Fall 2013

Thursday, August 29th
Welcome Back Math/CS Majors BBQ
Math & CS professors will grill hot dogs, hamburgers & veggie burgers as well as provide side dishes and desserts. Come out and join the fun!

Noon-1:00 p.m.
Rector Courtyard (Rain Location: Rector Atrium)
Lunch provided

Tuesday, September 10th
Samuel Kelly, CS Student
"Interning at a National Lab/Compass: Automatic Software Flaw Detection via Static Analysis"

Abstract: Dickinson Computer Science Senior Sam Kelly will discuss his summer experience interning at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, including some of the unique technologies, internships, and research opportunities that await science and math students at Livermore and the other sixteen U.S. Department of Energy national labs. (If you find global security, cutting edge scientific research, giant lasers, or super computers appealing, then this should be of interest.) Sam will also discuss his involvement with the ROSE compiler project, and specifically his work on Compass, a powerful extension for ROSE that leverages static analysis techniques to automatically detect flaws and security vulnerabilities in existing software source code.


Noon-1:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Thursday, September 19th

Edwin Padilla, Asir Saeed, Yutong Shang - Summer Research with Professor Wahls
"Dickinson College Farmdata"

Abstract: This project entailed the computerizing of the Dickinson College Farm database from its existing paper based data logging system into a fully functional web based application. Along with allowing user friendly data entry in the form of drop boxes and tabs, the system also generates reports on data to allow for better managing and planning of harvesting, seeding, sales etc.. Being a completely web based application, this website allows farmers to collect data from their on-field mobile device or even their cell phones. With computer applications playing an important role in everyday activities from sending messages through email to planning a workout on an app, this project tries to implement the natural computerization of life into farming, using the Dickinson College Farm as a working model.

Noon-1:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Friday, October 4th
Dr. Chris Cox, Clemson University
"Graduate Studies in the Mathematical Sciences Department at Clemson University"

The Department of Mathematical Sciences at Clemson University was a pioneer in integrating key areas of the mathematical sciences (algebra and discrete mathematics, applied analysis, computational mathematics, operations research, and probability and statistics) into a balanced program, emphasizing both teaching and research. 

The Department began a complete restructuring of its graduate programs in 1975, aided by the NSF grant Alternatives in Higher Education. In addition to constructing an applied master's program, geared to preparing graduates for nonacademic careers, the NSF grant also called for the development of a Ph.D. program that would build upon the breadth-and-depth philosophy of the M.S. degree. The resulting Ph.D. program was approved by the faculty in the spring of 1979.

In this presentation, we will provide a brief history of Clemson University, then describe the mathematical sciences MS and PhD degree programs, including criteria for admission and offers of financial aid.
Interesting study abroad opportunities that have resulted from faculty collaborations with overseas universities will be highlighted.

An overview of research areas in the department will be given, along with a sampling of student projects and dissertations as well as employment after graduation.


12:30-1:30 p.m.
Tome 117
Lunch provided

Tuesday, October 8th
Marc Besson, Math Student
"A Ceiling on the Span of Cyclical Directed Wheel Graph T-Colorings"

This talk covers the results of summer research into the spans of directed wheel graphs.  The T-Coloring problem was first introduced by Hale in his paper on Frequency Assignment, and is a special subset of the general graph coloring problem.  We use a T set which excludes every negative integer as well as excluding the R+1 positive integer.  Additionally, the exteriors of the wheels being studied are all cycles.  Coloring using this T-set, we can prove that the span of the coloring (the difference between the highest color used and the lowest color used) has a fixed ceiling depending on the value of R+1.  To be specific, the maximum span of a cyclic wheel graph is 2R+4.This ceiling may be lowered for specific graphs depending on the number of consecutive introverted vertices on the wheel and the number of consecutive extroverted vertices on the wheel.    The result we have obtained may be important wherever directed networks are present and interference is an issue, such as in radio frequency assignment.


Noon-1:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Tuesday, October 15th
Professor Dick Forrester and Laura Kilko
Career/Grad School/REU Talk

In this chat we discuss a wide variety of careers and opportunities for students majoring in mathematics and computer science. In addition, we will talk about graduate school options, internships, and REUs (Research Experience for Undergraduates). Specific information about our recent graduates will be provided.

Noon-1:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Thursday, October 24th

Tom Edgar, Assistant Professor of Mathematics at Pacific Lutheran University, Dickinson Alumni
"A Fascinating Connection between Number Theory and Combinatorics"

We introduce the study of Pascal's Triangle modulo a fixed integer. In particular, we will discuss famous,  yet relatively unknown, results due to Lucas and Kummer. Along the way, we will connect Pascal's Triangle to arithmetic in difference bases and to an interesting family of partial orders on the Natural numbers. In particular, we will see how these partial orders can describe Pascal's Triangle modulo a prime and how, in turn, both of these relate to countering the numbers of "carries" when doing arithmetic. These intertwined connections will then allow us to discuss, and somewhat fix, a problem that we will encounter in our initial investigation of Pascal's Triangle by introducing a new class of sequences and their corresponding generalized binomial coefficients. No prior knowledge of combinatorics or number theory is necessary but may be helpful.
Noon-1:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Tuesday, October 29th
Dr. Ed Amoroso, Senior Vice President & Chief Security Officer for AT&T Services
"Historical Perspective on Cyber Security"

An overview of the most important contributions in computer security over the past fifty years will be provided. The major contributors to computer security from academia, business, and government will be highlighted and brought to life through anecdotes and stories about their unusual lives and circumstances.

Noon-1:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided

Tuesday, November 12th
Rush Hour - Professor Jeff Forrester
"Collaborative Science at Dickinson College: Combining Mathematics and Microarrays to Elucidate Genetic Networks and Wage the War on Cancer"

The advent of multiplexed measurement technologies has yielded powerful new methods for studying cancer and other complex human disease and has altered the required toolsets for molecular research to include additional mathematical and computational skills. As part of an NSF-funded program at Dickinson, we have collected DNA microarray data from HL-60 cells (an AML model) undergoing differentiation therapy and clustered the differentially expressed genes by their temporal patterns of expression. In this talk we examine various computational and probabilistic techniques for elucidating the genetic control mechanisms involved in this cellular exit from the cancer state. Results will be discussed from the application of a Naïve Bayes Model used to predict gene expression patterns based on over-represented subsequences (motifs) in the gene promoters.

Noon-1:00 p.m.
Rector Lecture Room
Lunch provided

Thursday, November 21st
Olivia Wilkins '15, NRA Internship
"Life in the Quiet Zone: Living in Green Bank and the Research Experience"

"Life in the Quiet Zone" discusses the experiences associated with living in the National Radio Quiet Zone (NRQZ), home to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO). It also describes the bridges among science disciplines in a research field that is comprised primarily of physics, astronomy, and engineering students from large research universities. It delves into the specifics of a research assistant project at NRAO - HI absorption against pulsars - which focused on calculating the distance between our solar system and neutral hydrogen gas in the Milky Way. The goal of this research was to determine the source of turbulence within the galaxy by exploring various factors, including star formation and the rotation of the galaxy, which was done using Robert C. Byrd Green Bank Telescope (GBT) - the largest fully-steerable radio telescope in the world.

Noon-1:00 p.m.
Tome 115
Lunch provided