Spring 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
LAWP 200-01 Foundations in Policy Studies
Instructor: James Hoefler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PMGT 200-01.
1330:MR   DENNY 212
LAWP 230-01 Negotiation and Advocacy
Instructor: Edward Guido
Course Description:
This course will focus on the role of the advocate in the law and policy-making process. It will consider various types of advocacy (public debate, litigation, public relations, etc.) and various methods of negotiation as well as compare and contrast the advocate's role in different forums (legislatures, courts, administrative agencies, the press, etc.). Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor.
1500:MR   DENNY 212
LAWP 248-01 The Judiciary
Instructor: Douglas Edlin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 248-01.
1030:TR   DENNY 103
LAWP 250-01 Juvenile Justice
Instructor: John Cherry
Course Description:
This course will examine the nature and character of the American juvenile justice system, including its history, changing emphasis, and current trends. The system will be viewed from the point of entry into the system until final disposition. Various treatment alternatives, including rehabilitation, will also be examined. Prerequisites: POSC 120 or permission of the instructor.
1630:W   DENNY 311
LAWP 255-01 Philosophy of Law
Instructor: Douglas Edlin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PHIL 255-01.
0930:MWF   DENNY 311
LAWP 259-01 Law, Politics, and Society in Asia
Instructor: Neil Diamant
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 259-01 and POSC 259-01.
1330:TR   STERN 103
LAWP 290-01 Spatial Literacy Across the Curriculum
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 311-05 and PMGT 290-01. Understanding how to think about problems and concepts in a spatial context is a fundamental skill that is not well taught in the current Dickinson College curriculum. Alternatively referred to as Spatial Literacy or Spatial Reasoning, this type of thinking generally focuses on understanding the importance of geographic space and the relationships formed by this space. Spatial literacy, like writing and quantitative analysis, is not a stand-alone subject, but rather it is a way of thinking that is applicable to many fields of studies, and is becoming increasingly important as a valuable competency for liberal arts students throughout all divisions. This course will examine the importance of geographic space as a learning construct and explore the value of spatial literacy for problem solving, creative expression, and communication across the humanities, social science and scientific disciplines. In doing so, students will have the opportunity to consider topics within their specific areas of study, and to discover how the application of spatial thinking can enable and facilitate the problem solving process across the curriculum. Students will be introduced to an assortment of easy-to-use mapping tools that include both quantitative and qualitative techniques, and will learn how to use these tools to investigate issues and questions from a spatial perspective, incorporate spatial analysis techniques into their problem solving methodologies, and to effectively visualize their data in ways that promote a more comprehensive understanding of the problem statement.
1500:MR   STERN 11
LAWP 300-01 Gateway Course
Instructor: Christopher Gulotta
Course Description:
This course explores the diverse public-service roles that lawyers and administrators play at the local, state, national, and international levels. Emphasis will be given to the professional rights and duties attached to public-service positions and the ethical dilemmas that arise in fulfilling these responsibilities. Public-service professionals will play an integral role in the course as visiting speakers. Prerequisite: LPPM 200.
1330:W   DENNY 112
LAWP 400-01 Race and the Judicial Process
Instructor: Douglas Edlin
Course Description:
This course will serve as a capstone experience for Law and Policy majors. It will echo the key principles covered in the Foundations class, including an appreciation for (1) fluid interdisciplinarity, (2) the contingent nature of knowledge, (3) connections to the wider world beyond the college, (4) principle-based models of leadership, (5) the meaningful application of ethics, and (6) the role of stakeholder values in problem analysis and decision making processes. Emphasis will be placed on helping students refine their interdisciplinary approach to the topics of law and policy in a liberal arts framework. The seminar will give students one last comprehensive look at a series of policies to see how a legal regime limits policy choices and how the policy process informs and limits laws. Prerequisites: LPPM 200.
1330:TR   DENNY 204
LAWP 500-01 Policy Analysis
Instructor: James Hoefler
Course Description:
 
LAWP 550-01 US Capital Punishment
Instructor: James Hoefler
Course Description:
 
Courses Offered in PMGT
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PMGT 200-01 Foundations in Policy Studies
Instructor: James Hoefler
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 200-01.
1330:MR   DENNY 212
PMGT 290-01 Spatial Literacy Across the Curriculum
Instructor: James Ciarrocca
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 311-05 and LAWP 290-01. Understanding how to think about problems and concepts in a spatial context is a fundamental skill that is not well taught in the current Dickinson College curriculum. Alternatively referred to as Spatial Literacy or Spatial Reasoning, this type of thinking generally focuses on understanding the importance of geographic space and the relationships formed by this space. Spatial literacy, like writing and quantitative analysis, is not a stand-alone subject, but rather it is a way of thinking that is applicable to many fields of studies, and is becoming increasingly important as a valuable competency for liberal arts students throughout all divisions. This course will examine the importance of geographic space as a learning construct and explore the value of spatial literacy for problem solving, creative expression, and communication across the humanities, social science and scientific disciplines. In doing so, students will have the opportunity to consider topics within their specific areas of study, and to discover how the application of spatial thinking can enable and facilitate the problem solving process across the curriculum. Students will be introduced to an assortment of easy-to-use mapping tools that include both quantitative and qualitative techniques, and will learn how to use these tools to investigate issues and questions from a spatial perspective, incorporate spatial analysis techniques into their problem solving methodologies, and to effectively visualize their data in ways that promote a more comprehensive understanding of the problem statement.
1500:MR   STERN 11