Spring 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
BIOL 131-01 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Ocean Ecology
Instructor: Michael Potthoff
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.
0900:TR   DANA 110
1330:W   JAMESR 2218
BIOL 131-02 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Plant Ecology
Instructor: Jason Smith
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1330:W   JAMESR 2228
0930:MWF   TOME 115
BIOL 131-03 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems: Topics in Plant Ecology
Instructor: Jason Smith
Course Description:
This introductory course spans levels of biological organization from basic multicellular microanatomy to organismal physiology and ecology, as understood through the lens of evolution. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include evolutionary principles of variation, selection, competition and cooperation, and how their operation at different levels of organization accounts for form and function of organisms, communities, and ecosystems. We will investigate homeostasis, reproduction and development as physiological processes that take place within organisms, and as ecological processes that interact with the environment and generate diversity of form over evolutionary time. Finally we will take stock of the existing forms and levels of biological organization and ask how their relationships establish the biosphere in which we live. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before entering the upper level. It is complementary to BIOL 132 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1330:R   JAMESR 2228
0930:MWF   TOME 115
BIOL 132-01 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Topics in the Molecular Basis of Disease
Instructor: Nikolaos Tsotakos
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1030:MWF   DANA 110
1330:M   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 132-02 Introduction to Molecules, Genes, and Cells: Topics in the Molecular Basis of Disease
Instructor: Nikolaos Tsotakos
Course Description:
This introductory course approaches core biological themes from the molecular and cellular level, and is complementary to BIOL 131, Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems. Course content will be focused around a specific theme determined by the instructor, and will include biomolecule and cell structure and function; cell signaling and communication; chromosome and gene structure; DNA replication; transcription; and translation. The course will involve lecture, discussion, and readings from scientific literature. Laboratory exercises include both classic and modern approaches to cellular and molecular biology utilizing prokaryotic and/or eukaryotic organisms. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying current techniques to biological experiments. Three hours classroom and three hours laboratory a week. This is one of two courses required of all Biology majors before completing upper level coursework. It is complementary to BIOL 131 Introduction to Organisms, Populations, and Ecosystems, and the courses may be taken in either order.
1030:MWF   DANA 110
1330:T   JAMESR 2228
BIOL 216-01 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Kirsten Guss
Course Description:
A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
0930:MWF   DANA 202
1330:F   JAMESR 2206
BIOL 216-02 Genetics w/Lab
Instructor: Heather Lehman
Course Description:
A study of Mendelian genetics, linkage, and mutation. An introduction to basic DNA structure and function including replication, transcription, and translation. Laboratory exercises involve both classic and molecular approaches to genetic analysis utilizing prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: 131 & 132. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125.
1330:R   JAMESR 2206
1030:TR   TOME 115
BIOL 301-01 Wildlife Ecology
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
Wildlife Ecology is designed for majors in both Environmental Science and Biology. This course approaches ecology from the aspect of focusing on individual organisms and the role they play in their environment. Students will visit various habitats in Pennsylvania and view wildlife first hand. The texts are both place based focusing on Northeastern forests and Northeastern vernal ponds. These two ecosystems are intimately linked and the health of one influences the other. Students will have hands on labs with living organisms and investigate the roles each of these organisms play in the forest and vernal pool environment. A focus of the course will be how we must manage these ecosystems if they are to be enjoyed by our grandchildren. Both of these ecosystems are being changed by human ignorance and global climate change. We are at a squeak point in our ability to sustain these ecosystems. Only a complete understanding of their ecology and rapid action will sustain them for future generations.
1030:TR   KAUF 109
1330:T   KAUF 109
BIOL 301-02 Neuroethology
Instructor: Anthony Pires
Course Description:
This course is an exploration of animal behavior from a mechanistic and evolutionary perspective. Mechanistic means that we will study the physiological mechanisms in nervous systems that are the immediate causes of behavior. Evolutionary means that we will study the diversity of evolved behaviors in a variety of animals, in a broad phylogenetic and ecological context that is explicitly not human-centered. Neuroethology is about evolved behaviors of wild animals in nature. Laboratory work will involve neurophysiological and behavioral study of a variety of animals at the bench and outdoors.
1030:TR   DANA 101
1330:T   JAMESR 1228
BIOL 301-03 Scientific Grant Writing
Instructor: Heather Lehman
Course Description:
Effective grant writing skills are essential to acquire competitive funding from institutions, government agencies and private foundations to perform critical research. This course will teach students the basic skills, principles, and techniques of grant writing needed to develop competitive grant proposals. We will explore a breakdown of the fundamental components of a grant proposal, the process of grant submission, and the grant review process. Students will ultimately write a full grant proposal, while learning the mechanics of proposal writing and the aspects of grantsmanship. We will emulate the proposal review process through peer evaluations, and will examine funded and unfunded grant submissions from government agencies such as the NIH. Students will also learn how to locate available grant funding sources and tailor their proposals to specific audience interests.
1330:T   DANA 201
BIOL 301-04 Ornithology
Instructor: Pamela Van Fleet
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 310-01. The classroom component of this course emphasizes the evolution, morphology, physiology, ecology and conservation biology of birds. Students will have numerous opportunities both in and outside of the classroom to examine conservation issues and actions as they relate to the functioning of natural ecosystems, the consequences of anthropogenic impacts to those environments and learn how sustainability practices influence many bird species, populations and communities. The lab portion of this course will focus on hands-on learning through a variety of tools, mechanisms and field experiences including but not limited to use of study skins and skeletons, field guides, optics and field-monitoring techniques. Students will be regularly immersed in living labs during field trips both local and regional including visits to a bird banding station, state wildlife management areas and research study sites. In addition students will learn how to identify birds through specific behaviors, visual field marks, songs and calls. There will be at least one day-long field trip during a weekend, one extended lab field trip to a waterfowl stopover habitat during spring migration and an optional 4-5 day field trip over spring break to visit other sites utilized by birds in and outside of Pennsylvania. Each student will also complete a research paper on selected ornithological topics.
0830:MWF   KAUF 109
0930:M   KAUF 109
BIOL 301-05 Field Biology, Tools, Techniques and Protocols
Instructor: Pamela Van Fleet
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 311-03. Permission of Instructor Required. This course will provide students with a solid foundation and hands on experiences regarding the practical use of specific tools and the application of field methods and techniques used in both environmental consulting and wildlife sciences today. Course work will focus on numerous topics including research and experimental design; collection, management and analysis of data; identification of animals and marking techniques; measuring animal abundance; assessment of wildlife habitat, the role of radio and satellite telemetry; and the practical application of spatial technology (GIS). Student will gain hands on experience in reading and using topographic maps, interpreting aerial photos,using a compass and hand held GPS, orienteering, and creating maps in GIS. Students will also learn about employing and in many cases conducting point counts, nest searches, transect surveys, live trapping and marking, use of remote cameras; telemetry; and the use of mist nets for capturing birds and mammals. At least one field trip will include a day long (weekend) visit to an active research site.
1330:F   KAUF 113
BIOL 313-01 Cell Biology w/Lab
Instructor: Mary Niblock
Course Description:
An introduction to the structure and function of cells, with emphasis on the molecular mechanisms of cellular processes. The course will involve discussion-oriented lectures and readings from the current literature. The laboratory will stress the discovery approach in applying state of the art techniques to cell biological experiments. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors only, prerequisite is 132 and PSYC 125 and NRSC 200.
1030:MWF   DANA 202
1330:W   JAMESR 1218
BIOL 322-01 Plant Systematics w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
A systematic survey of the plant kingdom through the collection and study of living plants. Frequent field trips are conducted as weather permits. An herbarium of named plants is prepared. Emphasis will be placed on the diverse features of plants which permit effective study of fundamental biological problems. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course.
0830:MW   DANA 101
1230:M   RNORTH 2319
BIOL 322-02 Plant Systematics w/Lab
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
A systematic survey of the plant kingdom through the collection and study of living plants. Frequent field trips are conducted as weather permits. An herbarium of named plants is prepared. Emphasis will be placed on the diverse features of plants which permit effective study of fundamental biological problems. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course.
0830:MW   DANA 101
1230:W   RNORTH 2319
BIOL 325-01 Plant Physiology w/Lab
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
A study of plant structure and function, with emphasis on the flowering plants. Includes plant cells and organelles, mineral nutrition, translocation processes, and hormonal regulation of growth, development, and reproduction. Biochemical and environmental aspects of photosynthesis are emphasized. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level Biology course. For ENST/ENSC majors only, prerequisite is ENST 162.
0900:TR   KAUF 178
1330:W   KAUF 178
BIOL 334-01 Vertebrate Biology w/Lab
Instructor: Charles Zwemer
Course Description:
An integrated lecture and laboratory study of the anatomy, embryology, physiology, and evolution of vertebrates. Representative live and dissection specimens are studied from the perspective of structure and function. Six hours classroom a week. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
0900:TR   RNORTH 1317
1030:TR   RNORTH 1317
BIOL 335-01 Microanatomy
Instructor: Charles Zwemer
Course Description:
An integrated lecture and laboratory course focused on the functional microanatomy/histology of mammals. This course will examine the microscopic anatomy of cells, tissues, organ, and organ systems and the crucial relationship between form and function. The laboratory portion of the course will emphasize the process of microscopic examination and cover methods of contemporary histologic technique. Prerequisites: One 200-level BIOL course. For Neuroscience majors, prerequisite is NRSC 200.
0830:MWF   RNORTH 1317
BIOL 342-01 Structure and Function of Biomolecules w/Lab
Instructor: Rebecca Connor
Course Description:
Cross-listed with CHEM 342-01. This course is an introductory biochemistry course focused on the chemistry of the major molecules that compose living matter. The structure and function of the major classes of biomolecules (nucleic acids, proteins, lipids, and carbohydrates) are addressed along with other topics including bioenergetics, enzyme catalysis, and information transfer at the molecular level. The laboratory portion of the course focuses on methods used to study the properties and behavior of biological molecules and their functions in the cell. Three hours lecture and four hours of laboratory per week. Prerequisite: CHEM 242; an introductory biology course is highly recommended. This course is cross-listed as CHEM 342.
1030:TR   STUART 1113
1230:F   STUART 2112
BIOL 401-01 Precision Medicine
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), precision medicine is "an emerging approach for disease treatment and prevention that takes into account individual variability in genes, environment, and lifestyle for each person." This departure from the one-size-fits-all approach to patient care has been made possible by advances in molecular medicine that have created an -omics era of large-scale data-rich biology. We will explore these new omics methods and their applications in preventing, diagnosing, and treating human disease. Living in the age of accelerations, we will also consider how accelerating technologies in healthcare may provide personalized cures for some while creating health disparities for others. Students will investigate primary literature, produce a research grant proposal, and conduct a research project exploring their own genome. This course will fulfill the Biology major research requirement.
0830:MWF   RNORTH 1316
BIOL 412-01 Bio-Imaging
Instructor: John Henson
Course Description:
Through detailed study of the primary biological literature, students acquire an understanding of the methodology and philosophy of scientific research. Includes study of the formulation of hypotheses, the design of experiments or observations to test these hypotheses, and the interpretation of results. This course will normally require a major research-based presentation and/or paper and may also involve the conduct of research by students. This course satisfies the requirement for a research experience for the biology major. Prerequisites: two Biology courses numbered between 120 and 129, and one upper-level biology course.
1330:F   JAMESR 1218
BIOL 425-01 The Biology of Cancer w/lab
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
Cancer is a genetic disorder that affects some 10 million people worldwide. In the United States, cancer is a close second to heart disease as the leading cause of death. This course will examine the molecular basis of cancer including the genes and signaling pathways involved in malignant transformation and the physiological consequences of uncontrolled cell growth. Current methods in cancer research and recent advances in cancer treatment will also be discussed. Specific topics covered will include: oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes, oncogenic mutation, tumor viruses, apoptosis, angiogenesis, metastasis, tumor immunology, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and biological therapy. Six hours classroom/laboratory a week. Prerequisite: One of the following: 216, 313, 316, 318, 326, 327, 380, or permission of the instructor.
0900:TR   DANA 202
1330:M   RNORTH 1316
BIOL 550-01 Ecology of Dung Beetle Fauna in an Agroecosystem
Instructor: Jason Smith
Course Description:
 
BIOL 550-02 Diptera Taxonomy and Horn Fly IPM Research
Instructor: Jason Smith
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-01 Investigating 5'-AMP-induced Hypometabolism
Instructor: Charles Zwemer
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-02 Development of Respiratory Control in the Mouse
Instructor: Mary Niblock
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-03 Identifying Multiuse Amlyoid Beta Inhibitors for Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-04 Molecular Mechanism of lncRNA Dysregulation in Diabetic Complications
Instructor: Nikolaos Tsotakos
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-05 Effects of IGR Pesticides on a Dung Insect Community in an Agroecosystem
Instructor: Jason Smith
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-06 The use of Polyphenolics to Treat Dementia in a Mouse Model
Instructor: Thomas Arnold
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-07 Effects of Ocean Acidification on Swimming in a Mollusc Larva
Instructor: Anthony Pires
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-08 Hemlock Woolly Adelgid Research
Instructor: Carol Loeffler
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-09 Effects of Ocean Acidification and Salinity on the Development and Behavior of a Marine Gastropod
Instructor: Anthony Pires
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-10 A Comparison of Two Recovery Positions Following Strenous Exercise
Instructor: Charles Zwemer
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-11 Reprogramming Human Leukemia Cells
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-12 Computational Analysis of Acute Mylord
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-13 Nuclear Localization in Drosophila Embryo Muscles
Instructor: Kirsten Guss
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-14 Comparing Bloomtimes of the Same Spring Wild Flowers Between 1940 and 2018
Instructor: Harold Wingert
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-15 Reprogramming Human Leukemia Cells
Instructor: Michael Roberts
Course Description:
 
BIOL 560-16 Investigating the Role of Twist2 in NFKB - Mediated Esophageal Squamons Cell Carcinoma Invasion
Instructor: Heather Lehman
Course Description: