Department Chair
Christopher A. Francese
The Asbury J. Clarke Professor of Classical Studies (1996).
East College Room 110
francese@dickinson.edu
(717) 245-1202
Department Faculty
Christopher A. Francese
The Asbury J. Clarke Professor of Classical Studies (1996).
East College Room 110
(717) 245-1202 | francese@dickinson.edu
B.A., Oberlin College, 1987; M.A., University of Texas at Austin, 1989; Ph.D., 1993.

He specializes in Roman literature and culture, and Greek mythography. He is the project director of Dickinson College Commentaries, a series of online multimedia editions of classical texts, and is the author of three books: Ancient Rome: An Anthology of Sources (Hackett, 2014), Ancient Rome in So Many Words (Hippocrene, 2007), and Parthenius of Nicaea and Roman Poetry (Peter Lang, 2001). He also produces the Latin Poetry Podcast, and directs a series of professional development workshops for Latin teachers, the Dickinson Latin Workshops. With student and faculty collaborators he created the Latin and Greek Core Vocabularies, the thousand most common words in Latin and the 500 most common words in ancient Greek, collated and edited on the basis of large samples.
Marc Mastrangelo
(on leave of absence 2014-15)
Professor of Classical Studies (1997).

mastrang@dickinson.edu
B.A., Amherst College, 1985; M.A., Wadham College, Oxford University, 1988; M.A., Brown University, 1995; Ph.D., 1996.

His special interests include fourth century Christian Latin poetry, Latin philosophical prose, Greek tragedy and ancient philosophy. His specialty is the poet Prudentius.
Meghan Newell Reedy
Assistant Professor of Classical Studies (2007).
East College Room 109
(717) 245-1380 | reedym@dickinson.edu
B.A., Whitman College, 1996; M.A., University of Durham, England, 2000; D.Phil., University of Oxford, England, 2007.

Since arriving at Dickinson, she has expanded her teaching interests to include Roman history alongside Greek and Latin language. Her current research is on emotional display in Roman poetry, particularly in the moody love poems of Propertius.
Scott Farrington
Visiting Assistant Professor of Classical Studies (2014).
East College Room 101
farrings@dickinson.edu
B.A., Loyola University, 1993; M.F.A., University of Alaska, 1999; Ph.D., University of Colorado-Boulder, 2008.

Contributing Faculty
Christofilis Maggidis
Associate Professor of Archaeology; Christopher Roberts Chair in Archaeology (2001).
Archaeology
(717) 245-1014 | maggidic@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of Athens, 1988; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1994.

Maggidis is currently Director of Glas, Assistant to the Director of Mycenae, and President of the Mycenaean Foundation with nearly three decades of field experience at major archaeological sites, including Mycenae, Glas, Crete (Archanes, Idaion Cave), and Akrotiri (Thera). Since receiving his post-doctorate from Brown University and a research fellowship from Harvard, his research and teaching interests focus primarily on Minoan and Mycenaean art and archaeology, but they also include topics in Greek sculpture and architecture. Maggidis is the author of many articles, international conference papers, and three forthcoming books.
Theodore Pulcini
Thomas Bowman Professor of Religion and Philosophy (1995).
East College Room 203A
(717) 245-1208 | pulcini@dickinson.edu
B.A., Harvard College, 1976; M.A., University of Notre Dame, 1979; Th.M., Harvard Divinity School, 1982; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh, 1994.
Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, 1998-1999; Dickinson Award for Distinguished Teaching, 2002-03.

His teaching responsibilities focus on exploring the Biblical texts in their historical, social, and comparative contexts. He also specializes in Islam, early Christianity, and Eastern Orthodox Christianity. Research interests include relations between Islam and Christianity, both past and present.
Melinda W. Schlitt
Professor of Art History, William W. Edel Professor of Humanities (1990).
Weiss Center for the Arts Room 227
(717) 245-1245 | schlitt@dickinson.edu
B.A., State University of New York at Purchase, 1981; M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1983; Ph.D., 1991.

Professor Schlitt teaches courses in art and architecture of the Italian Renaissance, Mannerism, and ancient Greek and Roman art and architecture. Her current research focuses on 15th and 16th-century Italian art and criticism. She has published several articles on Francesco Salviati, Giorgio Vasari, and Michelangelo, and edited (and contributed to) two important books of new essays, "Perspectives on Early Modern and Modern Intellectual History," (Univ. of Rochester Press, 2001) and "Gifts in Return: Essays in Honour of Charles Dempsey," (Univ of Toronto Press, 2012). Prof. Schlitt is currently completing a monograph on Francesco Salviati and a study on the Arch of Constantine.