Spring 2015

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 107-01 Modern Europe, 1789-2000
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
What does it mean to be "modern?" The course will examine the changing relationship between state and society, the growth of nationalism, the industrial revolution, liberalism, imperialism, socialism, secularization, urbanization, warfare, gender roles, the arts, and much more.
0930:MWF   DENNY 203
HIST 117-01 American History 1607 to 1877
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
This course covers colonial, revolutionary, and national America through Reconstruction. Include attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
1230:MWF   DENNY 313
HIST 118-02 American History 1877 to Present
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
This course covers aspects of political evolution, foreign policy development, industrialization, urbanization, and the expanding roles of 20th century central government. Includes attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
1030:TR   DENNY 110
HIST 120-01 East Asia: China and Japan
Instructor: Noriaki Hoshino
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-02.
1330:TR   DENNY 203
HIST 122-01 Middle East since 1750
Instructor: Gregory Aftandilian
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 122-01.
1330:MR   BOSLER 213
HIST 131-01 Modern Latin American History since 1800
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 231-01.
0900:TR   DENNY 110
HIST 204-01 Introduction to Historical Methodology
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.
1330:MR   DENNY 303
HIST 211-01 Civil Rights Movement
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03 and AMST 200-03. This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. In the class, we will analyze key people, issues, events and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power. Throughout the semester, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary texts to illuminate the activities and life stories of individual participants as well as the broad historical forces that characterized this long era of insurgency.
1500:MR   DENNY 203
HIST 211-02 Sex and the City: Gender, Politics, and Culture in 20th Century Urban America
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02. In this class, we will consider the ways in which gender and sexuality have been created, contested, defined, and performed in the urban environment. We will examine several United States cities to illuminate how gender has been inscribed on the urban environment and the ways in which the gendered city reflects complex intersections of race, class, and sexual orientation. The course might include a day trip to Philadelphia; Washington, DC; or New York City.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
HIST 215-01 Latin American History in Film
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-05 and LALC 200-01.Additional Time Slot: Optional Film Viewing Wednesday 4:30-7:00 pm in Bosler 208.This course explores the ways in which the Latin American past has been rendered on film by focusing on selected periods, events, and historical figures. Its two main objectives are to achieve a great understanding of the history of Latin America, and to analyze the relationship between history and historical representation. We will focus on topics such as colonization, slavery revolutions, race, gender, U.S. influence, etc. We will analyze mostly feature films along with some documentary work.
1500:TR   DENNY 112
HIST 215-02 Intellectual History of Race
Instructor: Noriaki Hoshino
Course Description:
This course examines the historical development of the idea of race and the function of racism in the modern period from a theoretical perspective. We will focus in particular on how theories of race and ethnicity have developed through intellectual debates. Beginning with the definition of race developed by Enlightenment thinkers, we will trace the further development of the concept in recent discussions of differential racism or "racism without race" (Balibar). The materials cover a broad range of areas and perspectives including Europe, the U.S., East Asia, and Africa.
0900:TR   DENNY 204
HIST 215-03 How the Great War Made America Modern
Instructor: K Wendy Moffat, Tami Biddle
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 301-01, ENGL 349-01 and POSC 290-01. This interdisciplinary course posits the entry of the United States into World War I as a pivotal moment in its becoming a modern society and a global political force. We will trace the emergence of the US government as a force in the lives of Americans; the emergence of the US as a great power, and as the owner of a sizable and increasingly powerful military establishment; and the effect of war trauma (particularly PTSD) in medicine and public policy. We will read widely (in policy, journalism, literature, government documents, personal accounts, war theory, history) to explore the following questions: What were the justifications for and debates about America entering a foreign war ? If you become a great power and create a large military full of people whom you then send off to war, how do you bring them home again? What do the burdens of this war experience look like and feel like to those who carry them? What do we do (or fail to do) as a nation to help people bear those burdens? How does the experience of America in World War I shape ideas about the role the US military should play in the world? How did America face (or avoid) reckoning with the cost (material and psychic) of the war?
1330:T   ALTHSE 201
HIST 254-01 Russia: Quest for the Modern
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
This course explores Russia's attempts to forge modernity since the late 19th century. Students will explore the rise of socialism and communism, centralization of nearly all aspects of life (arts, politics, economics, and even sexual relations), and opposition to the terror regime's attempts to remake life and the post-Soviet state's attempts to overcome Russia's past.
1130:MWF   DENNY 203
HIST 257-01 European Intellectual History
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Main currents of Western thought from the 17th century to the present with emphasis upon the interaction of ideas and social development. Offered every other year.
1500:MR   DENNY 315
HIST 279-01 The History of Film
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 201-01.Additional Time Slot: Optional Film Viewing Tuesday 3:00-6:00 pm in Denny 317.
1330:TR   DENNY 21
HIST 288-01 Civil War - Reconstruction
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
A study of the political, economic, social, and intellectual aspects of 19th century America from 1848 to 1877. Attention is given to the causes and course of the Civil War and evaluates the results of Reconstruction.
1330:TR   DENNY 317
HIST 311-02 Frederick Douglass to Barack Obama: African American Intellectual History
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-04. This writing intensive class will examine African American intellectuals and intellectual life from the mid-nineteenth century up until today. We will examine the lives and thought of a variety of African Americans, from political theorists, social scientists, philosophers and economists to social critics, novelists, artists, and activists. In the class, we will situate their ideas within broader historical contexts. By analyzing a wide range of texts, we will look at the issues that were most pressing to them: race and racism, the desire for self-expression, economic development, political representation, and social activism. Ultimately, the course aims to explore how African American intellectuals have contributed to our understanding of issues facing African Americans in the US and across the Diaspora.
1330:W   DENNY 204
HIST 313-01 Scientific Revolution?
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
In this writing intensive class, we will investigate the development of the powerful ways of knowing we call science. Focusing on the pivotal periods often called revolutions we will examine topics from the decline of natural magic and alchemy and the changing meaning of monsters, to the invention of concepts of objectivity and factuality, to the imperial expansion of natural history and the origins of evolutionary thought, to the development of big science and the rise of cold war physics. In doing so we will better understand our own ways of looking at the world.
1500:TF   DENNY 315
HIST 315-01 War and Memory in East Asia
Instructor: Noriaki Hoshino
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 306-02. This course explores historically controversial issues that originated during World War II in East Asia. In particular, we will examine debates on the Nanjing Massacre, Comfort Women, and the Atomic Bomb. All of these incidents or issues still cause emotional reactions inside and outside East Asia. Through analysis of a wide range of materials such as letters, official documents, scholarly articles, essays, novels, and films, the course reflects on historical method and the role of memory and cultural identity in these debates. Course Priorities: 1 History Major 2 EASN Major
1330:M   STERN 12
HIST 373-01 Ecological History of Africa
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-02.
1030:MWF   DENNY 311
HIST 404-01 Nationalism
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
What is nationalism? Is there something innate about the nation, or is it an idea constructed by politicians? What is the role of culture? And what about the rise of the subnational-the claims of local, regional, and ethnic minorities? This seminar will examine theory and case studies, including the French, Palestinian, and Zulu examples, to reach a conclusion.
1330:WF   DENNY 315
HIST 500-01 Civil War Legal
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
 
HIST 500-03 Gettysburg
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
 
HIST 500-04 Ancient and Medieval Culture: Gladitorial Games and Tournaments
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
 
HIST 550-01 Urban Planning and Green Cities in Soviet and Post-Soviet Space
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
 
HIST 550-02 The Role of Children in the 1918 Influenza in New Zealand
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
 
HIST 550-03 Capturing Veterans Memories in Oral Histories
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
 
HIST 550-04 Impact of Influenza on Rural Populations
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
 
HIST 550-05 Women Restoration Playwrights: 1660-1700
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description: