Fall 2016

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 107-01 Modern Europe, 1789-2000
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
What does it mean to be "modern?" The course will examine the changing relationship between state and society, the growth of nationalism, the industrial revolution, liberalism, imperialism, socialism, secularization, urbanization, warfare, gender roles, the arts, and much more.
1130:MWF   DENNY 212
HIST 117-01 American History 1607 to 1877
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
This course covers colonial, revolutionary, and national America through Reconstruction. Include attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
1330:TR   DENNY 211
HIST 117-02 American History 1607 to 1877
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
This course covers colonial, revolutionary, and national America through Reconstruction. Include attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
0830:MWF   DENNY 304
HIST 118-01 American History 1877 to Present
Instructor: Gregory Kaliss
Course Description:
This course covers aspects of political evolution, foreign policy development, industrialization, urbanization, and the expanding roles of 20th century central government. Includes attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
HIST 121-01 Middle East to 1750
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 121-01. The rise of Islam, the development of Islamic civilization in medieval times and its decline relative to Europe in the early modern era, 1500-1750. This course is cross-listed as MEST 121.
1230:MWF   DENNY 211
HIST 204-01 Introduction to Historical Methodology
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.
1500:TR   DENNY 211
HIST 211-01 US Elections
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
This upper-level survey course will examine how American campaigns and elections have evolved since the colonial era. Students will learn about revolutionary changes in voting eligibility, major shifts in campaigning practices, including fundraising and advertising, and will study certain pivotal elections and their consequences for American democracy. Course assignments will include exams, multi-media blog posts and traditional research papers.
1030:TR   DENNY 211
HIST 211-03 History of American Feminism
Instructor: Amy Farrell
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AMST 200-01 and WGSS 220-01. This course will emphasize such topics as the 19th century women's movement, the suffrage movement, radical and liberal feminism, and African-American feminism. We will pay particular attention to the diversity of women's experiences in the United States and to women's multiple and often conflicting responses to patriarchy and other forms of oppression.
1330:MR   DENNY 212
HIST 211-04 Sports, Race and the American Dream
Instructor: Gregory Kaliss
Course Description:
Many have looked to the world of sports as a realization of the American Dream of a color-blind meritocracy in which participants succeed or fail on their own merits alone. And yet issues of racial identity have been central to the story of sports in America, echoing and informing social debates regarding equality, racial and gender stereotypes, legalized segregation, and the quest for civil rights. We will explore these issues and others by examining the history of a wide range of subjects from the late nineteenth century through to the present, including: the life and times of Jack Johnson; Jim Thorpe and the experiences of Native American athletes; the Black Athlete Revolt of 1968; Michael Jordan and corporate Americas influence on black athletes; and much more. Course materials will include historical accounts, sports journalism, theoretical analysis, documentary and feature films, and Internet message boards.
0900:TR   DENNY 110
HIST 215-01 History of Modern Japan 1800 to the Present
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01. This course explores two centuries of successive transformations that have restructured Japanese society. Key topics include Japans transition from a feudal to a capitalist regime, the expansion of the Japanese empire, the Second World War, the post-war economic miracle, and recent political and economic anxieties as well as hope for the future. We will examine a range of engrossing primary sources and thought-provoking secondary scholarship to understand how geopolitical strategies and economic booms and busts have affected the daily lives of people in Japan, East Asia, and the rest of the modern world.
1500:MR   DENNY 303
HIST 215-02 Latin American History in Film
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 210-01 and LALC 200-01.Additional Time Slot: Tuesdays 3:00-6:00pm in Bosler 208 for optional film screenings. This course explores the ways in which the Latin American past has been rendered on film by focusing on selected periods, events, and historical figures. Its two main objectives are to achieve a great understanding of the history of Latin America, and to analyze the relationship between history and historical representation. We will focus on topics such as colonization, slavery revolutions, race, gender, U.S. influence, etc. We will analyze mostly feature films along with some documentary work.
0900:TR   DENNY 112
HIST 215-03 Medicine and The Body in East Asia
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-04.This course is an introduction to the history of medicine in East Asia. We will begin by exploring the theoretical and practical underpinnings of classical Chinese medicine, which was the foundation of healing practices in premodern China, Korea, and Japan. We will then move on to trace the introduction of modern bio-medicine and the eventual reemergence of "Traditional Chinese Medicine" as an alternative style of therapy in the 20th century. We will also consider a wide range of topics that have generated compelling intellectual dialogue, including the relationship between doctors and patients and between medicine and the state.
1330:TF   ALTHSE 201
HIST 215-04 African Slavery in a Global Context
Instructor: Amanda Lewis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-06.This course will examine the history of slavery on the African continent as well as the global impact of the slave trade. The first part of the course will consider the nature and scope of slavery in Africa and explore how slavery has been defined and continues to be defined. Then the course will focus on the diaspora of African slavery, most notably the Atlantic slave trade, but we will also explore the history of enslaved Africans taken to Europe, the Middle East, and Asia. This course will cover how slave trade systems worked, internal social dynamics of slavery, African influences in the diaspora, environmental change, and the impact of abolition.
1500:TR   STERN 103
HIST 231-01 Modern France
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
French society, culture, and politics from the French Revolution to the present. Themes include revolutionary tradition, the development of modern life in Paris, the French empire, and the impact of World War I and II. Offered every other year.
1030:MWF   DENNY 311
HIST 254-01 Revolution, War, and Daily Life in Modern Russia
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RUSS 254-01. This course explores Russia's attempts to forge modernity since the late 19th century. Students will explore the rise of socialism and communism, centralization of nearly all aspects of life (arts, politics, economics, and even sexual relations), and opposition to the terror regime's attempts to remake life and the post-Soviet state's attempts to overcome Russia's past.
0930:MWF   DENNY 203
HIST 259-01 Islam
Instructor: Theodore Pulcini
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 259-01 and RELG 259-01. An introduction to Islamic beliefs and practices in their classical forms: rituals, law, mysticism, and other topics. The course will consider aspects of Islamic cultures and societies in medieval and modern times. This course is cross-listed as MEST 259 and RELG 259.
1130:MWF   DENNY 104
HIST 270-01 African History from Earliest Times to C. 1850
Instructor: Amanda Lewis
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-02. This course provides an overview to the political, social, and ecological history of Africa. We will examine the peopling of the continent, the origins of agriculture, the growth of towns and the development of metal technology. Written sources before the 1400s are almost nonexistent for most of Africa, and so we will use archaeological and linguistic sources. The geographic focus of the course will be the Middle Nile, Aksum in Ethiopia, the Sudanic states in West Africa, Kongo in Central Africa, the Swahili states of the East African coast, and Zimbabwe and KwaZulu in Southern Africa. We will also examine the Atlantic Slave Trade and the colonization of the Cape of Good Hope.
0900:TR   DENNY 203
HIST 273-01 African Americans Since Slavery
Instructor: Casey Nichols
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03. Focuses on the history of Americans of African ancestry in the years following the American Civil War, which ended in 1865. The course examines several important transformations of African Americans as a people. In the first, we consider the transition from slavery to a nominal but highly circumscribed "freedom," which ended with the destruction of Reconstruction governments in the South. We consider the institution-building and community-building processes among African Americans, and the development of distinctive elite and folk cultures among various classes of black people. We examine the Great Migration north and west between 1900 and 1920, and the urbanization of what had been a predominately rural people. Fifth, we consider the differential impact of World War I, the Great Depression, and the New Deal and World War II on African Americans, and the creation of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950's - 1980's. Offered every two years.
1330:TR   WESTC DURBIN
HIST 286-01 New Nation
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
Reading and research in the political, economic, and social developments of the U.S. during the first generations of official nationhood, from the writing and ratification of the Constitution to the end of the Mexican War.
1330:MR   DENNY 304
HIST 311-02 Violence and Colonialism
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
This course will place in a comparative perspective the key role of violence in European colonization in the New World. Two geographical locations will be analyzed (North America and South America) and three imperial powers (English, French, and Spanish) between the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries. The goal is not a comprehensive look at the roles of violence in colonialism, but an episodic analysis of the ways in which violence manifests itself in colonial situations across time and space. Topics will include (among others) theories of violence, the origins of colonial violence, the roles of violence in colonizing versus colonized societies, the power and persistence of symbolic violence, and covert and overt resistance to colonial domination.
1330:W   DENNY 303
HIST 333-01 The First World War
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
A study of the causes, progress, and consequences of the first global conflict of modern times. Particular attention is paid to the political and social impact of total warfare on the participating nations. Offered every other year.
1030:TR   DENNY 303
HIST 375-01 Europe's Dictators
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
Contrary to the hope of contemporaries, World War I was not "the war to end all wars." Instead, at its end Europe emerged into a world of unprecedented turmoil and confusion, a time that was nonetheless permeated with hope, idealism, and possibility. This course explores European politics, society, gender, and culture between 1918 and 1945, focusing on the extreme developments in Germany, Russia, Spain, and Italy during this time. We will examine the emergence, development, form, and consequences of the rule of Hitler, Stalin, Franco and Mussolini and explore the relationship of these dictators to the states that sustained them. Offered occasionally.
1330:TF   DENNY 204
HIST 404-01 US-Middle East Relations
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 490-01. This seminar will examine episodes in US-Middle East relations from the Barbary Wars to the war in Iraq in a framework of historical hostility between Christendom and Islamdom. In addition to the diplomatic aspect, topics will include American missionary activity, petroleum, and immigration from the Middle East to the United States.
1330:M   DENNY 204
HIST 550-01 Second Wave Feminism and Reproductive Choice
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description: