Fall 2014

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 105-01 Medieval Europe
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
This survey course will study the development of European civilization during the period ca.300 to 1300. It will consider the impact of such events as the decline of the Roman Empire, the Germanic invasions, the development of Christianity and the Church, the emergence of feudalism, the expansion of Islam and the Crusades, and the creation of romantic literature.
0900:TR   DENNY 203
HIST 117-01 American History 1607 to 1877
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
This course covers colonial, revolutionary, and national America through Reconstruction. Include attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
0830:MWF   DENNY 311
HIST 117-02 American History 1607 to 1877
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
This course covers colonial, revolutionary, and national America through Reconstruction. Include attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
1030:TR   DENNY 212
HIST 118-01 American History 1877 to Present
Instructor: Crystal Moten
Course Description:
This course covers aspects of political evolution, foreign policy development, industrialization, urbanization, and the expanding roles of 20th century central government. Includes attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
0930:MWF   DENNY 203
HIST 121-01 Middle East to 1750
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 121-01.
1030:MWF   DENNY 203
HIST 130-01 Early Latin American History to 1800
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 230-01.
0900:TR   DENNY 110
HIST 151-01 History of Environment
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 151-01.
1030:MWF   DENNY 313
HIST 204-01 Introduction to Historical Methodology
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.
1030:TR   DENNY 15
HIST 204-02 Introduction to Historical Methodology
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.
1500:WF   DENNY 315
HIST 211-01 Food and American Environment
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
Cross-listed with ENST 311-03. This class examines the ways that the culture and politics of food have reshaped North American landscapes and social relations from colonial to modern times. We will explore, for example, how the new taste for sweetness fueled the creation of plantations worked by enslaved, the ways that the distribution of frozen meat helped build cities and clear rangeland, and the ways that the eating of fresh fruit came to depend on both a new population of migrant laborers and a new regime of toxic chemicals. Other topics will include catastrophes such as the Dustbowl, the controversial transformations of the Green Revolution, and the modern debates about the obesity epidemic.
1500:TF   DENNY 313
HIST 211-02 Looking Across the Pacific: Japanese and American Environmental History
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-02 and ENST 311-01. Cultural comparison can be a powerful tool to get us to question our assumptions and to make the familiar seem unfamiliar. With this in mind, this class juxtaposes the environmental histories of the United States and Japan, highlighting radical differences, unexpected similarities, and transpacific connections. Separate units will question each cultures definitions of nature, examine different relationships with indigenous cultures, compare energy strategies, with a particular focus on the Three Mile Island and Fukushima disasters, and finally examine how these cultures have influenced each other through the exchange of organisms and ideas.
1030:TR   DENNY 204
HIST 213-01 WWI Revisited: Methods and Meanings of Commemoration
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
This course will begin by making sure everyone understands the basics of the conflict that started exactly 100 years ago and became the Great War. Then we will explore how the war is being commemorated, or not, in different countries and how various interpretations of the war developed over time. Students final projects can be either an essay analyzing methods of commemoration or a research project on the war itself using primary sources. This will allow students who are interested to prepare work that could be presented at the CPC (Central Pennsylvania Consortiums) WWI conference that will be held in March 2015 at Franklin & Marshall College. (Applications to deliver a paper will be due in December.)
0930:MWF   DENNY 304
HIST 215-01 Imperial China
Instructor: Noriaki Hoshino
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01. In this class, you will learn about change and continuity in imperial China, from the third century BC through 1911. Over the course of this more than two thousand years, what we refer to as China changed a great deal politically, economically, socially, and even ecologically. We will explore many of these changes, while at the same timekeeping an eye on the continuities that continued to characterize this amazing place and people over the long term. Among the topics you can expect to learn about in this course are:Who and what constituted China in different periodsHow the geography and climate of China differ from place to placeHow the imperial government was organized and how the ruling family established their legitimacyHow different forms of religionincluding Daoism, Buddhism, the state cult and popular practices such as ancestor worshipdeveloped and related to one anotherHow the Chinese empire interacted with the nomadic peoples and states on its bordersHow the role and treatment of women in Chinese society changed, and what has remained the same
0830:MWF   DENNY 104
HIST 215-02 Modern Japan in the Transpacific World
Instructor: Noriaki Hoshino
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-03.Drawing on recent developments in postcolonial and transnational studies, this course explores various approaches to modern Japanese history from a transpacific perspective, in particular Japans relationship with the United States and other East Asian countries. Using a rich variety of materials such as novels, films, and essays, this course will examine the intellectual, cultural, and socioeconomic history of Japan from the late-nineteenth century to the present. Topics include Japanese migration to the United States, Japanese colonization of East Asia, African- American interest in racial issues within Asia, Japanese and Chinese intellectual discussions of modernity, American militarization in East Asia, and the circulation of Japanese subcultures abroad.
1330:MW   DENNY 203
HIST 223-01 Renaissance Europe
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
A study of prevailing conditions (social, economic, political, and cultural) in western Europe with particular attention given to the achievements and failures of the Renaissance. Offered every other year.
1330:TR   DENNY 203
HIST 231-01 Modern France
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
French society, culture, and politics from the French Revolution to the present. Themes include revolutionary tradition, the development of modern life in Paris, the French empire, and the impact of World War I and II. Offered every other year.
1230:MWF   DENNY 110
HIST 247-01 Early American History
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
An examination of North American history from the earliest contacts between European and American peoples to the eve of the American Revolution. Particular attention is devoted to the interplay of Indian, French, Spanish, and English cultures, to the rise of the British to a position of dominance by 1763, and to the internal social and political development of the Anglo-American colonies.
0900:TR   DENNY 21
HIST 253-01 Russia: Clans to Empire
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
An examination of the early formation of multi-ethnic clans into a large multinational empire. The course explores state formation, the role of women, church power, the arts, nationality conflict and figures such as Ivan the Terrible, Peter the Great, and Catherine the Great.
1130:MWF   DENNY 313
HIST 259-01 Islam
Instructor: Theodore Pulcini
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 259-01 and RELG 259-01.
1030:TR   DENNY 103
HIST 271-01 African History since 1800
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-01.
0930:MWF   DENNY 21
HIST 278-01 European Women's History
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with WGST 278-01.
1330:MR   DENNY 303
HIST 282-01 Diplomatic History of the United States
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 282-01.
1330:TR   DENNY 110
HIST 315-01 Immigration, Race and the Nation in Latin America
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 300-01. Characterized by a racially and ethnically diverse population, race has been contested terrain in the countries of Latin America. After independence, some countries embraced the mixed heritage of their populations as a distinctive feature of their national identities while others tried to change it by implementing active policies of immigration, especially from Europe. By looking at different national cases in comparison, this course explores how notions of race, ethnicity, and nationhood have varied in Latin America over time. The course will focus on both the views of key intellectuals and policy-makers as well as on the experiences and actions of peoples of diverse origins. It will discuss topics such as the legacy of slavery, racial democracy, indigenous policies, nationalism and nativism, and the comparative experiences of European and Asian immigrants in the region. Class discussion will give special attention to the different ways in which scholars have approached these topics over time.
1500:MR   WESTC 1
HIST 315-02 Modern Iran
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-01. This course examines Iran's history from 1500 to the present, with an emphasis on political and religious developments under the Safavid, Qajar and Pahlavi dynasties, and the Islamic Republic.
1230:MWF   DENNY 104
HIST 375-01 Europe's Dictators
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
Contrary to the hope of contemporaries, World War I was not "the war to end all wars." Instead, at its end Europe emerged into a world of unprecedented turmoil and confusion, a time that was nonetheless permeated with hope, idealism, and possibility. This course explores European politics, society, gender, and culture between 1918 and 1945, focusing on the extreme developments in Germany, Russia, Spain, and Italy during this time. We will examine the emergence, development, form, and consequences of the rule of Hitler, Stalin, Franco and Mussolini and explore the relationship of these dictators to the states that sustained them. Offered occasionally.
1500:TF   DENNY 203
HIST 404-01 Medieval and Renaissance Heroes
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
An examination of the historiography of a major topic, culminating in substantial research paper based in significant part on the interpretation of primary courses.
1500:MR   DENNY 315
HIST 500-01 Italians in Revolutionary America
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
 
HIST 550-01 Senior Research in American History
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description: