Fall 2014

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Kristine Mitchell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-01.
1030:MWF   DENNY 311
INST 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Robert Musgrave
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-02.
0930:MWF   DENNY 110
INST 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Robert Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-03.
1330:R   DENNY 317
INST 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-01.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 207
INST 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-02.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 207
INST 277-01 International Politics of the Middle East
Instructor: Edward Webb
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 266-01 and POSC 277-01.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 110
INST 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Douglas Stuart
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 280-01.
0900:TR   ALTHSE 110
INST 282-01 Diplomatic History of the United States
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 282-01.
1330:TR   DENNY 110
INST 290-01 Global Health
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with PMGT 290-01. This course will focus on a) historical cases of major diseases and epidemics around the world; b) look at the current burden and distribution of disease and mortality around the world and in multiple dimensions by geography, social class, race, and gender; c) try to understand the determinants of global health disparities; and d) understand the development of global health policies, and outcomes of global health interventions.
1230:MWF   DENNY 103
INST 290-02 International Terrorism
Instructor: Anthony Williams
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-02. This course will cover the global war on terrorism, its origins, its characteristics, and the ends, ways and means of the participants. We will begin by seeking to arrive at a working definition of terrorism. We will examine various historic case studies in an effort to identify common characteristics of terrorist activity, terrorist motivations, the origins of today's terrorist movements, and a general typology of terrorism. We will focus on specific "types" of terrorist activity as those types manifest themselves in the global war on terrorism. We will address the catastrophic events of September 11, 2001 and their impact on the national security of the United States. Finally, we will examine the current strategy of the United States in the global war on terrorism, and its implications and challenges.
1500:MR   DENNY 103
INST 290-03 Global Environmental Challenges and Governance
Instructor: Cornelius Leary
Course Description:
Permission of Instructor Required.Cross-listed with SUST 330-01 and ENST 311-07.Part of the Global Climate Change Mosaic.
0930:MWF   KAUF 178
INST 290-04 International Development
Instructor: Shamma Alam
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 214-02. This course will cover the main topics that are covered in traditional development classes, which include agricultural/subsistence household issues, credit constraints in poor country setttings, issues related to education, child labor, migration, population, and health, and also potential development and sustainability problems that we are going to face because of climate change.
1030:MWF   DENNY 317
INST 290-05 Media & National Security: How Reporting Can Change Policy, and Sometimes, History
Instructor: Kimberly Dozier
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-06. Journalists deliver the first draft of history, informing the public, policymakers, the business world and beyond. They drive public opinion, politics, policy and business at home and abroad. Their reports can help fuel debate, trigger diplomatic conflict or pressure competing sides into talking peace. But when you read "a U.S. official said," do you know the rules governing how that information was given out? Do you understand how a single news report can trigger a change in policy on Capitol Hill, or the firing of a top official at the White House, or the shifting in strategy and tactics of a multiyear, multibillion-dollar war? Explore case studies from Vietnam to Kosovo, Iraq to Afghanistan, WikiLeaks to the NSA's Edward Snowden, and meet some of those delivering the news.
0900:TR   DENNY 303
INST 290-06 The Environment, Conflict and Peace
Instructor: Michael Beevers
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 311-08. Despite the fact that most of the world's seven billion people are living longer, consuming more and getting better educated, many people on the planet have paradoxically become much less secure due to the scale of consumption and pollution in today's carbon-based societies. Global environmental hanges - deforestation, losses of biodiversity, land degradation, the depletion of fish stocks, water pollution and scarcity, toxic contamination and climate change -- are felt worldwide and the sites of esource consumption are located a world away the sites of resource extraction. This course examines the two most prominent ways in which global environmental change undermines human security. First, we will focus on how environmental change may induce conflict because violent conflict is a powerful source of human insecurity. Second, we will examine the ways in which environmental change undermines human security by putting at risk people's basic needs, human rights and the things they value in order to lead dignified lives. Examining the links between environmental change and human security allows us to examine questions of human vulnerability, the dynamics of conflict, cooperation and peace, equity and justice and sustainable development. The class will engage with academic debates in the field along with practical, policy relevant information.
0900:TR   TOME 117
INST 290-07 Energy & Global Politics
Instructor: Robert Musgrave
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-07. Does oil cause war? Do energy-producing countries develop differently than energy-consuming ones? Will the advent of alternative energy sources make global politics and economics more stable? In this course, we look at the past, present, and future of the global energy market and its effects on global politics--and vice versa. Our goal is to understand the theories that political scientists and students of international relations have developed to answer these questions and to help you prepare for coming transformations in the way the world works.
1500:MW   DENNY 203
INST 401-01 U.S. Grand Strategy
Instructor: Douglas Stuart
Course Description:
This senior seminar is designed to give students opportunities to discuss American grand strategy and the processes by which US foreign policy and national security policy are formulated and managed.
1330:W   ALTHSE 206
INST 401-02 The End of Unipolarity? Causes and Consequences
Instructor: Kristine Mitchell
Course Description:
What has happened to American power in the two decades since the international system became unipolar, and what is likely to happen to it in the future? The question has far-reaching implications for international and domestic security, the global economy, U.S. foreign policy, and interstate relations. In this senior research seminar we will explore the scholarly debate about U.S. power, the nature and future of unipolarity, and the challenges that the U.S. faces in maintaining a dominant international position. Students will complete a research project that examines the shifting distribution of international power in the context of their area of concentration in the International Studies major.
1330:W   ALTHSE 08
INST 401-03 Globalization, Sustainability and Security: Whole of Society Approaches
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
In the 2010 National Security Strategy of the United States, President Obama articulates the need for whole of society approaches to tackling tough transnational issues. Furthermore, some experts believe that in the decades ahead, global governance will be a characterized by complexity and ambiguity, with governance structures reflecting the influence of states, NGOs, IGOs, for-profit companies, and other agents. In this seminar, we will investigate collaborative approaches to addressing national and transnational security related matters, especially those that are rooted in the economic, environmental, and social dimensions of sustainable development.
1330:W   ALTHSE 207
INST 550-01 The Changing Nature of the National Guard
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description: