Fall 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 105-01 Medieval Europe
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEMS 200-09. This survey course will study the development of European civilization during the period ca.300 to 1300. It will consider the impact of such events as the decline of the Roman Empire, the Germanic invasions, the development of Christianity and the Church, the emergence of feudalism, the expansion of Islam and the Crusades, and the creation of romantic literature.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
HIST 107-01 Modern Europe, 1789-2000
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
We know that we live in a modern society, but what does it mean to be modern? The course will examine the changing relationship between state and society, the growth of nationalism, the industrial revolution, liberalism, imperialism, socialism, fascism, secularization, urbanization, warfare, gender roles, the arts, and more. These topics allow us to understand many present-day problems in Europeand much of the rest of the world--including ethnic and national tensions, economic and gender inequality, refugee crises, global economic and political competition, minority rights, environmental degradation and many other topics.
0930:MWF   DENNY 203
HIST 117-01 American History 1607 to 1877
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
This course covers colonial, revolutionary, and national America through Reconstruction. Include attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
0830:MWF   DENNY 203
HIST 117-02 American History 1607 to 1877
Instructor: Lindsay Houpt-Varner
Course Description:
This course covers colonial, revolutionary, and national America through Reconstruction. Include attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
1030:MWF   DENNY 313
HIST 118-01 American History 1877 to Present
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
This course covers aspects of political evolution, foreign policy development, industrialization, urbanization, and the expanding roles of 20th century central government. Includes attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
1500:MR   DENNY 313
HIST 121-01 Middle East to 1750
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 121-01. The rise of Islam, the development of Islamic civilization in medieval times and its decline relative to Europe in the early modern era, 1500-1750. This course is cross-listed as MEST 121.
1230:MWF   DENNY 212
HIST 131-01 Modern Latin American History since 1800
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 231-01. Introduction to Latin American history since independence and the consolidation of national states to the recent past. Students explore social, economic, and political developments from a regional perspective as well as specific national examples. This course is cross-listed as LALC 231.
0900:TR   DENNY 110
HIST 170-01 African Civilizations to 1850
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 170-01. This course provides an overview to the political, social, and ecological history of Africa. We will examine the peopling of the continent, the origins of agriculture, the growth of towns and the development of metal technology. Written sources before the 1400s are almost nonexistent for most of Africa, and so we will use archaeological and linguistic sources. The geographic focus of the course will be the Middle Nile, Aksum in Ethiopia, the Sudanic states in West Africa, Kongo in Central Africa, the Swahili states of the East African coast, and Zimbabwe and KwaZulu in Southern Africa. We will also examine the Atlantic Slave Trade and the colonization of the Cape of Good Hope.This course is cross-listed as AFST 170.
0930:MWF   DENNY 313
HIST 204-01 Introduction to Historical Methodology
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.
1330:W   LIBRY ARCHCLS
HIST 215-01 U.S. - Middle East Relations
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 290-01 and MEST 200-01. This course examines the history of US-Middle East relations from the Barbary Wars to the present. Topics will include American travel and missionary activity in the Holy Land during the 1800s; the American role in post-World War I diplomacy affecting the Middle East; rivalry with the Soviet Union; Arab-Israeli diplomacy; petroleum policy; anti-American terrorism; and military interventions.
1500:TF   DENNY 203
HIST 215-02 History of Modern Japan 1800 to the Present
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-03. This course explores two centuries of successive transformations that have restructured Japanese society. Key topics include Japans transition from a feudal to a capitalist regime, the expansion of the Japanese empire, the Second World War, the post-war economic miracle, and recent political and economic anxieties as well as hope for the future. We will examine a range of engrossing primary sources and thought-provoking secondary scholarship to understand how geopolitical strategies and economic booms and busts have affected the daily lives of people in Japan, East Asia, and the rest of the modern world.
0900:TR   DENNY 303
HIST 215-03 Modern N. Africa from French Invasion to Arab Spring
Instructor: Burleigh Hendrickson, David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01 and MEST 200-02. In spite of its unique geographic position as a trade hub and a bridge between the cultures of Europe, Africa, and the Middle East, North Africa (the Maghreb) has long been overlooked in narratives of world history. From the establishment of French colonialism to the Arab Spring, the centralization of power and the power of revolt have played critical roles in defining the cultures, politics, and histories of the modern Maghreb. Using authority and resistance as organizing themes, this course explores the complex issues of multiculturalism, nationalism, and state-society relations in this dynamic region.
0900:TR   STERN 103
HIST 253-01 Autocracy, Uprisings, and Daily Life in Medieval and Imperial Russia
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RUSS 253-01. An examination of the early formation of multi-ethnic clans into a large multinational empire. The course explores state formation, the role of women, church power, the arts, nationality conflict and figures such as Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, and Catherine the Great.
1030:MWF   DENNY 203
HIST 257-01 European Intellectual History
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Main currents of Western thought from the 17th century to the present with emphasis upon the interaction of ideas and social development. Offered every other year.
1330:TR   DENNY 211
HIST 259-01 Islam
Instructor: Theodore Pulcini
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 259-01, RELG 259-01 and MEMS 200-10. An introduction to Islamic beliefs and practices in their classical forms: rituals, law, mysticism, and other topics. The course will consider aspects of Islamic cultures and societies in medieval and modern times. This course is cross-listed as MEST 259 and RELG 259.
1130:MWF   DENNY 104
HIST 272-01 The Atlantic Slave Trade and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 1450-1850
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02 and LALC 272-01. During several centuries of European colonization in the New World, a thriving slave trade forced the emigration of millions of Africans across the Atlantic-an immigration far larger than the simultaneous immigration of Europeans to the same regions. We will address not only the workings of the slave trade on both sides (and in the middle) of the Atlantic, but also the cultural communities of West and West-Central Africa and encounters and exchanges in the new slave societies of North and South America. Through examination of work processes, social orders, cultural strategies and influences, and ideas about race and geography, across time and in several regions, we will explore the crucial roles of Africans in the making of the Atlantic world. This course is cross-listed as LALC 272. Offered every two years.
1030:TR   DENNY 313
HIST 273-01 African Americans Since Slavery
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03. Focuses on the history of Americans of African ancestry in the years following the American Civil War, which ended in 1865. The course examines several important transformations of African Americans as a people. In the first, we consider the transition from slavery to a nominal but highly circumscribed "freedom," which ended with the destruction of Reconstruction governments in the South. We consider the institution-building and community-building processes among African Americans, and the development of distinctive elite and folk cultures among various classes of black people. We examine the Great Migration north and west between 1900 and 1920, and the urbanization of what had been a predominately rural people. Fifth, we consider the differential impact of World War I, the Great Depression, and the New Deal and World War II on African Americans, and the creation of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950's - 1980's. Offered every two years.
1330:MR   DENNY 313
HIST 333-01 The First World War
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
A study of the causes, progress, and consequences of the first global conflict of modern times. Particular attention is paid to the political and social impact of total warfare on the participating nations. Offered every other year.
1330:TF   DENNY 303
HIST 389-01 Native Peoples of Eastern North America
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ANTH 223-01. A survey of major development among Native Americans east of the Mississippi River from approximately A.D. 1500 to the present, using the interdisciplinary methodologies of ethnohistory. Topics to be addressed include 16th and 17th century demographic, economic, and social consequences of contact with European peoples, 18th century strategies of resistance and accommodation, 19th century government removal and cultural assimilation policies, and 20th century cultural and political developments among the regions surviving Indian communities. This course is cross-listed as ANTH 223.
1330:MR   DENNY 204
HIST 404-01 Medieval and Renaissance Heroes
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Although this course will cover a vast period of time (ca. 300-1300), it will focus on a rather narrow subjectthe hero. How did one become a hero? Was it instinctive or could one learn to be a hero? How did the characteristics of the heroic lifestyle change over time? Was there any real difference between male and female heroes? What role did heroes play in society? Was it a beneficial one? By reading literature, biographies, and other sources from the period, we shall attempt to answer these and other questions.
1500:MR   DENNY 204