Spring 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 101-01 Introduction to Philosophy
Instructor: Carol Hauptman
Course Description:
An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.
0930:MWF   DENNY 110
PHIL 102-01 Moral Problems
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
An introduction to ethics treating normative ethical theories and their philosophical underpinnings, with consideration of contemporary moral problems.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 106
PHIL 102-02 Moral Problems
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:
An introduction to ethics treating normative ethical theories and their philosophical underpinnings, with consideration of contemporary moral problems.
0930:MWF   STERN 103
PHIL 103-01 Logic
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
The study and practice of forms and methods of argumentation in ordinary and symbolic languages,focusing on elements of symbolic logic and critical reasoning, including analysis and assessment of arguments in English, symbolizing sentences and arguments,constructing formal proofs of validity in sentential and quantificational logic.Offered every semester, or every three out of four semesters.
1330:TF   DENNY 211
PHIL 103-02 Logic
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
The study and practice of forms and methods of argumentation in ordinary and symbolic languages,focusing on elements of symbolic logic and critical reasoning, including analysis and assessment of arguments in English, symbolizing sentences and arguments,constructing formal proofs of validity in sentential and quantificational logic.Offered every semester, or every three out of four semesters.
1030:MWF   DENNY 110
PHIL 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 180-01 and MEMS 200-05. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as POSC 180.
1130:MWF   DENNY 110
PHIL 180-02 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 180-02. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as POSC 180.
1330:MR   DENNY 103
PHIL 202-01 17th and 18th Century Philosophy
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
This course treats the Rationalists, Empiricists and Kant, with particular emphasis on issues in epistemology and metaphysics, such as the possibility and limits of human knowledge, the role of sense perception and reason in knowledge, the nature of substance, God and reality.Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   EASTC 102
PHIL 220-01 Biomedical Ethics
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PMGT 220-01. A study of ethical issues arising in the context of medical practice, biomedical research, and health related policy making, with focus on the ethical concepts, theories and reasoning methods developed to clarify and resolve these issues. Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as PMGT 220.
0900:TR   STERN 103
PHIL 253-01 Multiculturalism
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 206-01. How can ethnic minorities be incorporated into Western democracies as equal citizens? Must the state support the continuation of cultural practices and traditions? What if those practices conflict with the freedom and equality of members of minority groups, especially of women or children? These are among the most vexed and pressing issues for many democracies and a key part of recent debate in political theory. They raise major philosophical questions, such as how we can treat people as equals while respecting the differences between them and what the limits of toleration are. We will survey the main recent responses to these questions.
1330:MR   DENNY 211
PHIL 255-01 Philosophy of Law
Instructor: Douglas Edlin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 255-01. Fundamental problems of legal philosophy are considered, including the nature of law, the justification of legal authority, the relationship between legality and morality, the nature of judicial decision-making, theories of punishment, and/or issues involved in civil disobedience. Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as LAWP 255.
0930:MWF   DENNY 211
PHIL 256-01 Philosophy of Mind
Instructor: Jeffrey-Joseph Engelhardt
Course Description:
This course investigates the nature of the mind and its relation to the brain, body, and the surrounding world. Analyses of these topics will draw on information from fields such as psychology, neuroscience, cognitive science, or computer science. Prerequisite: one previous course in philosophy, or permission of the instructor.
1500:MR   EASTC 107
PHIL 261-01 Feminist Epistemology
Instructor: Jeffrey-Joseph Engelhardt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-03.This course considers the traditions of investigating social knowledge and social knowers. In contrast to the socially generic, isolated individual knowers in classical epistemology, feminist epistemology considers how one's social position influences what one may know or which epistemic virtues one is inclined to develop, how we depend on others to acquire knowledge and avoid error, and how communities can share resources conducive to knowledge-acquisition.
1500:TF   EASTC 300
PHIL 261-02 Sex
Instructor: Jeffrey-Joseph Engelhardt
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGSS 201-02.This course investigates sex, sexual activity, sexual orientations, and related philosophical topics. We'll consider questions such as, Is sex important? What is morally good sex, if there is such a thing? What is a sexual orientation? What roles should sex, sexual activity, and sexual orientation play in our lives?
1330:W   EASTC 300
PHIL 261-03 Philosophy of Psychiatry
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
What is mental illness? In what sense, exactly, can a mind be ill? And what sorts of conditions ought to count as mental illnesses? Beginning with these basic questions, this course will cover some of the most controversial and interesting issues in the philosophy of psychiatry. Among the particular conditions studied will be addiction, personality disorder, schizophrenia, dementia, and the autism spectrum.
1330:TF   EASTC 300
PHIL 261-04 Intermediate Logic
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
The big goal of this intermediate course in logic is to help you develop a technically and philosophically deep understanding of logical systems, especially classical logic. In the first three parts of the course, we will study the meta-theory of propositional logic and first-order logic. You will learn how to prove that a logical system is correct (or sound or consistent) and complete. In the fourth part of the course, we will reflect on the nature of logical implication by learning a bit of modal logic. This course counts as a 200-level elective for the Math major.
1330:MR   EASTC 301
PHIL 285-01 Justice in World Politics
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 208-01. An examination of how states ought to make ethical decisions about policies of global scope. Should asylum seekers and economic migrants be granted access to social services? How must states fight wars? How ought resources to be distributed between countries? We will explore the philosophical underpinnings of the arguments that have been developed in response to at least two of these questions. This course is cross-listed as POSC 208. Prerequisite: 180 or POSC 170, 180, or permission of the instructor.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
PHIL 302-01 Ethical Theory
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
Metaethics is a branch of moral philosophy the central questions of which concern the metaphysics, epistemology, and semantics of ethics. While philosophers have been asking these sorts of questions for many centuries, the discipline of metaethics is often thought to have begun with G. E. Moores Principia Ethica, published in 1903. So we'll begin with Moore, and then work our way through many of the major works, figures, and issues in metaethics since the beginning of the 20th century. This seminar will explore major issues or texts in classical or contemporary moral philosophy. Prerequisites: three prior courses in philosophy, at least two at the 200 level, or permission of the instructor. Offered at least once every two years.
1330:MR   EASTC 102
PHIL 391-01 Kierkegaard and Nietzsche
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Sren Kierkegaard and Friedrich Nietzsche were two of the most radical intellectual figures of the 19th century, and two of the most influential on the 20th. They have many things in common, including rollicking prose styles and a withering skepticism of the cultures out of which they themselves emerged. Kierkegaard was a hyper-religious thinker (his famous leap of faith), and Nietzsche a notorious religious skeptic ("God is dead"). These positions are not as far apart as they appear, believe it or not. We will closely read a few key texts of each, as well as slices of existentialism and post-structuralism that they influenced.
1330:T   EASTC 107
PHIL 500-01 Ethics of Medicine
Instructor: Amy McKiernan
Course Description:
 
PHIL 500-02 Philosophy of Health
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
 
PHIL 500-03 Greed: The End of Human Flourishing
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
 
PHIL 550-01 Metaphysics of Personal Identity
Instructor: Jeffrey-Joseph Engelhardt
Course Description:
 
PHIL 550-02 Knowledge & Society
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
 
PHIL 550-03 On Philosophical Remedies for Racism
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description: