Department Chair
James G. Ellison
Associate Professor of Anthropology (2005).
Denny Hall Room 307
ellisonj@dickinson.edu
(717) 245-1902
Department Faculty
Christofilis Maggidis
Associate Professor of Archaeology; Christopher Roberts Chair in Archaeology (2001).
Archaeology
(717) 245-1014 | maggidic@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of Athens, 1988; Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1994.

Maggidis is currently Director of Glas, Assistant to the Director of Mycenae, and President of the Mycenaean Foundation with nearly three decades of field experience at major archaeological sites, including Mycenae, Glas, Crete (Archanes, Idaion Cave), and Akrotiri (Thera). Since receiving his post-doctorate from Brown University and a research fellowship from Harvard, his research and teaching interests focus primarily on Minoan and Mycenaean art and archaeology, but they also include topics in Greek sculpture and architecture. Maggidis is the author of many articles, international conference papers, and three forthcoming books.
Maria C. Bruno
Assistant Professor of Archaeology (2011).
Environmental Archaeology Lab
(717) 245-1923 | brunom@dickinson.edu
B.A., University of Nevada, 1998; M.A., Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, 2001; Ph.D., 2008.

Contributing Faculty
James G. Ellison
Associate Professor of Anthropology (2005).
Denny Hall Room 307
(717) 245-1902 | ellisonj@dickinson.edu
B.A., Michigan State University, 1987; M.A., University of Florida, 1990; Ph.D., 1999.

A broadly trained cultural anthropologist, Ellison researches political and economic transformations and culture in eastern Africa, focusing on colonialism, socialism, and "neoliberalism." His main fieldwork sites are in Tanzania and Ethiopia. He also co-directs a summer field school in Tanzania to teach anthropological research methods.
Kjell I. Enge
Associate Professor of Anthropology (1984).
Denny Hall Room 20
(717) 245-1207 | enge@dickinson.edu
B.A., Northeastern University, 1964; Ph.D., Boston University, 1981.

Prof. Enge's specialties include the design and use of monitoring systems to track the progress of education and health projects and the evaluation of projects, including formative, summative and the determination of sustainability into the future. His current work in education includes directing a three-year cross-national evaluation of the libraries donated to primary/secondary schools in Asia and Africa by Room to Read to determine the effects and attitudes toward reading and literacy involving both schools, parents and community leaders. The evaluation uses a multi-method combination of quantitative-qualitative methods and is being carried out in Laos, Nepal and Zambia. He is also in the process of completing a series of case studies in Rajasthan, India on private public partnerships (PPP) in education. These case studies involve CISCO, Educate Girls Globally, the Rajasthan ministry of Education, financed by USAID (under EQUIP1) and done in conjunction with the World Economic Forum. The objective is to determine what makes these partnerships successful and how access to and the quality of education can be improved. He uses examples from work in both education and health to show students the practical uses of the social sciences to address world problems.
Christopher A. Francese
The Asbury J. Clarke Professor of Classical Studies (1996).
East College Room 110
(717) 245-1202 | francese@dickinson.edu
B.A., Oberlin College, 1987; M.A., University of Texas at Austin, 1989; Ph.D., 1993.

He specializes in Roman literature and culture, and Greek mythography. He is the project director of Dickinson College Commentaries, a series of online multimedia editions of classical texts, and is the author of three books: Ancient Rome: An Anthology of Sources (Hackett, 2014), Ancient Rome in So Many Words (Hippocrene, 2007), and Parthenius of Nicaea and Roman Poetry (Peter Lang, 2001). He also produces the Latin Poetry Podcast, and directs a series of professional development workshops for Latin teachers, the Dickinson Latin Workshops. With student and faculty collaborators he created the Latin and Greek Core Vocabularies, the thousand most common words in Latin and the 500 most common words in ancient Greek, collated and edited on the basis of large samples.
Ann M. Hill
Professor of Anthropology (1986).
Denny Hall Room 210
(717) 245-1659 | hillan@dickinson.edu
B.A., Columbia University, 1971; M.A., University of Iowa, 1974; Ph.D., University of Illinois, 1982.

Prof. Hill has conducted fieldwork in both Thailand and SW China. As a cultural anthropologist, Prof.Hill has published on a range of topics relevant to understanding ethnicity and inter-ethnic relations in the Sino-SE Asian uplands (e.g. Women Without Talents Are Virtuous, 1988 in Gender, Power and Construction of the Moral Order on the Thai Periphery; Chinese Dominance of the Xishuangbanna Tea Trade: An Inter-Regional Perspective, 1989 Modern China; Captives, Kin and Slaves in Xiao Liangshan, 2001 J. of Asian Studies; Provocative Behavior: Agency and Feuds in SW China, 2004 Am Anthropologist; Fried's Evolutionary Model, Social Stratification, and the Nuosu in SW China, 2012 in the Anthropological Study of Class and Class Consciousness, and other articles). She is the author of Merchants and Migrants: Ethnicity and Trade Among Yunnanese Chinese in SE Asia (1998) and co-editor with Zhou Minglang of Affirmative Action in China and the U.S. Currently she is project director for the Luce Initiative on Asian Studies and the Environment, a 4-year grant to Dickinson College from the Henry Luce Foundation.
Marcus M. Key, Jr.
Joseph Priestley Professor of Natural Philosophy (1989).
Kaufman Building Room 143
(717) 245-1448 | key@dickinson.edu
B.S., University of Texas at Austin, 1983; M.Phil., Yale University, 1986; Ph.D., 1988.
Ganoe Award for Inspirational Teaching, 2004-2005.

His teaching interests are sedimentology, stratigraphy, paleontology, evolution, extinction, energy resources, and sustainability. His research interests involve inferring evolutionary and sedimentary patterns and processes using fossil and living bryozoans. His current research involves evolution of biomineralization, marine biofouling, functional morphology of bryozoans, and geoarcheology.
Marc Mastrangelo
(on leave of absence 2014-15)
Professor of Classical Studies (1997).

mastrang@dickinson.edu
B.A., Amherst College, 1985; M.A., Wadham College, Oxford University, 1988; M.A., Brown University, 1995; Ph.D., 1996.

Prof. Mastrangelo's publications have focused on Early Christian Latin poetry, Greek tragedy, and Greco-Roman intellectual history. He is a co-editor of The Unknown Socrates (Bolchazy-Carducci, 2002) and the author of The Roman Self in Late Antiquity (Johns Hopkins, 2008). His most recent publications include two forthcoming articles: "Towards a Poetics of Late Latin Reuse," in Tradition and Innovation in the Latin Poetry of Late Antiquity (WinterVerlag); and "The Early Christian Response to Platonist Poetics: Boethius, Prudentius, and the Poeta Theologus," in The Poetics of Late Latin Literature (Oxford). Prof. Mastrangelo teaches courses at all levels of Classical language and civilization. He is co-founder of The Humanities Collective at Dickinson and is currently Visiting Professor in Anglophone Studies at the Université Jean Jaurès, Toulouse.
Melinda W. Schlitt
Professor of Art History, William W. Edel Professor of Humanities (1990).
Weiss Center for the Arts Room 227
(717) 245-1245 | schlitt@dickinson.edu
B.A., State University of New York at Purchase, 1981; M.A., Johns Hopkins University, 1983; Ph.D., 1991.

Professor Schlitt teaches courses in art and architecture of the Italian Renaissance and ancient Greek and Roman art and architecture. Her current research focuses on 15th and 16th-century Italian art and criticism. She has published several articles on Francesco Salviati, Giorgio Vasari, Michelangelo, and the relationship between language and imagery in the Renaissance, and has edited (and contributed to) two books of new essays: "Perspectives on Early Modern and Modern Intellectual History," (Univ. of Rochester Press, 2001) and "Gifts in Return: Essays in Honour of Charles Dempsey," (Univ of Toronto Press, 2012). Prof. Schlitt is currently completing a monograph on Francesco Salviati and a study on the Arch of Constantine. Awards include the Rome Prize, American Academy in Rome; Resident Fellowship, Getty Center for the History of Art and the Humanities; Research Fellowship, American Philosophical Society; Fulbright Foundation Research Fellowship; Lila Acheson Wallace-Reader's Digest Publications Grant, Villa I Tatti, Florence.
Karen J. Weinstein
Associate Professor of Anthropology (2001).
Denny Hall Room 215
(717) 245-1281 | weinstek@dickinson.edu
B.A., Washington University, 1991; M.A., University of Illinois at Chicago, 1994; Ph.D., University of Florida, 2001.

Human variation and adaptation, human osteology, human evolution with an emphasis on the evolution of body size and shape and postcranial anatomy in genus Homo, comparative primate skeletal biology, nutritional anthropology