Fall 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
INST 170-01 International Relations
Instructor: Robert Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-01. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
1500:MR   TOME 115
INST 170-02 International Relations
Instructor: Nina Barzachka
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-02. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
1130:MWF   DENNY 110
INST 170-03 International Relations
Instructor: Nina Barzachka
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 170-03. An introduction to global politics which examines the interaction of states, international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and individuals in the world arena. Topics covered include traditional concerns such as war, balance of power, the UN and international law along with the more recent additions to the agenda of world politics such as international terrorism, human rights, and economic globalization. This course is cross-listed as POSC 170.
1230:MWF   DENNY 110
INST 200-01 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-01. Concentration upon strategies pursued by nation states in their interaction with international business enterprises and nongovernmental organizations. Students will work from an interdisciplinary perspective, with case studies of episodes in U.S. economic history and of selected countries from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America. To facilitate their analysis, students will study concepts drawn from trade theory, commercial and industrial policy, balance of payments accounting, exchange rate determination, and open-economy macroeconomics. As such, the course will draw heavily from the introductory economics courses. This approach will help develop an appreciation for the complex environment in which both political leaders and corporate managers operate. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
0930:MWF   ALTHSE 207
INST 200-02 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-02. Concentration upon strategies pursued by nation states in their interaction with international business enterprises and nongovernmental organizations. Students will work from an interdisciplinary perspective, with case studies of episodes in U.S. economic history and of selected countries from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America. To facilitate their analysis, students will study concepts drawn from trade theory, commercial and industrial policy, balance of payments accounting, exchange rate determination, and open-economy macroeconomics. As such, the course will draw heavily from the introductory economics courses. This approach will help develop an appreciation for the complex environment in which both political leaders and corporate managers operate. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
1030:MWF   ALTHSE 207
INST 200-03 Global Economy
Instructor: Michael Fratantuono
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INBM 200-03. Concentration upon strategies pursued by nation states in their interaction with international business enterprises and nongovernmental organizations. Students will work from an interdisciplinary perspective, with case studies of episodes in U.S. economic history and of selected countries from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America. To facilitate their analysis, students will study concepts drawn from trade theory, commercial and industrial policy, balance of payments accounting, exchange rate determination, and open-economy macroeconomics. As such, the course will draw heavily from the introductory economics courses. This approach will help develop an appreciation for the complex environment in which both political leaders and corporate managers operate. Prerequisite: ECON 111 and 112; concurrent enrollment in ECON 112 by permission of the instructor. This course is cross-listed as INBM 200.
1230:MWF   ALTHSE 207
INST 260-01 History of International Relations
Instructor: Robert Nation
Course Description:
This course is designed to give students an opportunity to apply theories of international relations to major events and issues in world history. Concepts such as balance of power, appeasement and imperialism will be studied against the backdrop of world historical events such as the Congress of Vienna, World War II, and the Algerian War. Prerequisite: INST 170 or POSC 170.
1330:MR   STUART 1104
INST 270-01 European Union
Instructor: Nina Barzachka
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 270-01. The European Union (EU) remains a work-in-progress, and this course will help students to contextualize the EU's development since the mid-1950s, understand the way that it currently functions, and think about how it is likely to evolve in the future. Substantively, the course covers the theory and history of European integration; the EU's unusual ( and evolving) institutional structure and political processes; the major policy areas of the EU; and the power dynamics between the EU and its member states. This course is cross-listed as POSC 270.
1500:TF   DENNY 211
INST 272-01 International Terrorism
Instructor: Anthony Williams
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 272-01. This course provides a historic overview of international terrorism, its origins, evolution, characteristics, and the strategies of the participants. Starting with a clear definition of terrorism, the course will examine various historic case studies in an effort to identify common characteristics of terrorist activity, terrorist motivations, the origins of today's terrorist movements, and a general typology of terrorism. Studies will focus on specific "types" of terrorist activity as those types manifest themselves in the world today. The catastrophic events of September 11, 2001 and their impact on the national security of the United States will be the subject of several lessons. Finally, this course will examine the current strategies in the international struggle against terrorism, and their implications and challenges.This course is cross-listed as POSC 272.
1500:MR   DENNY 110
INST 280-01 American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Robert Nation
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 280-01. A survey of U.S. foreign policy. American approaches to such issues as containment, detente, arms control, deterrence, international law, and third world economic development will be discussed. Students will also address issues of U.S. foreign policy formulation, including the roles of the public, Congress, and the president in the foreign policy process. Prerequisite: POSC 170 or INST 170. This course is cross-listed as POSC 280.
1030:TR   DENNY 110
INST 290-01 U.S. - Middle East Relations
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with HIST 215-01 and MEST 200-01. This course examines the history of US-Middle East relations from the Barbary Wars to the present. Topics will include American travel and missionary activity in the Holy Land during the 1800s; the American role in post-World War I diplomacy affecting the Middle East; rivalry with the Soviet Union; Arab-Israeli diplomacy; petroleum policy; anti-American terrorism; and military interventions.
1500:TF   DENNY 203
INST 290-02 Gender and Development
Instructor: Mesude Kongar
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ECON 314-01 and WGSS 302-01. This course examines the gender dimensions of economic development and globalization from the perspective of feminist economics. This perspective implies foregrounding labor, broadly defined to include paid and unpaid work, and examining gender differences in work, access to resources, and wellbeing outcomes, and how these are affected by macroeconomic policies and how gender inequalities are relevant for societal wellbeing. Since the early 1980s economic globalization has been achieved on the basis of a common set of macroeconomic policies pursued in industrial and developing countries alike. These policies frame both the gender-differentiated impacts of policy and the initiatives that are implemented to reduce inequalities between men and women. The main objective of the course is to examine the impact of these policies on men and women in the global South (a.k.a. developing countries/Third World) on gender inequalities and to evaluate the policies/strategies for reducing gender inequalities and promoting the well-being of all people. The pursuit of these objectives will entail first a brief examination of the central tenets of feminist economics and an historical overview of the policy-oriented field of gender and development. Gender-differentiated statistics will be reviewed as they pertain to the topics under discussion.
1030:TR   ALTHSE 206
INST 290-03 A New Cold War? 21st Century Russian Foreign Policy and Russia’s Relations with the West
Instructor: Robert Hamilton
Course Description:
Cross-listed with POSC 290-04 and RUSS 260-01. This course will examine current Russian foreign policy and Russias relationship with the West, especially NATO and EU countries. The course begins with a brief historical survey of the Cold War relationship between the Soviet Union and the West. It then traces the development of Russias relationship with the West from the collapse of the Soviet Union until the present day. The third section of the course examines current Russian foreign policy and geopolitical theory, beginning with Russian policy in its self-described Near Abroad, moving to Russias role in the wider Eurasian region, and ending with an examination of Russias place in the international system. An overarching theme of the third section of the course is how Russia and the West interact in each of these areas. The course concludes with a discussion of whether Russian-Western relations can be described as a new Cold War, and how the two parties can best manage their relationship to prevent misperception and miscalculation from leading to conflict between them. Taught in English
1500:TR   BOSLER 314
INST 290-04 Social Movements, Social Media and Global Change
Instructor: Jacob Jacob
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FMST 320-02 and SOCI 230-03.Just as the printing press and the early public spheres created the tools and the space for the rise of nationalist and religious movements in 16th century Europe, new communication technologies and social media have created both the space and the tools for the rise of social movements in contemporary society. Movements such as the Arab Spring, the Kony 2012 campaign, #BlackLivesMatter, #BringBackOurGirls among others have drawn on social media to mobilize and organize popular interventions in the public sphere. This course is a conceptual and applied exploration of the complex interactions between the ecologies of social movements and social media, within the context of an increasingly globalized public sphere. In addition to studying these interactions, students work in teams to develop authentic social movement campaigns on issues they care about. The course climaxes with students presenting their campaigns to a college audience.
1030:TR   DENNY 212
INST 401-01 Global Futures
Instructor: Russell Bova
Course Description:
Early post-Cold War era optimism about a future of increasing democracy, prosperity, and peace has given way in recent years to concerns about resurgent authoritarianism, global economic instability, and even the prospect of major power war. This seminar will examine and debate various images of the global future through reading and discussion of a series of provocative books and articles that attempt to assess the trajectory of current global trends. Those readings will be selected with an eye toward reinforcing and deepening your understanding of each of the core areas of the IS major-- IR theory, US foreign policy, international economics, and even diplomatic history ("what's past is prologue"), with applicability to all of the concentrations pursued by IS majors.
1330:T   ALTHSE 201
INST 401-02 Empire
Instructor: Edward Webb
Course Description:
Empires may seem to belong to history, but they have shaped todays political order and globalizing economy. Few parts of the world have been untouched by empire. Some argue that the United States is or should be an empire, whether they see it as benign or malign. What does empire mean today? Participants will critically assess diverse materials to come to their own conclusions about the analytical utility of the concept of empire, and how they can best apply it to understand issues that matter in world politics today. Students will produce research papers examining how empire affects their areas of specialization, in preparation for discussion at the oral examination in the spring.
1330:W   ALTHSE 109
INST 401-03 Issues in American Foreign Policy
Instructor: Douglas Stuart
Course Description:
This Senior seminar is designed to give students an opportunity to discuss past, present and future issues in US foreign policy. Among the topics to be discussed are: US grand strategy, civil-military relations, and US policies in the Indo-Asia-Pacific and Europe.
1330:W   ALTHSE 110