Fall 2014

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHYS 102-01 Meteorology
Instructor: David Reed, Lars English
Course Description:
The physical basis of modern meteorology: characteristics of atmospheric motions, clouds, and weather systems; methods of weather observation and forecasting; meteorological aspects of air pollution. Does not count toward a physics major. This course fulfills the QR graduation requirement. (See also PHYS 202.) Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 102 and 202.
0830:MWF   TOME 115
PHYS 109-01 Astronomy w/Lab
Instructor: Robert Boyle
Course Description:
Introduction to the modern concepts of the physical nature of the astronomical universe. Historical development of astronomical ideas and origin and evolution of the solar system. A terminal laboratory course for non-science students. Three hours classroom, one two-hour laboratory a week. This course will not count toward major requirements in physics.
1900:T   TOME 105
1030:MWF   TOME 124
PHYS 109-02 Astronomy w/Lab
Instructor: Robert Boyle
Course Description:
Introduction to the modern concepts of the physical nature of the astronomical universe. Historical development of astronomical ideas and origin and evolution of the solar system. A terminal laboratory course for non-science students. Three hours classroom, one two-hour laboratory a week. This course will not count toward major requirements in physics.
1900:W   TOME 105
1030:MWF   TOME 124
PHYS 110-01 Astronomy w/Lab
Instructor: Windsor Morgan
Course Description:
Introduction to the modern concepts of the physical nature of the astronomical universe. Cosmology and the structure and evolution of the stars and galaxies. A terminal laboratory course for non-science students. Three hours classroom, one two-hour laboratory a week. This course will not count toward major requirements in physics.
1330:T   TOME 105
0900:TR   TOME 124
PHYS 110-02 Astronomy w/Lab
Instructor: Windsor Morgan
Course Description:
Introduction to the modern concepts of the physical nature of the astronomical universe. Cosmology and the structure and evolution of the stars and galaxies. A terminal laboratory course for non-science students. Three hours classroom, one two-hour laboratory a week. This course will not count toward major requirements in physics.
1330:R   TOME 105
0900:TR   TOME 124
PHYS 131-01 Introductory Physics
Instructor: David Mertens
Course Description:
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Kinematics, Newton's Laws of motion, conservation laws, rotational motion, and oscillations are studied during the first semester. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, MATH 151 or 170. This course fulfills either the DIV III lab science distribution requirement or QR graduation requirement.
0930:MWF   TOME 101
PHYS 131-02 Introductory Physics
Instructor: Lars English
Course Description:
An introduction to basic physics topics using the workshop method. This method combines inquiry-based cooperative learning with the comprehensive use of computer tools for data acquisition, data analysis and mathematical modeling. Kinematics, Newton's Laws of motion, conservation laws, rotational motion, and oscillations are studied during the first semester. Additional topics in chaos or nuclear radiation are introduced. Basic calculus concepts are used throughout the course. Recommended for physical science, mathematics, and pre-engineering students and for biology majors preparing for graduate study. Three two-hour sessions per week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141. Prerequisite: Completion of, or concurrent enrollment in, MATH 151 or 170. This course fulfills either the DIV III lab science distribution requirement or QR graduation requirement.
1330:MWF   TOME 101
PHYS 141-01 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Catrina Hamilton-Drager
Course Description:
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include mechanics, thermodynamics, acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. Three two-hour workshop sessions a week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141. This course fulfills either the DIV III lab science distribution requirement or QR graduation requirement.
1030:F   TOME 103
1030:MW   TOME 115
PHYS 141-02 Physics for the Life Sciences
Instructor: Catrina Hamilton-Drager
Course Description:
Introductory, non-calculus physics, principally for life science and pre-med students. Topics include mechanics, thermodynamics, acoustics, optics, electricity, magnetism, and modern physics. Three two-hour workshop sessions a week. Because of the similarity in course content, students will not receive graduation credit for both 131 and 141. This course fulfills either the DIV III lab science distribution requirement or QR graduation requirement.
1330:W   TOME 103
1030:MW   TOME 115
PHYS 211-01 Vibrations, Waves & Optics
Instructor: Hans Pfister
Course Description:
Completion of both PHYS 211 and PHYS 212 fulfills the WR Requirement.
1330:MR   TOME 103
PHYS 311-01 Dynamics & Chaos
Instructor: Brett Pearson
Course Description:
A project-oriented study of advanced classical mechanics using vector calculus and including an introduction to the analysis of chaotic systems. Topics might include particle dynamics in one, two and three dimensions; harmonic oscillators and chaos theory; central force motion; collisions and conservation laws; rigid body motion; and rotating coordinate systems. Possible examples of projects include projectile motion with air resistance; motion of a chaotic pendulum; and motion in a non-inertial reference frame. Prerequisite: 211 and 282 or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the QR graduation requirement. Normally offered every other year.
1030:MWF   TOME 213
PHYS 313-01 Computer Interfacing and Laboratory Instrumentation
Instructor: David Mertens
Course Description:
A study of the interfacing techniques needed for data acquisition and the control of laboratory equipment. An introduction to the LabView programming environment and how it can be used to automate typical laboratory tasks, for example, the control of linear or rotational actuators or the measurement and analysis of audio signals. Prerequisite: 213 or permission of instructor. Normally offered every other year.
1500:TF   TOME 217
PHYS 314-01 Energy & Environmental Physics
Instructor: Hans Pfister
Course Description:
A project-oriented approach to the study of the thermodynamics of fossil fuel engines and devices, the physics of solar and other alternative energy sources, energy conservation principles, the physics of nuclear fission reactors and nuclear fusion research, the physics of the atmosphere, air pollution, global climate change, and ozone depletion. Examples of projects include: energy conservation analysis, and the design, construction and testing of modern wind turbines or solar energy sources. Prerequisite: 131 and 132 or 141 and 142, and 212 or permission of instructor. This course fulfills the QR graduation requirement. Offered every two years.
0900:TR   TOME 101
PHYS 491-01 Senior Research Seminar
Instructor: Brett Pearson
Course Description:
Integration of theory and experiment in the conduct of research in contemporary physics or astrophysics, normally conducted in groups. The course emphasizes collaborative research, investigative techniques, and oral and written communication, and culminates in a colloquium presentation and a paper. Prerequisite: Physics major senior status. The two semester sequence (491 & 492 or 491 + Independent Research for candidates for honors in the major) are required for the major. This course fulfills the QR graduation requirement.
1330:W   TOME 213