral communication and cultural fluency as they relate to Global Health Care, Food Security, Immigration, and the delivery of health-care services to Limited-English-Proficient, Hispanic patients. Off-campus volunteer work with native Spanish speakers is required. 
Prerequisite: 202 or above, or permission of instructor. This course is cross-listed as LALC 239.
 
Sustainability 301-01: Building Sustainable Communities
Instructor: Leary, Cornelius
 
Cross-listed with SOCI 313-03.   Many communities are embracing sustainability as a goal of community development, giving weight to social equity, economic security and
ecological integrity as they work to build the capacity of their residents to improve the quality of their lives. In this practicum course we will
explore different visions for and characteristics of sustainable and resilient communities, examine approaches to sustainable community
development and learn about Carlisle as a case study. Student learning will be reinforced through a semester-long community-based team
research project that brings students, instructor and community partners together to address a community development issue of concern to
members of the Carlisle community.
 
 

SPRING 2018 SERVICE LEARNING AND COMMUNITY BASED RESEARCH

Biology 301-01:  Wildlife Ecology
Instructor:  Harold Eugene Wingert

Wildlife Ecology is designed for majors in both Environmental Science and Biology. This course approaches ecology from the aspect of focusing on individual organisms and the role they play in their environment. Students will visit various habitats in Pennsylvania and view wildlife first hand. The texts are both place based focusing on Northeastern forests and Northeastern vernal ponds. These two ecosystems are intimately linked and the health of one influences the other. Students will have hands on labs with living organisms and investigate the roles each of these organisms play in the forest and vernal pool environment. A focus of the course will be how we must manage these ecosystems if they are to be enjoyed by our grandchildren. Both of these ecosystems are being changed by human ignorance and global climate change. We are at a “squeak point” in our ability to sustain these ecosystems. Only a complete understanding of their ecology and rapid action will sustain them for future generations. 

Computer Science 492-01:  Spring Senior Seminar
Instructor:  Grant William Braught

A continuation of the project begun in 491 culminating in a written thesis and public presentation. Additional contemporary issues in computer science may be considered. Prerequisite: 491. Offered every spring.

Environmental Studies 311-01:  Food, Poverty and Place
Instructor:  Heather CP Bedi

An interdisciplinary course on special environmental studies topics to be offered on the basis of faculty interest, need, and demand. Recent topics have included loss of biodiversity, sustainable agriculture, forests, air pollution, and climate change. 
No laboratory. Prerequisite: Dependent upon topic or permission of the instructor.

History 204-01:  Introduction to Historical Methodology
Instructor:  Jeremy R Ball

Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing.
Prerequisite: one previous course in history. 

International Business and Management 100-01:  Fundamentals of Business
Instructor:  Sherry Y Ritchey

This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.

International Business and Management 100-02:  Fundamentals of Business
Instructor:  Sherry Y Ritchey

This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.

International Business and Management 100-03:  Fundamentals of Buisness
Instructor:  C Helen Takacs

This course features an introductory focus on a wide range of business subjects including the following: business in a global environment; forms of business ownership including small businesses, partnerships, multinational and domestic corporations, joint ventures, and franchises; management decision making; ethics; marketing; accounting; management information systems; human resources; finance; business law; taxation; uses of the internet in business; and how all of the above are integrated into running a successful business. You will learn how a company gets ideas, develops products, raises money, makes its products, sells them and accounts for the money earned and spent. This course will not fulfill a distribution requirement.

International Business and Management 300-01:  Human Resources Management
Instructor:  Steven J Riccio

TAUGHT AS A GLOBALLY INTEGRATED COURSE Sustained organizational success is directly related to the effective management of human resources. Leaders widely acknowledge the challenges associated with developing this competency, particularly from a global perspective. This course will examine human resource practices that organizations face regularly while attempting to remain competitive in the current global economy. These include strategic initiatives such as: • Human Resource Planning • Employment Law • Workplace Diversity • Employee / Career Development • Performance Management • Compensation and Benefits • Organizational Health and Wellness • Global Human Resources This course will be interactive providing students with real-life activities including case studies, assessments, and a variety of application exercises. It is important throughout the course to examine each topic from the perspective of a human resource professional and operational manager. Learning Outcomes After completing all of the required components of this course, students will be able to: 1. Identify the value of the human resource function within the organizational structure. 2. Recognize how a successful partnership between organizational management and human resources can yield an empowered, motivated workforce. 3. Give examples of harassment and discrimination in the workplace while appreciating the vital role supervisors must exercise within the organization. 4. Compare and contrast human resource management practices in the United States and other countries. 5. Outline techniques that support the recruitment and retention of a highly qualified, well-diverse workforce. 6. Design a compensation model that supports the strategic goals of an organization. 7. Determine appropriate methods to address employee relations issues from both a performance and legal perspective.

International Business and Management 300-05:  Organizational Development and Training
Instructor:  Steven J Riccio

In this course, students will learn how to think strategically about how training and development aligns with a global business context. This includes identifying training and development needs through various assessment methods, analyzing jobs and tasks to determine training and development objectives, and Design effective training and development programs using different techniques and approaches. Through practical application, students will Implement a variety of different training and development activities including classroom and virtual spaces and evaluate the effectiveness and efficiency of training and development programs.

International Business and Management 300-06:  Social Impact Through Communication and Storytelling
Instructor:  Sherry Y Ritchey

Through the creation of storytelling students will develop social impact strategies for clients in both the non-profit and for-profit sections of our local community and national arenas focusing on healthcare, business, and community conflict areas. Students will learn to effectively incorporate non-violent communication into aspects of influence, negotiation, and imagery. By linking strategy with storytelling, a value proposition that drives purpose and provides profit can be communicated.

International Business and Management 400-01:  Seminar in International Business Policy and Strategy
Instructor:  David M Sarcone

This capstone course focuses on the challenges associated with formulating strategy in multinational organizations. The course will examine multinational business decisions from the perspective of top managers who must develop strategies, deploy resources, and guide organizations that compete in a global environment. Major topics include foreign market entry strategies, motivation and challenges of internationalization, the analysis of international industries, building competitive advantage in global industries, and the role of the country manager. Case studies will be used to increase the student's understanding of the complexities of managing international business operations. 
Prerequisite: Completion of at least four of the five 200-level courses (200, 220, 230, 240, 250). This course will not fulfill distribution requirement. 

International Business and Management 400-02:  Seminar in International Business Policy and Strategy
Instructor:  David M Sarcone

This capstone course focuses on the challenges associated with formulating strategy in multinational organizations. The course will examine multinational business decisions from the perspective of top managers who must develop strategies, deploy resources, and guide organizations that compete in a global environment. Major topics include foreign market entry strategies, motivation and challenges of internationalization, the analysis of international industries, building competitive advantage in global industries, and the role of the country manager. Case studies will be used to increase the student's understanding of the complexities of managing international business operations. 
Prerequisite: Completion of at least four of the five 200-level courses (200, 220, 230, 240, 250). This course will not fulfill distribution requirement. 

Physics 114-01:  Climate Change and Renewable Energies
Instructor:  Hans Pfister

An introduction to the physics of global climate change and a hands-on exposure to several types of renewable energy. The first third of this project-centered course introduces the basic physical principles of global climate change with a focus on radiative equilibrium, greenhouse effect, energy balance, and entropy. Since the energy sources of an energetically sustainable future will consist of renewable energies and possibly thermonuclear fusion energy, the remaining two thirds of the course is devoted to an exploration of wind turbines, solar concentrators, thermoelectric convertors, and photovoltaic systems.
This course will not count toward major requirements in physics. Offered every two years. 

Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship 201-01:  Introduction to Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship
Instructor:  Shalom D Staub

This course introduces students to the essential concepts, mindsets and skill sets associated with social entrepreneurship. We begin with an overview of the field of social entrepreneurship. We will then develop a conceptual foundation in systems thinking and the community capital framework. The former allows students to grasp the complexity of social and environmental issues by viewing these issues through the lens of systems theory. The latter recognizes multiple forms of capital that are essential to developing sustainable communities: natural, physical, economic, human, social, and cultural capital. Other course topics may include creativity, innovation, social justice, alternative approaches to economics and business, and sustainability. Through definitional readings, case studies and/or biographies, students gain an understanding of the power of social entrepreneurship to create shared value at the local, regional, and global level. This course serves as the introduction to the Certificate in Social Innovation and Entrepreneurship, but it is open to all students from all academic disciplines who wish to develop their own capacities to initiate meaningful change in our world.  offered every spring.

Theatre and Dance 319-01:  Dramaturgy
Instructor:  Karen E Kirkham

What is a dramaturgy? This course will answer that question through theoretical and applied investigations of dramatic texts in historical, literary, and performative contexts. Always keeping in sight the idea of theater as a collaborative production-focused art, students will practice research, text analysis, genres of writing for/about the theater and dramaturgical roles on various kinds and aspects of production. A dramaturgical casebook for a proposed play or department production will be the culminating assignment. Prerequisite: 101 or 201 or permission of instructor.

Womens, Gender and Sexuality Studies 300-02: Research Methods in Gender and Sexuality 
Instructor:  Megan R Yost

This course addresses the methodological principles underlying empirical psychological research on gender and sexuality. We will specifically consider qualitative methods as they are used within psychology. Because the study of gender in particular has been strongly guided by feminist theory, this course will focus on feminist epistemologies as related to social psychological research. Class and lab time will be spent developing the following skills: critical reading and analysis of published research, design of empirical research, data collection, and qualitative data analysis. This course will culminate in the design and implementation of an original research project in the area of psychology of gender or human sexuality.