Spring 2018

Course Code Title/Instructor Meets
HIST 107-01 Modern Europe, 1789-2000
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
We know that we live in a modern society, but what does it mean to be modern? The course will examine the changing relationship between state and society, the growth of nationalism, the industrial revolution, liberalism, imperialism, socialism, fascism, secularization, urbanization, warfare, gender roles, the arts, and more. These topics allow us to understand many present-day problems in Europeand much of the rest of the world--including ethnic and national tensions, economic and gender inequality, refugee crises, global economic and political competition, minority rights, environmental degradation and many other topics.
0900:TR   DENNY 203
HIST 117-01 American History 1607 to 1877
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
This course covers colonial, revolutionary, and national America through Reconstruction. Include attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
0930:MWF   DENNY 304
HIST 117-02 American History 1607 to 1877
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
This course covers colonial, revolutionary, and national America through Reconstruction. Include attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
1130:MWF   DENNY 313
HIST 118-01 American History 1877 to Present
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
This course covers aspects of political evolution, foreign policy development, industrialization, urbanization, and the expanding roles of 20th century central government. Includes attention to historical interpretation. Multiple sections offered.
1030:TR   DENNY 211
HIST 120-01 History of East Asia from Ancient Times to the Present
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
This class can be taken instead of EASN 101 for the EASN major. This course explores the diverse and interrelated histories of the region currently composed of China, Korea, and Japan, over the past two thousand years. We begin by studying the technologies and systems of thought that came to be shared across East Asia, including written languages, philosophies of rule, and religions. Next, we examine periods of major upheaval and change, such as the rise of warrior governments, the Mongol conquests, and engagement with the West. The course concludes by tracing the rise and fall of the Japanese empire and the development of the modern nation states that we see today.
1330:MR   DENNY 311
HIST 122-01 Middle East since 1750
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 122-01. Bureaucratic-military reforms of the 19th century in Egypt and the Ottoman Empire, European imperialism, regional nationalisms, contemporary autocratic regimes, and the politicization of religion. This course is cross-listed as MEST 122.
1130:MWF   DENNY 203
HIST 204-01 Introduction to Historical Methodology
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Local archives and libraries serve as laboratories for this project-oriented seminar that introduces beginning majors to the nature of history as a discipline, historical research techniques, varied forms of historical evidence and the ways in which historians interpret them, and the conventions of historical writing. Prerequisite: one previous course in history.
1330:MR   LIBRY ARCHCLS
HIST 211-01 US Military History
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
This historical topics course will survey major themes in US military history, including an assessment of the evolving American way of war, major homefront challenges, and key episodes in civil-military relations within the constitutional framework.
0900:TR   DENNY 211
HIST 211-02 Double Jeopardy: African American Women and Protest Politics
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-03 and WGSS 202-02. This class explores African American womens relationships to various social movements throughout the twentieth century. African American women were key leaders and pioneers of a number of significant social movements in the US including the clubwomens movement, the Harlem Renaissance, and the civil rights movement. Yet they often found themselves excluded from white-dominated protest groups, for instance within the suffrage movement. This class will explore the ways in which African American women maneuvered around and in spite of these exclusions and created some of the most powerful critiques, organizations, texts and protest tactics of the twentieth century. Key movements that we will explore include the clubwomens movement, the Harlem Renaissance, civil rights and Black Power, welfare rights and womens liberation.
1330:TF   DENNY 313
HIST 211-03 The Civil Rights Movement: North and South
Instructor: Sarah Burgin
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 220-04. The post-World War II movement for African Americans civil rights is often consider solely in terms of Southern-based groups and events. This class will explode the myth that the civil rights movement was confined to the South by exploring the national character of inequalities, segregation and the movement for black freedom. With special attention to the years 1945-1975, this class will consider how segregation formed differently in Birmingham versus Alabama, how the fight for school de-segregation included battles in both Little Rock and New York, and how gender shaped protest politics and tactics of the movement across the nation. Key topics will include Martin Luther King, Jr., Malcolm X and ideas of leadership; key campaigns in Birmingham, New York, Detroit and elsewhere; important groups like the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; and how ideas about masculinity and femininity shaped the movement.
1030:MWF   DENNY 304
HIST 211-04 Food and American Environment
Instructor: Emily Pawley
Course Description:
This class examines the ways that the culture and politics of food have reshaped North American landscapes and social relations from colonial to modern times. We will explore, for example, how the new taste for sweetness fueled the creation of plantations worked by enslaved, the ways that the distribution of frozen meat helped build cities and clear rangeland, and the ways that the eating of fresh fruit came to depend on both a new population of migrant laborers and a new regime of toxic chemicals. Other topics will include catastrophes such as the Dustbowl, the controversial transformations of the Green Revolution, and the modern debates about the obesity epidemic.
1500:TF   DENNY 212
HIST 213-01 The Crusades
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 200-01 and MEMS 200-03. While warfare has always played an important role in Western life, beginning in the latter part of the eleventh century, there emerged new ideas about the purpose of war, against whom it should properly be conducted, and its importance for those who engaged in it. Referred to as the crusades, these wars were presented as a moral and righteous struggle against the enemies of God. Indeed, as a holy undertaking, the crusades were not merely justified, but justifying and spiritually beneficial for those who participated in them. By reading primary sources from the four groups involved in the crusades Western Christians, Jews, Byzantine Greeks, and Moslems we shall address a number of questions about this phenomenon. What, if anything did the crusades achieve? Was the Church and Christianity improved or harmed by its involvement in the crusades? Does extreme idealism inevitably lead to extreme intolerance and fanaticism?
1030:TR   DENNY 21
HIST 213-02 Popular Culture in Early Modern Europe
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEMS 200-04.This course will explore the everyday culture of early modern Europe including careful consideration of how people made sense of their world. It will range from examining religious rituals and objects such as relics to natural magic and the popular science that came with the Scientific Revolution. We will also examine the relationship between commoners and the elites while looking at how ideas spread whether by oral culture, images or the new technology of printing.
1330:MR   DENNY 303
HIST 215-01 Medicine and The Body in East Asia
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 206-01. This course is an introduction to the history of medicine in East Asia. We will begin by exploring the theoretical and practical underpinnings of classical Chinese medicine, which was the foundation of healing practices in premodern China, Korea, and Japan. We will then move on to trace the introduction of modern bio-medicine and the eventual reemergence of "Traditional Chinese Medicine" as an alternative style of therapy in the 20th century. We will also consider a wide range of topics that have generated compelling intellectual dialogue, including the relationship between doctors and patients and between medicine and the state
1500:MR   DENNY 212
HIST 215-02 Screening Korea: Film and Historical Understanding
Instructor: Jina Kim
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 204-01 and FLST 210-03. Do national cinemas evolve with a countrys major transformations? How do historians analyze films and how do filmmakers represent history? In this course, we will investigate South Korean and North Korean films with the aim of gaining a rich and textured understanding of these nations past and present. Using films as our primary sources, we will learn about the politics, economy, and social relations of key time periods in the past. Through films, we will also chart changes in society and examine salient aspects of collective memories about the colonial era (1910-1945), national division (1945-present), and postcolonial economic development (1961-1987). In addition to the films, we will read scholarly texts about North and South Korean histories and societies.
1500:TF   STERN 103
HIST 215-03 World Migrations Since 1850
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description:
Cross-listed with LALC 200-08. This course will examine human mobility since the middle of the nineteenth century by comparing different historical moments, societies, and experiences. The basic questions it seeks to address are: Why have people moved in different historical moments and across different spaces? How have they been received by other societies? What regimes of state control have emerged over time and why? Why have some migrants been welcomed as new citizens while others have been rejected as a menace to receiving societies values and culture? How have migrants accommodated to or challenged the reality of migration and transnational lives? It will include a wide variety of migrant experiences, such as labor migrations, migrations in imperial and post-colonial spaces, family migration, and displaced peoples and refugees.
1330:TF   DENNY 315
HIST 254-01 Revolution, War, and Daily Life in Modern Russia
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
Cross-listed with RUSS 254-01. This course explores Russia's attempts to forge modernity since the late 19th century. Students will explore the rise of socialism and communism, centralization of nearly all aspects of life (arts, politics, economics, and even sexual relations), and opposition to the terror regime's attempts to remake life and the post-Soviet state's attempts to overcome Russia's past.
1030:TR   DENNY 203
HIST 279-01 The History of Film
Instructor: Stephen Weinberger
Course Description:
Cross-listed with FLST 201-01. This course concerns the emergence and development of the film industry and the various conditions that have and continue to influence it. While artistic considerations are certainly important, the making of films is also a commercial enterprise in which financial concerns are paramount. Moreover, since films enjoy enormous popularity with virtually all in society, regardless of age or education, the political and moral content of films is a constant concern for private as well as governmental organizations. Therefore, this course is also about how competing and often incompatible tensions -- artistic, financial, political, and moral -- have influenced the making of films. This course is cross-listed as FMST 201.
1500:MR   DENNY 211
HIST 315-01 Gender and Sexuality in Modern Japanese History
Instructor: William Young
Course Description:
Cross-listed with EASN 306-02 and WGSS 302-01. This course is an exploration of how sexuality and gender have been continually redefined and experienced throughout modern Japanese history. We will analyze the changes Japanese society underwent from the 19th century to the present, paying particular attention to transformations as well as continuities in eroticism, same-sex love, family structure, and gender roles. A key theme of the course is the socially-constructed nature of gender norms and how women and men frequently transgressed feminine and masculine ideals, a theme that we will explore through both primary sources in translation and secondary scholarship. Building upon in-class workshops and a series of short-essay assignments, the final goal of the course will be to produce a paper that analyzes the development of this new and exciting field of history.
1330:W   DENNY 303
HIST 358-01 19th-20th Century European Diplomacy
Instructor: Regina Sweeney
Course Description:
Cross-listed with INST 358-01. European diplomatic history from the Congress of Vienna through World War II. This course is cross-listed as INST 358. Offered occasionally.
0930:MWF   DENNY 311
HIST 370-01 Cold War in Africa 1945-1990
Instructor: Jeremy Ball
Course Description:
Cross-listed with AFST 320-01 and INST 290-05. Even as the nuclear deterrent kept Europe and North America largely free of warfare after 1945, Cold War rivals fought proxy wars across Africa. This course examines the Cold War calculations of the superpowers and others in the region and assesses the overlapping objectives and interests of African nationalists, white settlers, and decolonizing empires. After an examination of Cold War history and an assessment of Africas historical development, we will focus on case studies: Guinea, The Congo, Angola, Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, and South Africa. The course ends with an analysis of U.S., Soviet, Cuban, and African interpretations of how the Cold War impacted Africa(ns).
1500:TF   DENNY 303
HIST 371-01 The Arab-Israeli Conflict
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
Cross-listed with MEST 231-01. A study of conflict through four phases: the early stages of the Zionist movement and its impact in Ottoman Palestine to 1917; Zionist immigration and settlement and Arab reaction during the Mandate period; the creation of Israel and its wars with the Arab states to 1973; and the rise of a Palestinian Arab nationalist movement and the challenges it poses to Arab states and Israel. This course is cross-listed as MEST 231.
1030:MWF   DENNY 204
HIST 376-01 The Holocaust
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
Cross-listed with JDST 316-01. The course explores the causes of the Shoah/Holocaust, including anti-Semitism, the eugenics movement, the growth of the modern state, and the effects of war. Themes will also explore perpetrator motivation, gendered responses, bystanders and rescuers, and the place of the Holocaust among other genocides. Students will approach the Holocaust through its historiography, which will equip them to interpret facts and understand how and why scholars have shifted interpretations over time. This course is cross-listed as JDST 316. Offered occasionally.
1500:TR   DENNY 203
HIST 404-01 Imperial Rivals: France & Great Britain in the New World, 1689-1763
Instructor: Christopher Bilodeau
Course Description:
This course examines the contentious rivalry between Great Britain and France in their North American and Caribbean colonies between 1689 and 1763. Subjects will cover a wide range of social, economic, cultural, religious, and military topics, such as both empires' relations with American Indian populations, their slave-labor sugar plantations in the Caribbean, their contests over imperial boundaries, and, ultimately, the four wars they fought during the period.
1330:W   LIBRY ARCHCLS
HIST 500-01 Prohibition
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
 
HIST 500-02 Dickinson & Slavery
Instructor: Matthew Pinsker
Course Description:
 
HIST 500-03 Carlisle Race Relations
Instructor: David Commins
Course Description:
 
HIST 550-01 Ethnic Particularism in Soviet Camp Violence, 1935-45
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
 
HIST 550-02 Local Public History Through arcGIS
Instructor: Karl Qualls
Course Description:
 
HIST 550-03 African on the Move: The Somali Experience
Instructor: Marcelo Borges
Course Description: