Spring 2017

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
PHIL 101-01 Intro to Philosophy
Instructor: Frank Boardman
Course Description:
An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.
1030:MWF   DENNY 110
PHIL 101-02 Intro to Philosophy
Instructor: Jeffrey-Joseph Engelhardt
Course Description:
An introduction to Western philosophy through an examination of problems arising in primary sources. How major philosophers in the tradition have treated such questions as the scope of human reason, the assumptions of scientific method, the nature of moral action, or the connections between faith and reason.
1230:MWF   DENNY 110
PHIL 102-01 Moral Problems
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
An introduction to ethics treating normative ethical theories and their philosophical underpinnings, with consideration of contemporary moral problems.
1030:MWF   DENNY 104
PHIL 103-01 Logic
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
The study and practice of forms and methods of argumentation in ordinary and symbolic languages,focusing on elements of symbolic logic and critical reasoning, including analysis and assessment of arguments in English, symbolizing sentences and arguments,constructing formal proofs of validity in sentential and quantificational logic.Offered every semester, or every three out of four semesters.
0930:MWF   EASTC 405
PHIL 103-02 Logic
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
The study and practice of forms and methods of argumentation in ordinary and symbolic languages,focusing on elements of symbolic logic and critical reasoning, including analysis and assessment of arguments in English, symbolizing sentences and arguments,constructing formal proofs of validity in sentential and quantificational logic.Offered every semester, or every three out of four semesters.
0900:TR   DENNY 104
PHIL 180-01 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 180-01. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as POSC 180.
1130:MWF   DENNY 104
PHIL 180-02 Political Philosophy
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 180-02. An introduction to the history of political thought, focused on such problems as the nature of justice, the meaning of freedom, the requirements of equality, the prevalence of moral dilemmas in political life, the question of whether we ought to obey the law, and the importance of power in politics. We will also discuss how these issues continue to resonate today.This course is cross-listed as POSC 180.
1330:MR   DENNY 103
PHIL 202-01 17th and 18th Century Philosophy
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
This course treats the Rationalists, Empiricists and Kant, with particular emphasis on issues in epistemology and metaphysics, such as the possibility and limits of human knowledge, the role of sense perception and reason in knowledge, the nature of substance, God and reality.Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
1030:TR   EASTC 102
PHIL 253-01 Contemporary Anarchism
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
Anarchist political theory is perhaps in its most fertile period since the early 20th century. We will examine developments in anarchist philosophy and social science by figures such as James Scott, Pierre Clastres, and David Graeber; political theory by A. John Simmons and Michael Huemer; postmodern material by Todd May and Hakim Bey; and writings of Noam Chomsky. We will also examine the role of anarchism in recent developments such as Occupy, anti-globalization and anti-austerity movements, environmentalism, and the arts.
1330:TF   EASTC 300
PHIL 261-01 Evil
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
Can people be evil? Can our actions be evil? If no, why not? And if yes, how so? These are the main questions that well attempt to answer in this course. For the first part of the course, well discuss various reasons for being skeptical of evil. Then well treat evil as a topic in moral psychology, asking what kinds of psychological features purportedly evil people and actions have in common. And finally, well examine a number of philosophical theories of evil.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 110
PHIL 261-02 Racism & Racial Injustice
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
In the United States, slavery was outlawed 151 years ago; segregated schools were ruled unconstitutional 62 years ago; discrimination in hiring was outlawed 52 years ago; and a black person has been president for nearly eight years. However, grave inequalities between black Americans and white Americans persist. Why? Racism, many are tempted to say. What exactly is racism? Is it simply anything that results in racial inequality? Does racism require intention? Does it require antipathy? Does it require harm? Although its tempting to say that racism is the cause of all racial inequality, are there other important causes? When does a racial inequality qualify as a racial injustice? Think now about race. Dont need there need to be races if there is racism? What are races anyway? Are they real, or just social constructions? This course is an introduction to thinking philosophically about racism and racial injustice.
0900:TR   BOSLER 314
PHIL 261-03 Philosophy of Cognitive Science
Instructor: Jeffrey-Joseph Engelhardt
Course Description:
Examination of specific problem, author, text, or movement. Prerequisite: one prior course in philosophy or permission of the instructor.
1500:MR   EASTC 102
PHIL 261-04 Modern Moral Philosophy
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
This course examines some of the major theories, issues, and debates in moral philosophy during the 17th and 18th centuries. In addition to such major figures as Thomas Hobbes, David Hume, and Jeremy Bentham, well read and discuss the work of lesser-known figures like Samuel Clarke, Joseph Butler, and Thomas Reid.
1330:MR   EASTC 212
PHIL 261-05 Truth & Paradox
Instructor: Frank Boardman
Course Description:
Nothing is so fundamental to philosophy (or intellectual pursuits in general) as truth. And yet just what truth is is itself a difficult philosophical question. Well begin this course by looking at some significant theories of truth. Then well consider some contextual issues (such as truth in fiction and counterfactuals) along with some of the laws that allegedly govern our thinking about truth. Next well turn our attention to paradoxes, those troubling (and often fun!) puzzles that seem to test the boundaries of reason and our intuitive understanding of truth. Well conclude by considering some approaches in Eastern and Western philosophy to the problem of paradox.
1230:MWF   EASTC 301
PHIL 270-01 Philosophy and Literature
Instructor: Alyssa DeBlasio
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RUSS 270-01 and ENGL 329-0. Taught in English Dostoevsky's characters lie, steal, scheme, and murder. What is it about Dostoevsky's depictions of their lying, cheating ways that makes his novels not just literary but philosophical? And what is it about philosophical works like Kierkegaard's and Nietzsche's that makes them literary? More generally, where do the overlapping realms of literature and philosophy begin and end? This course investigates the intersections of philosophy and literature across different schools of thought, paying special attention to the work of Dostoevsky, Kierkegaard, Leibniz, Plato, Tolstoy, Voltaire, and others. We will pair the treatment of philosophical issues in fiction with their treatment in more traditional philosophical genres, thereby raising and discussing the contentious question of whether philosophy can achieve things that literature cannot, and vice versa. Prerequisite: one course in PHIL or permission of the instructor. Offered every two years. This course is cross-listed as RUSS 270 and ENGL 329.
1330:MR   BOSLER 313
PHIL 285-01 Justice in World Politics
Instructor: Jason Reiner
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 208-01. An examination of how states ought to make ethical decisions about policies of global scope. Should asylum seekers and economic migrants be granted access to social services? How must states fight wars? How ought resources to be distributed between countries? We will explore the philosophical underpinnings of the arguments that have been developed in response to at least two of these questions. This course is cross-listed as POSC 208. Prerequisite: 180 or POSC 170, 180, or permission of the instructor.
1500:TF   DENNY 211
PHIL 303-01 Epistemology
Instructor: Jeffrey-Joseph Engelhardt
Course Description:
This seminar will probe key issues in epistemology, such as: the nature of knowledge and justification, the challenge of skepticism, the relation of sense perception to conceptual thought. Prerequisites: three prior courses in philosophy, at least two at the 200 level, or permission of the instructor.
1500:TF   EASTC 212
PHIL 391-01 Kant: The Critique of Pure Reason
Instructor: Susan Feldman
Course Description:
Kants Critique of Pure Reason aims to prove how knowledge of objects, and of ourselves, is philosophically possible, and to do so, takes on Humes sceptical conclusion about causality, as well as Descartes unsatisfactory resolution of scepticism about the external world. Knowledge, Kant famously tells us in the opening of the book, starts from sense experience but does not rest upon it; rather, the human mind plays an active role in forming the objective world. In this seminar, we will confront Kants views through close reading of the text and detailed analysis of his arguments, and explore their relevance to contemporary philosophical controversies.
1330:W   EASTC 212
PHIL 500-01 Moral Psychology: Mental Illness, Responsibility, and Blame
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
 
PHIL 500-02 Political Theory
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description:
 
PHIL 500-03 After Virtue Analysis
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
 
PHIL 500-04 Philosophy Study
Instructor: James Sias
Course Description:
 
PHIL 500-05 Ethics of Counter Terrorism
Instructor: Chauncey Maher
Course Description:
 
PHIL 550-01 Metaphysics of Divine Action
Instructor: Jeffrey-Joseph Engelhardt
Course Description:
 
PHIL 550-02 Conjoined Twinning: Answers from Animalism
Instructor: Crispin Sartwell
Course Description: