Major

11 courses.

Required Courses:

JPNS 211, 212 or CHIN 211, 212 (or equivalent)
EASN 101
One course that focuses on an East Asian country that is not the focus of language study
One EASN 300-level Colloquium
EASN 490 (senior research)

Electives:

1. Three humanities courses focusing on East Asia (including one literature course)
EASN 201
EASN 202
EASN 203
EASN 205
EASN 305
ARTH 208
ARTH 210
RELG 130
RELG 230
RELG 330
PHIL 246

2. Three social science courses focusing on East Asia
EASN 206
EASN 207
EASN 208
EASN 306
EASN 259
ANTH 232
COCV 105 (when topic is relevant)
HIST 120
HIST 361
HIST 215 (when topic is relevant
HIST 404 (when topic is relevant)
INBM 200
INBM 300 (when topic is relevant)
LAWP 259
POSC 190 (when topic is relevant)
POSC 254
POSC 255
POSC 259
POSC 290 (when topic is relevant)
Other courses on Asia with departmental consent

NOTE: Two upper-level language courses (JPNS 231/232; CHIN 231/232) may be substituted for one elective from the humanities (but not literature) and one elective from the social sciences.

Minor

Six courses including two language courses in Japanese or Chinese beyond the 100-level and at least four other East Asian courses, one of which could be an advanced language course. Students already proficient in Chinese or Japanese through the 232-level must take, as at least one of their six courses, a language course appropriate to level of proficiency. In addition, and for all students, one of the six courses should be either EASN 101 or a course that includes the country that is not the focus of language study

Suggested curricular flow through the major

The EAS major is designed to ensure a strong foundation in East Asian languages and cultures for on-campus course work and study abroad. To that end, at least four semesters of either Chinese or Japanese (through CHIN 212 or JPNS 212) is required. Students who enter the college with prior instruction in or knowledge of Chinese or Japanese may test out of this requirement or enroll in higher level language courses suitable to their needs. EAS offers four levels of language instruction, from elementary to the advanced. Two of the electives required for the major can be advanced language courses (beyond the intermediate level). The purpose of strong language preparation and achievement is to prepare students for the option of spending one or two semesters abroad, normally during their junior year. Most students take this option at our partner institutions: Peking University in China and Nanzan University or Akita International University in Japan.

Students normally begin their major with Introduction to East Asia (EASN 101) and a selection of 200-level courses during their first and sophomore years while they are taking Japanese or Chinese. EAS also offers a range of 300-level courses designed to prepare students for the research and independent study at the core of the department’s capstone Senior Research course (EASN 490), offered in the spring of a student’s senior year. Students are also required to take electives in both the humanities (including at least one literature course) and social sciences and gain a more regional understanding of East Asia by taking at least one course on an East Asia country that is not the focus of their language instruction. Here is a guide to the kinds of suggested courses a typical EAS major takes during the four years:

First and Sophomore Years
Chinese or Japanese language courses to or beyond the intermediate level
Introduction to East Asian Studies and at least two 200-level courses in the humanities and/or social sciences

Junior Year
Study abroad for one or two semesters in Japan or China
Additional 200-level electives and requirements if on campus
300-level course if on campus during the spring semester

Senior Year
300-level course during the fall semester (if not already taken)
More 200-level courses in line with plans for completing the major requirements
490 Research Seminar in the spring

For information regarding the suggested guidelines, please feel free to contact the chair of EAS or any member of the department.

Honors

Honors within the major is determined by the quality of the senior thesis, which must display outstanding writing and analytical skills, and mastery of the research subject and its context. In addition to the written thesis, honors in East Asian Studies takes into account GPA within the major, overall GPA, the oral presentation of the thesis project, and the fielding of questions, but is neither precluded nor guaranteed by them. On the basis of a composite of these factors, the East Asian Studies faculty may decide to award honors to deserving students. Students interested in honors are encouraged to talk to their advisors no later than fall pause of their senior year for guidance to help them craft a thesis project able to meet the standards. Students who receive honors will be notified via email on the Thursday before graduation.

Courses

The following course is offered in China

207 China Practicum
Offered in Beijing, China. An intensive in-country introduction to Chinese culture and society. The course is particularly suited to students who have not had a chance to take two years of Mandarin Chinese language instruction and/or are not able to take advantage of the College's semester or year-long program in China. The course will introduce students to various aspects of Chinese society and culture and will link classroom study to outside-the-classroom and on-site experiences. The latter will include academic excursions to places of historical and cultural interest as well as to institutions like factories, schools, businesses, community organizations, and recreation areas that exemplify contemporary Chinese life. Course content will vary with the particular expertise and interests of the instructor(s) and curricular needs.
This course fulfills the Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement.

 

The following course is offered in Japan

208 Japan Practicum
Offered in Japan. An intensive in-country introduction to Japanese culture and society. The course is particularly suited to students who have not had a chance to take two years of Japanese language instruction and/or are not able to take advantage of the College's semester or year-long program in Japan. The course will introduce students to various aspects of Japanese society and culture and will link classroom study to outside-the-classroom and on-site experiences. The latter will include academic excursions to places of historical and cultural interest as well as to institutions like factories, schools, businesses, community organizations, and recreation areas that exemplify contemporary Japanese life. Course content will vary with the particular expertise and interests of the instructor(s) and curricular needs.
This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences and Comparative Civilizations distribution requirements.

East Asian Studies Courses

101 Introduction to East Asia
An interdisciplinary study of East Asian civilizations. The course provides a framework for understanding by introducing students to traditional social and cultural patterns in East Asia and to the variety of transformations that have taken place there.
This course fulfills the Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement.

201 Chinese Literature
This course is a survey of Chinese literature from 3000 years ago to the present. By looking at its origin in ancient myths, folklore and Taoist philosophy; examining the impact of Confucianism, Buddhism and certain historical events; tracing the development of genres and literary traditions, and sampling masterpieces, students will get an overview of Chinese literature and become familiar with the major writers in both premodern and modern periods.
This course fulfills the DIV I.b. distribution requirement and Comparative Civilization graduation requirement.

202 Japanese Literature
This course is an introduction to Japanese literature from the earliest times to the present. While introducing great works and important genres of Japanese literature (in English translation), the course will explore various issues central to this literature, such as love, death, national identity, nature, gender and literary genre, while placing the works in their historical and cultural contexts.
This course fulfills the DIV I.b. distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement.

203 Topics in East Asian Literature
Selected topics in East Asian Literature; e.g., Chinese Women in Literature, Modern Japanese Literature, Pre-Modern Japanese Literature.
This course fulfills the DIV I.b. and Comparative Civilizations distribution requirements.

204 Topics in East Asian Cinema
This course will introduce students to the cinematic traditions of China, Japan, Korea or a combination of the above. Possible topics may include: surveys of film in these countries, adaptation, women in East Asian film, and genre films.
This course fulfills the DIV I.C. distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement. Offered every two years.

205 Topics in East Asian Humanities
Selected topics in East Asian humanities: e.g., Japanese Women, Modern China through Film, Women's Images in Chinese Film, Japanese Architecture.
This course fulfills the DIV I.a. or DIV I.c. distribution requirement, depending on topic and the Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement.

206 Topics in East Asian Society
Selected topics in East Asian society: e.g., Modern Japanese Culture, Chinese Society, Chinese Emperors, The Chinese City.
This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement.

236 Japanese Society
This course is an introduction to contemporary Japanese society. The course examines what everyday life is like in Japan from anthropological and historical perspectives. It explores such major social institutions as families, gender, communities, workplaces, and belief systems. The course focuses as well on the ways in which modernization has affected these institutions and the identities of Japanese people.
This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement.

259 Law, Politics, and Society in Asia
This course examines the interaction between law, legal institutions and citizens in China, Japan, India and Thailand. Covering history and the contemporary scene, course focuses on how law works in practice and is understood and used by ordinary people in Asia. It covers areas such as marriage and divorce, the legal profession, lost property, civil rights, the environment, sexuality, mediation, land development and property, among others. Comparisons between the United States and Asia, as well as between Asian countries, will be emphasized.
This course is cross-listed as POSC 259 and LAWP 259.

305 Colloquium in East Asian Humanities
Intensive discussion of topics in East Asian Humanities. Designed for majors and for non-majors who have taken courses in related fields. This course satisfies the Comparative Civilizations and, depending on the topic, Division I.A. or Division I.C. distribution requirement. Topics include: Chinese Culture in ¿The Dream of the Red Chamber¿, Strange Stories from a Chinese studio, Issues of Identity among Asian-Americans, the films of Akira Kurosawa, Images of Japan in the West, Issues of Love and Gender in Modern Japanese Literature, Kyoto School Philosophy, Japanese Landscape Architecture.
Prerequisite: East Asian Studies majors and non-majors who have taken courses in related fields or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement.

306 Colloquium on East Asian Society
Intensive discussion of topics on East Asian Society. Designed for majors and for non-majors who have taken courses in related fields. This course satisfies the Division II and Comparative Civilizations distribution requirements. Topics include: Beijing and Shanghai: A Tale of Two Cities, Sino-Japanese Wars, Chinese Emperors, the Chinese Diaspora, Marriage Laws in Modern China, Meiji Restoration, Aristocracy in Ancient Japan, Samurai Culture, Japanese Constitutions.
Prerequisite: East Asian Studies majors and non-majors who have taken courses in related fields or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the DIV II distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement.

310 Interpreting the Chinese Cultural Revolution
This seminar examines the varying approaches and methodologies scholars have adopted in studying the Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution in China (1966-1976), one of the most important political events in modern Chinese history. While the course does cover some history, its approach is mainly analytical to formulate effective research results. How can we know if a certain methodology is appropriate? How have primary and secondary sources been used to understand this complex event? The goal is to teach students about what happened during the Cultural Revolution and how scholars have studied it.
Prerequisite: 101. This course fulfills the DIV II social sciences distribution requirement and Comparative Civilizations graduation requirement. Offered every two years.

490 Senior Research
Leading to a senior thesis and jointly supervised by at least two faculty in the program.

Chinese

General Information

Minor

Five courses: Four Chinese language courses beyond Intermediate CHIN 212. One additional 300-level (or higher) Chinese language course or one non-language East Asian course on China.

Courses

101 Elementary Chinese
A study of the fundamentals of Mandarin Chinese, including grammar, reading, and writing using both traditional and simplified characters, pinyin romanization, pronunciation, and conversational skills.

102 Elementary Chinese
A study of the fundamentals of Mandarin Chinese, including grammar, reading, and writing using both traditional and simplified characters, pinyin romanization, pronunciation, and conversational skills.
Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent

211 Intermediate Chinese
An enhancement of the oral and written skills of elementary language study. In addition, students will learn to use dictionaries to translate original literary works. Extra conversational work will be included, geared to understanding and participating in Chinese culture.
Prerequisite: 102 or the equivalent.

212 Intermediate Chinese
An enhancement of the oral and written skills of elementary language study. In addition, students will learn to use dictionaries to translate original literary works. Extra conversational work will be included, geared to understanding and participating in Chinese culture.
Prerequisite: 211 or the equivalent.

231 Advanced Chinese
Advanced reading, writing, speaking, and understanding of the Chinese language for students who have completed Chinese 212. This course aims to enhance the students' understanding of Chinese culture and introduce them to issues in contemporary China through reading and discussion.
Prerequisite: 212 or the equivalent

232 Advanced Chinese
Advanced reading, writing, speaking, and understanding of the Chinese language for students who have completed Chinese 212. This course aims to enhance the students' understanding of Chinese culture and introduce them to issues in contemporary China through reading and discussion.
Prerequisite: 231 or the equivalent

361 Advanced Chinese II
Reading of selected literary works by modern Chinese writers and articles from Chinese newspapers and magazines. These courses involve more sophisticated conversation and composition on important social, political, and economics issues in China.
Prerequisite: 232 or permission of the instructor.

362 Advanced Chinese II
Reading of selected literary works by modern Chinese writers and articles from Chinese newspapers and magazines. These courses involve more sophisticated conversation and composition on important social, political, and economics issues in China.
Prerequisite: 361 or permission of the instructor.

380 Topics in Modern Chinese Reading
The course covers a selected topic or selected topics, such as Chinese literature, culture, politics, economy, education, ethnicity, law, and history. It analyzes the readings with focuses on both the topic(s) and the language. It advances students' speaking, reading, and writing proficiency in specific subjects while broadening their background and native knowledge in these areas too. It can be taken more than once when the topics are different.
Prerequisite: 362 or the equivalent. This course fulfills the WR graduation requirement.

Japanese

General Information

Minor

Five courses: Four Japanese language courses beyond Intermediate JPNS 212. One additional, 300-level (or higher) Japanese language course or one non-language East Asian course on Japan.

Courses

101 Elementary Japanese
These courses establish the basic language skills including listening, speaking, reading and writing. These courses also provide students with a brief overview of Japanese culture.

102 Elementary Japanese
These courses establish the basic language skills including listening, speaking, reading and writing. These courses also provide students with a brief overview of Japanese culture.
Prerequisite: 101 or permission of instructor

211 Intermediate Japanese
The aim of this course is the mastery of the basic structure of Japanese language and communicative skills. The student will have an opportunity to get to know more of Japanese culture.
Prerequisite: 102 or permission of the instructor.

212 Intermediate Japanese
The aim of this course is the mastery of the basic structure of Japanese language and communicative skills. The student will have an opportunity to get to know more of Japanese culture.
Prerequisite: 211 or permission of the instructor.

231 Advanced Japanese
The emphasis in this course is placed on enhancing the students' fluency and acquiring increasingly creative skills through composition, oral presentation and discussion.
Prerequisite: 212 or permission of the instructor.

232 Advanced Japanese
The emphasis in this course is placed on enhancing the students' fluency and acquiring increasingly creative skills through composition, oral presentation and discussion.
Prerequisite: 231 or permission of the instructor.

361 Advanced Japanese II
The emphasis in this course is placed on polishing and refining the students' language skills. Emphasis is placed on covering more sophisticated materials such as newspapers, magazine articles, film and literature.
Prerequisite: 232 or permission of the instructor.

362 Advanced Japanese II
The emphasis in this course is placed on polishing and refining the students' language skills. Emphasis is placed on covering more sophisticated materials such as newspapers, magazine articles, film and literature.
Prerequisite: 361 or permission of the instructor.