Spring 2016

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 106-01 Early Modern Europe to 1799
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Society, culture, and politics from the Renaissance through the French Revolution.
1130:MWF   DENNY 311
HIST 107-01 Modern Europe, 1789-2000
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
What does it mean to be "modern?" The course will examine the changing relationship between state and society, the growth of nationalism, the industrial revolution, liberalism, imperialism, socialism, secularization, urbanization, warfare, gender roles, the arts, and much more.
0930:MWF   DENNY 203
HIST 117-01 American History 1607 to 1877
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
This course covers colonial, revolutionary, and national America through Reconstruction. Include attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
0830:MWF   DENNY 311
HIST 118-01 American History 1877 to Present
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
This course covers aspects of political evolution, foreign policy development, industrialization, urbanization, and the expanding roles of 20th century central government. Includes attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
1030:TR   DENNY 211
HIST 118-02 American History 1877 to Present
Instructor: Gregory Kaliss
Course Description:
This course covers aspects of political evolution, foreign policy development, industrialization, urbanization, and the expanding roles of 20th century central government. Includes attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
1330:MW   DENNY 211
HIST 120-01 History of East Asia from Ancient Times to the Present
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
This course explores the diverse and interrelated histories of the region currently composed of China, Korea, and Japan, over the past two thousand years. We begin by studying the technologies and systems of thought that came to be shared across East Asia, including written languages, philosophies of rule, and religions. Next, we examine periods of major upheaval and change, such as the rise of warrior governments, the Mongol conquests, and engagement with the West. The course concludes by tracing the rise and fall of the Japanese empire and the development of the modern nation states that we see today.
0900:TR   DENNY 212
HIST 122-01 Middle East since 1750
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 122-01. Bureaucratic-military reforms of the 19th century in Egypt and the Ottoman Empire, European imperialism, regional nationalisms, contemporary autocratic regimes, and the politicization of religion. This course is cross-listed as MEST 122.
1130:MWF   DENNY 211
HIST 204-01 Introduction to Historical Methodology
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.
1330:MR   LIBRY ARCHCLS
HIST 204-02 Introduction to Historical Methodology
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.
1030:TR   LIBRY ICCR
HIST 211-01 Debating Civil Rights History Through Film
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01 and AMST 200-05. This course will examine the post-World War II Civil Rights Movement led by African Americans in the United States. By viewing and analyzing key documentaries and motion pictures that focus on this important time in history, we will analyze the ways in which screenwriters and directors depict the movement and the larger implications of this. In addition to viewing key documentaries and films, we will read a wide variety of primary and secondary sources that highlight the key people, issues, events, and debates within movement history, including, but not limited to, gender and leadership; struggles for civil rights in the south, west, and urban north; the impact of the Cold War on race relations; student activism; movement strategies; and the emergence of Black Power.
1330:W   DENNY 313
HIST 211-02 Sports, Race and the American Dream
Instructor: Gregory Kaliss
Course Description:
Students who have taken this topic as AMST 200 in Fall 2014, may not take/receive credit for this class.Many have looked to the world of sports as a realization of the "American Dream" of a color-blind meritocracy in which participants succeed or fail on their own merits alone. And yet issues of racial identity have been central to the story of sports in America, echoing and informing social debates regarding equality, racial and gender stereotypes, legalized segregation, and the quest for civil rights. We will explore these issues and others by examining the history of a wide range of subjects from the late nineteenth century through to the present, including: the life and times of Jack Johnson; Jim Thorpe and the experiences of Native American athletes; the Black Athlete Revolt of 1968; Michael Jordan and corporate America's influence on black athletes; and much more. Course materials will include historical accounts, sports journalism, theoretical analysis, documentary and feature films, and Internet message boards.
1500:MR   DENNY 21
HIST 211-03 American Landscapes
Instructor: Gregory Kaliss
Course Description:
This course will explore how Americans have historically conceived of, represented, created, and contested a wide range of American landscapes. From the Hudson River Valley to the Yosemite Valley, from Central Park to the World's Columbian Exposition, and many more noteworthy sites in between, this course will explore the history of artistic representations of landscapes, preservation campaigns, and landscape architecture and park design. By exploring the battles fought between groups over the use and "misuse" of public landscapes, students will also gain insights into the class, race and gender divides that affected individuals' relationships to the land.
0900:TR   DENNY 203
HIST 213-01 The Crusades
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-01. While warfare has always played an important role in Western life, beginning in the latter part of the eleventh century, there emerged new ideas about the purpose of war, against whom it should properly be conducted, and its importance for those who engaged in it. Referred to as the crusades, these wars were presented as a moral and righteous struggle against the enemies of God. Indeed, as a holy undertaking, the crusades were not merely justified, but justifying and spiritually beneficial for those who participated in them. By reading primary sources from the four groups involved in the crusades Western Christians, Jews, Byzantine Greeks, and Moslems we shall address a number of questions about this phenomenon. What, if anything did the crusades achieve? Was the Church and Christianity improved or harmed by its involvement in the crusades? Does extreme idealism inevitably lead to extreme intolerance and fanaticism?
1500:TR   DENNY 311
HIST 215-01 Mediterranean Migrations
Instructor: Marcelo Borges, Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 230-02.Permission of Instructor RequiredPart of the Mediterranean Migrations Mosaic. 1 credit course cross-listed in History and Sociology will focus on the development of migratory flows between Morocco and southern Europe in the context of trans-Mediterranean migration history. In addition, the course will place migration from Morocco within the larger historical contacts between Europe and Moroccoincluding colonialism and its aftermathand it will consider the impact of larger socioeconomic and political changes on geographic mobility across the Mediterranean. The course will address the interplay of structural socioeconomic and political factors with individual trajectories of migrant men and women, and the impact they have on families and communities.
0900:TR   CMST SEM
HIST 215-02 Research Methods - Mediterranean Mosaic
Instructor: Marcelo Borges, Susan Rose
Course Description:
Cross-listed with SOCI 240-02.Permission of Instructor RequiredPart of the Mediterranean Migrations Mosaic.
1030:TR   CMST SEM
HIST 215-03 Medicine and The Body in East Asia
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-04. This course is an introduction to the history of medicine in East Asia. We will begin by exploring the theoretical and practical underpinnings of classical Chinese medicine, which was the foundation of healing practices in premodern China, Korea, and Japan. We will then move on to trace the introduction of modern bio-medicine and the eventual reemergence of "Traditional Chinese Medicine" as an alternative style of therapy in the 20th century. We will also consider a wide range of topics that have generated compelling intellectual dialogue, including the relationship between doctors and patients and between medicine and the state.
1500:TF   DENNY 212
HIST 215-04 Screening Korea: Film and Historical Understanding
Instructor: Jina Kim
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 204-01 and FLST 210-03. Do national cinemas evolve with a countrys major transformations? How do historians analyze films and how do filmmakers represent history? In this course, we will investigate South Korean and North Korean films with the aim of gaining a rich and textured understanding of these nations past and present. Using films as our primary sources, we will learn about the politics, economy, and social relations of key time periods in the past. Through films, we will also chart changes in society and examine salient aspects of collective memories about the colonial era (1910-1945), national division (1945-present), and postcolonial economic development (1961-1987). In addition to the films, we will read scholarly texts about North and South Korean histories and societies.
1030:MWF   EASTC 301
HIST 248-01 The American Revolution
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
This course will focus on the period between 1763 and the first decade of the 1800s in North America, a time of tumultuous upheaval, intellectual ferment, and sporadic but intense violence which culminated in the creation of the United States. It will cover topics such as the expulsion of the French from North America, the rise of the a bourgeois public sphere, colonial contestation over sovereignty with Great Britain, the role of the military and violence in the new nation, republicanism, and the immediate ramifications of independence on a wide variety of groups within North America, such as women, American Indians, and free and slave African Americans.
1330:MR   DENNY 104
HIST 254-01 Russia: Quest for the Modern
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
This course explores Russia's attempts to forge modernity since the late 19th century. Students will explore the rise of socialism and communism, centralization of nearly all aspects of life (arts, politics, economics, and even sexual relations), and opposition to the terror regime's attempts to remake life and the post-Soviet state's attempts to overcome Russia's past.
1130:MWF   DENNY 212
HIST 259-01 Islam
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 259-01 and RELG 259-01. An introduction to Islamic beliefs and practices in their classical forms: rituals, law, mysticism, and other topics. The course will consider aspects of Islamic cultures and societies in medieval and modern times. This course is cross-listed as MEST 259 and RELG 259.
1330:TF   DENNY 203
HIST 271-01 African History since 1800
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03. In this course we will study the political, social, economic and ecological forces that have shaped African societies since 1800. We will examine in depth the Asante kingdom in West Africa, the Kongo kingdom in Central Africa, and the Zulu kingdom in Southern Africa. European's colonization of Africa and Africans' responses will be a major focus of the course.
1230:MWF   DENNY 303
HIST 272-01 The Atlantic Slave Trade and Africans in the Making of the Atlantic World, 1450-1850
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04 and LALC 272-01. During several centuries of European colonization in the New World, a thriving slave trade forced the emigration of millions of Africans across the Atlantic-an immigration far larger than the simultaneous immigration of Europeans to the same regions. We will address not only the workings of the slave trade on both sides (and in the middle) of the Atlantic, but also the cultural communities of West and West-Central Africa and encounters and exchanges in the new slave societies of North and South America. Through examination of work processes, social orders, cultural strategies and influences, and ideas about race and geography, across time and in several regions, we will explore the crucial roles of Africans in the making of the Atlantic world. This course is cross-listed as LALC 272. Offered every two years.
1030:MWF   DENNY 303
HIST 279-01 The History of Film
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 201-01. This course concerns the emergence and development of the film industry and the various conditions that have and continue to influence it. While artistic considerations are certainly important, the making of films is also a commercial enterprise in which financial concerns are paramount. Moreover, since films enjoy enormous popularity with virtually all in society, regardless of age or education, the political and moral content of films is a constant concern for private as well as governmental organizations. Therefore, this course is also about how competing and often incompatible tensions -- artistic, financial, political, and moral -- have influenced the making of films. This course is cross-listed as FLST 201.
1330:TR   DENNY 311
HIST 282-02 Diplomatic History of the United States
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
Description and analysis of the nation's role in world affairs, from the earliest definitions of a national interest in the 18th century, through continental expansion, acquisition of empire, and world power, to the Cold War. This course is cross-listed as INST 282.
 
HIST 288-01 Civil War - Reconstruction
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
A study of the political, economic, social, and intellectual aspects of 19th century America from 1848 to 1877. Attention is given to the causes and course of the Civil War and evaluates the results of Reconstruction.
1330:TR   DENNY 211
HIST 311-01 Digital History
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
This advanced history methods class offers students a chance to study principles and best practices of those engaged in digitizing history and presenting history online in various multi-media formats. Students in this course will also build their own digital history projects for presentation online. No previous technical skills are required, but students should be prepared to experiment with a variety of new digital tools.
1500:TR   DENNY 211
HIST 311-02 History of Motherhood in the U.S.
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-02 and WGST 300-03. This course examines the history of motherhood in the United States, paying special attention to how the institution of motherhood, and experiences of mothering, have been constructed over time. Throughout the semester, we will examine the changing and multiple meanings of motherhood, how these meanings have been constructed and disseminated through the media, and the impact of these on womens lives. Additionally, we will examine the ways in which the platform of motherhood has been used to agitate for political power, both historically and in contemporary moments. Throughout the semester, we will pay special attention to the ways in which race, class, and alternative ideas about the family have shaped our understanding of the meaning of motherhood. This course will function as a seminar and, as a result, students should be prepared to focus on close readings of texts, careful and original analysis of key ideas, class participation, and written analysis.
1330:TR   TOME 117
HIST 315-01 Women and Society in Modern Japanese History
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 306-01 and WGST 300-02. This course is an exploration of women's lives and livelihoods in modern Japanese history. We will analyze the changes Japanese society underwent from the 19th century to the present, paying particular attention to transformations as well as continuities in family structure and gender roles. A key theme of the course is the socially-constructed nature of gender norms and feminine ideals and how women frequently transgressed such norms, a theme that we will explore through both primary sources in translation and secondary scholarship. Building upon in-class workshops and a series of short-essay assignments, the final goal of the course will be to produce an original research paper.
1330:W   STERN 12
HIST 378-01 Society and the Sexes
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 378-01. This is a reading seminar that investigates three separate but interrelated threads - the history of sexuality, the history of the body and the construction of gender - in both pre-industrial and modern Europe. The course explores how definitions of male/female and feminine/masculine have changed over time and how they shaped the life experiences of men and women. Readings will include medical opinions, legal texts, diaries, novels, and political debates. This course is cross-listed as WGST 378. Offered every two or three years.
1030:TR   DENNY 303
HIST 404-01 War & Memory in the 20th C
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
This senior seminar will ask how the European and American wars of the 20th century have been remembered and commemorated. Our readings will look at time and place (such as anniversaries and battle-field monuments), and at oral and written testimony. The first part of the course will involve intensive reading. After that, students will develop research projects which explore our core questions.
1330:MW   DENNY 204
HIST 500-02 Allies of Convience
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
 
HIST 550-01 Health and Medical Care at the Carlisle Indian Industrial School
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
 
HIST 550-02 Life History and Autobiography: A Mexican Woman Example
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description: