Spring 2016

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
ARBI 102-01 Elementary Arabic
Instructor: Magda Siekert
Course Description:
Continued introduction to MSA with more advanced development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through a greater degree of interaction in the classroom. Prerequisite: 101.
0830:MTWRF   DENNY 104
ARBI 102-02 Elementary Arabic
Instructor: Magda Siekert
Course Description:
Continued introduction to MSA with more advanced development of speaking, listening, reading and writing skills through a greater degree of interaction in the classroom. Prerequisite: 101.
0930:MTWRF   DENNY 104
ARBI 202-01 Intermediate Arabic
Instructor: Mohammad Abu Shuleh
Course Description:
Continued development of conversation and composition skills using current political and social events, stories, essays, and other materials as the topics for discussion and writing assignments. Prerequisite: 201. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
0930:MTWRF   DENNY 103
ARBI 202-02 Intermediate Arabic
Instructor: Mohammad Abu Shuleh
Course Description:
Continued development of conversation and composition skills using current political and social events, stories, essays, and other materials as the topics for discussion and writing assignments. Prerequisite: 201. This course fulfills the language graduation requirement.
1030:MTWRF   DENNY 103
ARBI 360-01 Topics in Advanced Arabic
Instructor: Mohammad Abu Shuleh
Course Description:
This course is for students who have completed Arabic 212 and at least one additional course in Media Arabic. Most students will have completed two courses following Arabic 212 in a study abroad program, and will be at the intermediate high/advanced low level as measured by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). The course seeks to improve the overall Arabic skills of the student to understand authentic texts and broadcasts in Arabic, and to engage in a discussion of the content. More specifically, the course will teach Arabic through content focused on diplomacy and international affairs with a goal to advance the student's understanding of both the content and linguistic skills involved in speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Students will be assigned long passages to read, summarize and present the main ideas in class; listening activities with questions to answer and share; group presentations, debates and role-play; and individual projects. Students will develop the ability to narrate in major time frames, compare and contrast, and express an opinion. The class will be conducted primarily in Modern Standard Arabic -- use of English will be discouraged and used minimally.
1330:MR   DENNY 103
Courses Offered in HEBR
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HEBR 102-01 Elementary Modern Hebrew
Instructor: Daniela Tomer
Course Description:
Introduction to the modern Hebrew language. Alphabet, phonics and grammatical structures. Emphasizes development of reading comprehension, composition and conversational skills.Prerequisite: 101 or the equivalent.
0930:MTWRF   EASTC 212
Courses Offered in MEST
Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
MEST 122-01 Middle East since 1750
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 122-01. Bureaucratic-military reforms of the 19th century in Egypt and the Ottoman Empire, European imperialism, regional nationalisms, contemporary autocratic regimes, and the politicization of religion.This course is cross-listed as HIST 122.
1130:MWF   DENNY 211
MEST 200-01 The Crusades
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 213-01. While warfare has always played an important role in Western life, beginning in the latter part of the eleventh century, there emerged new ideas about the purpose of war, against whom it should properly be conducted, and its importance for those who engaged in it. Referred to as the crusades, these wars were presented as a moral and righteous struggle against the enemies of God. Indeed, as a holy undertaking, the crusades were not merely justified, but justifying and spiritually beneficial for those who participated in them. By reading primary sources from the four groups involved in the crusades Western Christians, Jews, Byzantine Greeks, and Moslems we shall address a number of questions about this phenomenon. What, if anything did the crusades achieve? Was the Church and Christianity improved or harmed by its involvement in the crusades? Does extreme idealism inevitably lead to extreme intolerance and fanaticism?
1500:TR   DENNY 311
MEST 200-02 Politics of Oil, Arms, Peace & War: U.S./Russia/Middle East Relations in the 20th & 21st C
Instructor: Joseph McGinnis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-05, POSC 290-06 and RUSS 260-01.Taught in English. From the time of the First World War the United States and Russia have been drawn into the Middle East economically, militarily, and politically. This course will examine those forces and the origins and results of a 100-year relationship, at times cooperative, but for the most part, confrontational. Oil has been a dominant factor, but religion, competition for influence, historic ties, and 65-plus years of Arab-Israeli tensions are equally important. We will review the history and politics of the relationship, using case studies where appropriate, including the 1973 Arab-Israeli War, when the U.S. and the Soviet Union almost came to blows placing their respective nuclear forces on alert. Where possible, the course will draw on individuals with experience in the region to share their expertise and first-hand knowledge of major events such as the Middle East Peace Process.
1330:MR   BOSLER 208
MEST 200-03 Israel the Start-up Nation
Instructor: Anat Beck
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 300-09 and JDST 216-03.Israel has originated more companies on the New York Stock Exchange than any other nation besides the United States and China. It enjoys the largest established venture-capital industry outside Silicon Valley (with $4 billion investments annually), high rates of innovation, growth, and new firm formation. This course will explore the economic miracle that Israel experienced in 2000. How did Israel transform its economy from a global basket case, whose market focused primarily on agriculture and artillery, with an inflation rate of 500% per year and the worlds record largest foreign debt per capita of $21 billion, into a high-tech powerhouse? We will discuss the ways in which Israel was able to revolutionize its market so that Tel Aviv trumped Boston as the urban area with the most venture activity following San Francisco. The course will be based on multiple teaching methods. Theoretical presentations will be used, as well as discussions of readings from academic journals, movies and guests lecturers. There will also be a session on creativity and innovation, where each student will be able to examine her entrepreneurial orientation and intentions.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 201
MEST 233-01 U.S. Public Diplomacy in the Arab World
Instructor: Magda Siekert
Course Description:
This course introduces the students to the theory and practice of U.S. public diplomacy in the Arab world from a historical and a comparative perspective, looking at past challenges, successes and failures. The course examines the role of public diplomacy in the context of U.S. strategic interests in the region, U.S. efforts to promote democratic governance in the Arab world through the use of public diplomacy tools including traditional and new media, cultural exchanges, and educational programs. Students will debate whether public diplomacy should be integrated into the policy-making process, and how it could complement traditional diplomacy and advance political, military, and economic policies.
1330:T   DENNY 103
MEST 259-01 Islam
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 259-01 and RELG 259-01. An introduction to Islamic beliefs and practices in their classical forms: rituals, law, mysticism, and other topics. The course will consider aspects of Islamic cultures and societies in medieval and modern times. This course is cross-listed as HIST 372 and RELG 259.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
MEST 260-01 Media & Politics in the Middle East & North Africa
Instructor: Edward Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 260-01. Together we will try to answer the questions: What roles do media technologies and practices (particularly new digital technologies) play in the politics of Middle Eastern and North African (MENA) countries? How do states respond to the challenges and opportunities presented by changes in the communication ecosphere? We will study the development of mass media and its regulation in the MENA region. Students will collaborate to produce presentations for the class on particular problems in the role of media in politics and society, and will also complete individual critical and reflective works. The class will make extensive use of digital and social media, seeking to understand their political and social impact partly through first-hand experience.This course is cross-listed as POSC 260. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   DENNY 304
MEST 550-01 Byzantine Alliances With the West
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
 
MEST 550-02 Muslim Anti-Christian Polemic
Instructor: Theodore Pulcini
Course Description: