Department Chair
Nitsa Kann
Associate Professor of Judaic Studies (2005).
East College Room 208
kannn@dickinson.edu
(717) 254-8977
Department Faculty
Mara E. Donaldson
(on sabbatical Spring 2015)
Professor of Religion (1990).
East College Room 207
(717) 245-1228 | donaldsm@dickinson.edu
B.A., Wilson College, 1971; M.A., Vanderbilt University, 1974; Ph.D., Emory University, 1984.
Dickinson Award for Distinguished Teaching, 1998-1999. Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, 2000-2001.

Her teaching focuses on contemporary religious thought, especially feminist and liberation theologies, and religion and art, including contemporary fantasy literature, film, and popular culture.
Daniel G. Cozort
(on sabbatical Spring 2015)
Associate Professor of Religion (1988).
East College Room 206
(717) 254-8972 | cozort@dickinson.edu
B.A., Brown University, 1976; M.A., University of Virginia, 1983; Ph.D., 1989.
Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, 2011-12.

Dan Cozort grew up in North Dakota, where he ran cross-country and track and was a successful debater and extemporaneous speaker. At Brown University he majored in religious studies, specializing in Christian theology and ethics. At the graduate school of the University of Virginia, he specialized in Buddhism, learned Tibetan and Sanskrit, and began his collaboration with Tibetan lamas. He did a year of fieldwork in India, traveling broadly and staying in Tibetan monasteries. His teaching career began with a two-year appointment at Bates College in Maine. Coming to Dickinson in 1988, he proposed that the College join the South India Term Abroad consortium, which he directed in Madurai, south India, in 1992-93. In 1991 he organized the Festival of Tibet at Dickinson, which included an art exhibit he curated and was the initial occasion in which Tibetan monks constructed a Buddhist sand painting in the Trout Gallery. The monks returned in 1995 to construct another; he collaborated with Prof. Lonna Malmsheimer on a film to document it. In 2000 he began to teach in the Norwich Humanities Programme in England and in 2003-2005 he was its resident director. Prof. Cozort's teaching is principally in the area of comparative religion, where he offers courses on Buddhism and Hinduism. However, he has also taught about Native American religions, about love and sex in relation to religion, about happiness, and has taught a variety of courses in the theory of religious studies. Currently, in addition to introductory courses, he frequently offers “Contemplative Practices in Asia,” “Buddhism and the Environment,” and “Spiritual Dimensions of Healing,” a course on the relation of religion and medicine. He is the author of six books: Highest Yoga tantra, Buddhist Philosophy, Unique Tenets of the Middle Way Consequence School, Sand Mandala of Vajrabhairava, Sadhana of Mahakala, and Enlightenment Through Imagination. He has also written numerous book chapters and articles and a film script. Since 2006, he has been the Editor of the Journal of Buddhist Ethics, and he is currently editing the Oxford Handbook of Buddhist Ethics.
Theodore Pulcini
Thomas Bowman Professor of Religion and Philosophy (1995).
East College Room 203A
(717) 245-1208 | pulcini@dickinson.edu
B.A., Harvard College, 1976; M.A., University of Notre Dame, 1979; Th.M., Harvard Divinity School, 1982; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1994.
Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, 1998-1999; Dickinson Award for Distinguished Teaching, 2002-03.

His teaching responsibilities focus on exploring the Biblical texts in their historical, social, and comparative contexts. He also specializes in Islam, early Christianity, and Eastern Orthodox Christianity. Research interests include relations between Islam and Christianity, both past and present.
Andrea B. Lieber
Associate Professor of Religion, Sophia Ava Asbell Chair in Judaic Studies (1998).
East College Room 106
(717) 245-1482 | lieber@dickinson.edu
B.A., Vassar College, 1989; M.A., Columbia University, 1993; M.Phil., 1995; Ph.D., 1998.

Her courses explore the transformations of Judaism as a living religion and evolving culture from its origins in antiquity through its varied manifestations in the 20th century. Special interests include: Judaism and early Christianity, Jewish mysticism (kabbalah), women and gender in Jewish tradition.
Nitsa Kann
Associate Professor of Judaic Studies (2005).
East College Room 208
(717) 254-8977 | kannn@dickinson.edu
B.A., Hebrew University, 1982; M.A., University of California at Berkeley, 1984; Ph.D., 2005.

Her teaching interests include Hebrew language, Hebrew Literature, Kabbalah, and Middle Eastern Cinema. She is the author of two Hebrew books of poems, 'Black Soul Singer' (1989), and 'A Woman With Child' (1992), and the author of two Hebrew novels, 'Gazelle of Love' (1995), and 'Herotica' (1998).
Edward P. Merwin
Part-time Associate Professor of Religion; Director of The Milton B. Asbell Center for Jewish Life(2001).
Asbell Center
(717) 245-1636 | merwin@dickinson.edu
B.A., Amherst College, 1990; M.A., Hunter College of the City University of New York, 1998; Ph.D., 2002.

His teaching interests are in American Jewish history and popular culture, with a particular focus on the Lower East Side and Yiddish culture. His current research centers on Jewish-themed Broadway plays, and on the history of the Jewish deli in America.
Contributing Faculty
David D. Commins
(on sabbatical Spring 2015)
Professor of History, Benjamin Rush Chair in the Liberal Arts and Sciences (1987).
Denny Hall Room 205
commins@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of California at Berkeley, 1976; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1985.

His teaching interests are in modern Middle Eastern history with an emphasis on Islamic thought and political movements. His most recent book is The Gulf States: A Modern History. A new publication, Islam in Saudi Arabia, will be available later in 2014. His other books are The Wahhabi Mission and Saudi Arabia, Historical Dictionary of Syria, and Islamic Reform.
Shalom D. Staub
Associate Provost for Academic Affairs (2004).
West College (Old West) 2nd Floor
(717) 254-8917 | staubs@dickinson.edu
B.A., Wesleyan University, 1977; M.A., 1978; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1985.

His research and teaching interests focus on 1) various dimensions of conflict analysis, conflict resolution and peacemaking, and 2) the ethnography of religious experience, including “folk” religion, religion and conflict, and the intersection of religion with race, ethnicity, and gender. These interests play out in his courses on conflict and conflict resolution studies, religion and conflict, ethnography of Jewish experience, folk religious practices in the Middle East and North Africa, and immigration and religious diversity in the US.