Fall 2016

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 101-01 Intro to Philosophy
Instructor: Peter Seipel
Course Description:
An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.
1230:MWF   DENNY 110
PHIL 101-02 Intro to Philosophy
Instructor: Frank Boardman
Course Description:
An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.
1330:MR   ALTHSE 204
PHIL 102-01 Moral Problems
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
An introduction to ethics treating normative ethical theories and their philosophical underpinnings, with consideration of contemporary moral problems.
1030:MWF   EASTC 405
PHIL 103-01 Logic
Instructor: Frank Boardman
Course Description:
The study and practice of forms and methods of argumentation in ordinary and symbolic languages,focusing on elements of symbolic logic and critical reasoning, including analysis and assessment of arguments in English, symbolizing sentences and arguments,constructing formal proofs of validity in sentential and quantificational logic.Offered every semester, or every three out of four semesters.
1500:MR   DENNY 104
PHIL 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Harold Pohlman
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as POSC 180.
1500:TR   DENNY 21
PHIL 201-01 Ancient Philosophy
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
This course is an introduction to central questions, claims and arguments in ancient philosophy, centering on the work of Plato and Aristotle. Potential questions include: What is the value of reason and knowledge? What is knowledge? Is it always better to be just than unjust? What constitutes a good human life? What kind of thing is a human being?Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   EASTC 301
PHIL 210-01 Philosophy of Feminism
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
Critical examination of key issues concerning the status and roles of women and of the developing theories which describe and explain gender-related phenomena and prescribe change for the future. Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
1500:TF   EASTC 301
PHIL 215-01 Existentialism
Instructor: Jeffrey-Joseph Engelhardt
Course Description:
A study of existentialist thinkers, including Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Sartre, de Beauvoir, and Camus, who treat the human condition as irreducibly individual and yet philosophically communicable, and for whom the experience of the existing individual is of primary importance in issues ranging from one's relationship to God to the inevitability of death. Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor. Offered every two years.
1330:W   EASTC 301
PHIL 252-01 Philosophy of Art
Instructor: Frank Boardman
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 252-01. The discipline of aesthetics is primarily concerned with philosophical questions about art and beauty. This course will examine classic and contemporary Western discussions of such questions as, What is art? How can we determine what a work of art means? Are beauty and other aesthetic qualities subjective or objective? How should the quality of a work of art be assessed? Is there a general way to describe the creative process? What are the driving forces in the unfolding of art history? We will encounter such giants of the Western intellectual tradition as Plato, Aristotle, Hume, Kant, and Hegel, and also such contemporary figures as Arthur Danto, Richard Wollheim, and Kendall Walton. Prerequisite: one prior course in art history or philosophy or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as ARTH 252.
0900:TR   DENNY 304
PHIL 253-01 Social Philosophy
Instructor: Jeffrey-Joseph Engelhardt
Course Description:
This course investigates several intersections of philosophical theory and social injustice, oppression, and marginalization. We will consider how social injustice influences knowledge, the nature of social reality, and the determination of linguistic resources. We shall be concerned to understand how philosophical theories can help to articulate the lived experiences of the oppressed.
1500:MR   ALTHSE 110
PHIL 255-01 Philosophy of Law
Instructor: Douglas Edlin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LAWP 255-01. Fundamental problems of legal philosophy are considered, including the nature of law, the justification of legal authority, the relationship between legality and morality, the nature of judicial decision-making, theories of punishment, and/or issues involved in civil disobedience. Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as LAWP 255.
0930:MWF   DENNY 304
PHIL 261-01 Pain
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
In this course, we will explore philosophical and moral questions about pain. Does it make sense to say that I feel your pain? Can you have a pain you are not aware of? How do you know you are in pain? How do you know someone else is in pain? Are pains necessarily painful? What is the relation between the experience of pain and the body part you feel the pain in? Are pains primarily mental or brain events? Is an experience of pain an experience of an object? Is experiencing pain a kind of perception? To what extent should a philosophical theory of pain be required to accommodate the findings of neuroscience? Are pains necessarily bad? What moral obligation do we have to alleviate pain? We will grapple with these and other questions by delving into relevant readings, mostly recent, and hashing out the details in discussions and papers.
1500:MR   EASTC 300
PHIL 280-01 Recent Political Thought
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 202-01. This class aims to show the breadth and vitality of the field of political theory today. It does this by deepening and broadening the account of the discipline offered in POSC 180, discussing the most important recent accounts of justice, freedom, and equality, and adding consideration of democracy, rights, power, culture, community, and cosmopolitanism. We will also explore issues of exploitation and exclusion relating to gender, class, race, and human interaction with the natural environment, and consider how recent theorists have tried to challenge these practices. The class also explores the contours of political theory as an academic field of study, considering the disciplinary contributions of fields such as philosophy, political science, international relations, legal studies, and history, and major ideologies such as liberalism, conservatism, socialism, anarchism, and feminism. This course is cross-listed as POSC 202. Prerequisite: 180 or POSC 180, or permission of the instructor.
1330:MR   DENNY 103
PHIL 304-01 Philosophy of Language
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
What is the meaning of a word? How is it related to the thing or things it picks out? Can we provide a systematic account of the meaning of every sentence of a natural language (such as English, Japanese or Hebrew)? What is the relationship between what words mean and what we get across with them? In what sense, if at all, do we follow rules when we use language? This course is a seminar in which we will consider these sorts of questions among others. Prerequisites: three prior courses in philosophy, including 103 (Logic) and two at the 200 level, or permission of the instructor. Offered every two years.
1330:TF   EASTC 300
PHIL 401-01 Senior Seminar
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
A seminar focusing in depth on a selected philosophical topic, author or text with special emphasis on student philosophical writing and voice. Prerequisites: three prior courses in philosophy, at least one at the 300-level, or permission of the instructor.
1330:MR   EASTC 300
PHIL 550-01 Independent Research
Instructor: Jeffrey-Joseph Engelhardt
Course Description: