Department Chair
Andrea B. Lieber
Associate Professor of Religion, Sophia Ava Asbell Chair in Judaic Studies (1998).
East College Room 106
lieber@dickinson.edu
(717) 245-1482
Department Faculty
Andrea B. Lieber
Associate Professor of Religion, Sophia Ava Asbell Chair in Judaic Studies (1998).
East College Room 106
(717) 245-1482 | lieber@dickinson.edu
B.A., Vassar College, 1989; M.A., Columbia University, 1993; M.Phil., 1995; Ph.D., 1998.

Her courses explore the transformations of Judaism as a living religion and evolving culture from its origins in antiquity through its varied manifestations in the 20th century. Special interests include: Judaism and early Christianity, Jewish mysticism (kabbalah), women and gender in Jewish tradition.
Nitsa Kann
Associate Professor of Judaic Studies (2005).
East College Room 208
(717) 254-8977 | kannn@dickinson.edu
B.A., Hebrew University, 1982; M.A., University of California at Berkeley, 1984; Ph.D., 2005.

Her teaching interests include Hebrew language, Hebrew Literature, Kabbalah, and Middle Eastern Cinema. She is the author of two Hebrew books of poems, 'Black Soul Singer' (1989), and 'A Woman With Child' (1992), and the author of two Hebrew novels, 'Gazelle of Love' (1995), and 'Herotica' (1998).
Contributing Faculty
David D. Commins
(on sabbatical Spring 2015)
Professor of History, Benjamin Rush Chair in the Liberal Arts and Sciences (1987).
Denny Hall Room 205
commins@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of California at Berkeley, 1976; Ph.D., University of Michigan, 1985.

His teaching interests are in modern Middle Eastern history with an emphasis on Islamic thought and political movements. His most recent book is The Gulf States: A Modern History. A new publication, Islam in Saudi Arabia, will be available later in 2014. His other books are The Wahhabi Mission and Saudi Arabia, Historical Dictionary of Syria, and Islamic Reform.
Neil J. Diamant
Professor of Asian Law and Society (2002).
Stern Center for Global Educ Room 005
(717) 245-1540 | diamantn@dickinson.edu
B.A., Hebrew University of Jerusalem 1988; M.A., University of Washington, 1991; Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley, 1996.

Professor Diamant's research focuses on law and society in Asia (with particular reference to China, Japan, and India), civil-military relations in China, patriotism in comparative perspective, and the history of Chinese constitutionalism. He also teaches courses on Israeli politics and Zionism. Publications: Professor Diamant is the author of two books, Embattled Glory: Veterans, Military Families and the Politics of Patriotism in China, 1949-2007 (Rowman & Littlefield, 2009) and Revolutionizing the Family: Politics, Love, and Divorce in Urban and Rural China, 1949-1968 (University of California Press, 2000). He also co-edited Engaging the Law in China: State, Society and Possibilities for Justice (Stanford, 2005). Recent articles include "Conspicuous Silence: Veterans and the Depoliticization of War Memory in China" (Modern Asian Studies, 2011), "Veterans, Organization, and the Politics of Martial Citizenship in China" (Journal of East Asian Studies, 2007), "Veterans' Political Activism in China" (Modern China, 2014), "Contentious Veterans: China's Ex-Officers Speak Out" (Armed Forces and Society, 2014). Forthcoming articles on China's 1954 Constitution will appear in The China Journal (2015) and Cold War Studies (2015). He has contributed chapters to a number of edited volumes, including "The Limitations of Martial Citizenship in the People's Republic of China," in Peled, Lewin-Epstein, Mundlak and Cohen's Democratic Citizenship and War (2010); "Why Archives?" in Carlson, Gallagher, Lieberthal, and Manion's Chinese Politics: New Sources, Methods, and Field Strategies (2010); and "Legal Syncretism and Family Change in Urban and Rural China" in Galvan and Sil's, Reconfiguring Institutions across Time and Space: Syncretic Responses to Challenges of Political and Economic Transformation (2007).
Edward P. Merwin
Part-time Associate Professor of Religion; Director of The Milton B. Asbell Center for Jewish Life(2001).
Asbell Center
(717) 245-1636 | merwin@dickinson.edu
B.A., Amherst College, 1990; M.A., Hunter College of the City University of New York, 1998; Ph.D., 2002.

His teaching interests are in American Jewish history and popular culture, with a particular focus on the Lower East Side and Yiddish culture. His current research centers on Jewish-themed Broadway plays, and on the history of the Jewish deli in America.
Theodore Pulcini
Thomas Bowman Professor of Religion and Philosophy (1995).
East College Room 203A
(717) 245-1208 | pulcini@dickinson.edu
B.A., Harvard College, 1976; M.A., University of Notre Dame, 1979; Th.M., Harvard Divinity School, 1982; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1994.
Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, 1998-1999; Dickinson Award for Distinguished Teaching, 2002-03.

His teaching responsibilities focus on exploring the Biblical texts in their historical, social, and comparative contexts. He also specializes in Islam, early Christianity, and Eastern Orthodox Christianity. Research interests include relations between Islam and Christianity, both past and present.
Karl D. Qualls
Professor of History (2000).
Denny Hall Room 201
(717) 245-1774 | quallsk@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of Missouri at Columbia, 1993; Ph.D., Georgetown University, 1998.
Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, 2003-04.

His teaching interests include Russian and German history, comparative revolutions (political, social, and cultural), dictators, urban history, and more. His book "From Ruins to Reconstruction: Urban Identity in Soviet Sevastopol after World War II" (Cornell, 2009) challenges notions of totalitarianism, investigates the creation of historical myths, and outlines the role of monuments and urban space in identity formation in a city torn between Ukraine and Russia. He is currently working on a new book about children who fled the Spanish Civil War and were raised in the Soviet Union.
Shalom D. Staub
Associate Provost for Academic Affairs (2004).
West College (Old West) 2nd Floor
(717) 254-8917 | staubs@dickinson.edu
B.A., Wesleyan University, 1977; M.A., 1978; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1985.

His research and teaching interests focus on 1) various dimensions of conflict analysis, conflict resolution and peacemaking, and 2) the ethnography of religious experience, including “folk” religion, religion and conflict, and the intersection of religion with race, ethnicity, and gender. These interests play out in his courses on conflict and conflict resolution studies, religion and conflict, ethnography of Jewish experience, folk religious practices in the Middle East and North Africa, and immigration and religious diversity in the US.