Spring 2014

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 101-01 Intro to Philosophy
Instructor: James Haile
Course Description:
An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 106
PHIL 102-01 Moral Problems
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
An introduction to ethics treating normative ethical theories and their philosophical underpinnings, with consideration of contemporary moral problems.
0930:MWF   DENNY 104
PHIL 102-02 Moral Problems
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
An introduction to ethics treating normative ethical theories and their philosophical underpinnings, with consideration of contemporary moral problems.
1130:MWF   DENNY 104
PHIL 103-01 Logic
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
The study and practice of forms and methods of argumentation in ordinary and symbolic languages,focusing on elements of symbolic logic and critical reasoning, including analysis and assessment of arguments in English, symbolizing sentences and arguments,constructing formal proofs of validity in sentential and quantificational logic.This course fulfills the DIV 1.a. distribution requirement and the QR graduation requirement. Offered every semester, or every three out of four semesters.
0930:MWF   EASTC 405
PHIL 202-01 17th and 18th Century Philosophy
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
This course treats the Rationalists, Empiricists and Kant, with particular emphasis on issues in epistemology and metaphysics, such as the possibility and limits of human knowledge, the role of sense perception and reason in knowledge, the nature of substance, God and reality.Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   EASTC 300
PHIL 204-01 American Philosophy
Instructor: James Haile
Course Description:
An introduction to major philosophical texts and themes originating in the United States in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This course will cover such thinkers as Emerson, James, Peirce, Dewey, and Santayana and themes such as naturalism, transcendentalism, in particular, pragmatism. Contemporary develpments in the American philosophical tradition may also be included.Prerequisites: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
1500:TF   EASTC 301
PHIL 220-01 Biomedical Ethics
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PMGT 220-01.
1030:MWF   EASTC 300
PHIL 252-01 Philosophy of Art
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ARTH 252-01.
1330:TF   WEISS 221
PHIL 254-01 Philosophy of Science
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
This course considers such issues as the distinction between science and non-science; the relation of evidence to scientific theories; truth and rationality in science; competition among theories; the nature of scientific explanation; methods of scientific thinking; the impact of science on society. Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
0900:TR   EASTC 300
PHIL 261-01 Moral Psychology
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
Examination of specific problem, author, text, or movement. Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
1500:MR   EASTC 406
PHIL 261-02 Anarchism
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-05. Though it has a rich history and a vibrant contemporary role, anarchism--or the view that there ought to be no government--is not an ideal that will be realized any time soon. Yet it provides a fundamental challenge in political philosophy; it presses its opponents to justify the existence and scope of state power from the ground up. We will examine individualist, communist, and postmodern anarchisms, looking at the works of such thinkers as William Godwin, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, Emma Goldman, and Michel Foucault.
1500:TF   DENNY 311
PHIL 270-01 Philosophy and Literature
Instructor: Alyssa DeBlasio
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENGL 329-01 and RUSS 270-01.
1330:TF   BOSLER 309
PHIL 304-01 Philosophy of Language
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
What is the meaning of a word? How is it related to the thing or things it picks out? Can we provide a systematic account of the meaning of every sentence of a natural language (such as English, Japanese or Hebrew)? What is the relationship between what words mean and what we get across with them? In what sense, if at all, do we follow rules when we use language? This course is a seminar in which we will consider these sorts of questions among others. Prerequisites: three prior courses in philosophy, including 103 (Logic) and two at the 200 level, or permission of the instructor. This course fulfills the DIV 1.a. distribution requirement and the WR graduation requirement. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   EASTC 406
PHIL 391-01 Philosophy and Self Knowledge
Instructor: James Haile
Course Description:
A seminar focusing on a significant philosophical issue, text or philosopher. Prerequisites: three prior courses in philosophy, at least two at the 200 level, or permission of the instructor.This course fulfills the WR requirement.
1330:W   EASTC 212
PHIL 500-01 Ascribing Moral and Legal Responsibility to Juveniles
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
 
PHIL 550-01 Analysis of Resentment and the Natural Reactive Attitudes
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description: